Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsNature
IN THE NEWS

Nature

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 17, 2009
Nature and wind appear to have created this wreath from a weeping willow branch along Pa. 997 near Mont Alto, Pa.
NEWS
March 7, 2011
Spring is just around the corner, and with a few warm days, we will all be itching to get outside and do something. We all know spring is a time of birth and rebirth, planting and sowing, as well as the flowering of trees and bulbs that have been slumbering in winter’s cold. However, we need to be cautious as spring approaches. You are probably thinking, what is there to be cautious about? Spring is for celebrating. That’s true, but what we need to do is work with nature and not against it. Now is the time when I get many calls about pasture renovation.
NEWS
Celeste Maiorana | July 22, 2011
This is my final column. As a volunteer with other work obligations, I intend to turn my attention to developing a forestry outreach program that is less deadline-driven. I have enjoyed having this forum to share forestry facts and some ideas on how individuals can promote natural ecosystems by making small, incremental changes in their activities and lifestyles. Today, I will concentrate on the virtue of doing nothing. Recently I read a news article about a new and supposedly improved herbicide for use on lawns to suppress the growth of broad-leaved plants.
NEWS
March 23, 1997
By BRENDAN KIRBY Staff Writer Some people line their walls with diplomas. Helen L. Youngblood decorated hers with thank-you notes and certificates of appreciation. She had plenty of them. Friends gathered in the Noland Village community room Sunday afternoon to remember the 48-year-old woman who died last Tuesday. They said her caring presence lifted spirits in the public housing complex and improved the lives of those she touched. "She never worried," said Judi Dominguez, a friend.
NEWS
By YVETTE MAY / Staff Photographer | June 28, 2007
Joseph Coleman and Kevin Wilson examine the bark of a hardwood tree Wednesday at Renfrew Park in Waynesboro, Pa. The boys were participating in the Nose to Nose with Nature program.
NEWS
July 10, 1997
By LISA GRAYBEAL Staff Writer, Chambersburg MERCERSBURG, Pa. - Chaos ensued Wednesday morning after a tiny rodent escaped from the hands of Tuscarora Wildlife Education Project instructor Brent Gift, creating a temporary interruption in the lesson as the girls shrieked and climbed onto picnic tables while the boys started chasing the harmless meadow vole. "Where is he?" cried one boy. "There, catch him," yelled another, pointing to the vole - mistakenly known as a field mouse - heading into the nearby brush.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | October 19, 2008
Editor's note: Each Sunday, The Herald-Mail publishes "A Life Remembered. " This continuing series takes a look back - through the eyes of family, friends, co-workers and others - at a member of the community who died recently. Today's "A Life Remembered" is about Rose DuPuis Clark George, who died Oct. 6 at the age of 88. Her obituary was published in the Oct. 8 edition of The Herald-Mail. A favorite story about Rose DuPuis Clark George's fervor for nature involved an ailing plant that had been tossed into the trash at an area store.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | March 26, 2006
When she was about 7 or 8 years old, Anne Smith came to Hagerstown with her father and sat on a curb watching the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey circus unload at the railroad yards. "We stayed all day," she recalled. "We even brought our lunch in a bag. " That experience and so many others are now what Anne has of her father, H. Gerald Smith, who died March 17 at the age of 97. His love of fun, family and nature is an enduring legacy for her and many others who knew "Smitty" well.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | January 22, 2007
CHARLES TOWN, W.VA. - Carol Robbins and her daughter, Angela Case, are walking along a trail deep in the Blue Ridge Mountain when they reach their destination: a big treehouse. The two go up a spiral staircase to the top of the structure while waiting for a reporter who is tagging along. "Isn't this neat?" asked Robbins, as the view behind her stretched across blue-colored mountain ranges. It's where the Friends Wilderness Center has established its home, back so far in the woods that hardly a sign of man can be seen or heard.
NEWS
By DON AINES | September 1, 2007
STATE LINE, Pa. - The killing of a person by a complete stranger, such as the shooting of Betty Jane Dehart last week, is relatively uncommon, with most homicide victims likely to die at the hands of someone they know. Paul Devoe, 43, a suspect in five killings in Texas, has been charged in the death of the 81-year-old retired seamstress and great-great-grandmother, whom Pennsylvania State Police said he killed for her car. In a statement to police after his capture Monday in Shirley, N.Y., Devoe said he was having car trouble, and saw Dehart sitting on her porch and a car in the driveway.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | August 31, 2013
The Maryland Department of Natural Resources has proposed building two recreational trails for off-road vehicles in the westernmost portion of Washington County. The proposal to build the trails on state-owned land at Sideling Hill North and Sideling Hill South is to be discussed Sept. 4 during a meeting at the New Germany State Park Lake House in Garrett County, according to the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. DNR said it is proposing another off-road vehicle trail in Garrett County at St. Johns Rock.
Advertisement
NEWS
matthewu@herald-mail.com | August 20, 2013
Administrators and teachers in Berkeley and Jefferson counties have been experiencing what gunfire in their public school buildings sounds and feels like as part of a fledgling safe-schools initiative.  “Hopefully, we'll never need this, and they'll never hear it again, but at the same time, I think it helps. You can never be too prepared,” said Ron Stephens, Berkeley County Schools' assistant superintendent for pupil services. “And if it saves one life or makes people take things more seriously when we're talking about safety protocol, then it's well worth it.” The firing of blank ammunition inside the school buildings is part of the Eastern Panhandle Safe Schools Initiative, which is an ongoing collaborative effort of the FBI, West Virginia State Police, Jefferson County Sheriff's Department, Berkeley County Schools and Jefferson County Schools.
NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | July 18, 2013
A group of youngsters this week has been learning first-hand about nature, from the weather to river runoff, as participants in the Fort Frederick State Park Junior Ranger Program. On Tuesday, they were studying fossils, digging up what they could find and learning how to extract fossils from rocks. Emma Schnebly, 10, of Clear Spring said that she enjoyed the experiments and looking for fossils. “There's so much fun stuff to do,” she said. “It's cool projects, but it's explaining something to you so you learn something.” Six youngsters between the ages of 8 and 12 are enrolled in the program at the state park this week, which began Monday and runs through Friday at the Nature Center.
NEWS
By KAUSTUV BASU | kaustuv.basu@herald-mail.com | July 16, 2013
Deadly gases, a lack of oxygen and temperatures well above 100 degrees are some of the factors that could make silo entrapments such as the one that occurred Tuesday on Lehmans Mill Road extremely hazardous, according to experts. Jeff Semler, an Extension educator specializing in agriculture and natural resources for the University of Maryland Extension in Washington County, said one of the chief hazards in silo accidents is the risk of gas - in particular, carbon dioxide. “You can get unconscious very fast due to the lack of oxygen,” Semler said.
LIFESTYLE
July 11, 2013
The Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Maryland Park Service will offer a Junior Ranger Program Monday, July 15, through Friday, July 19, at Fort Frederick State Park for ages 8 to 12. The five-day session is from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Participants will meet at the nature center. This year's program will feature the earth sciences, with units in Potomac River studies, astronomy, geology, meteorology and basic ecology. Each session will be led by a park naturalist and a ranger. Children will assemble take-home projects, engage in crafts, hiking and nature-related games and activities, and explore the Potomac River's aquatic life.
LIFESTYLE
June 13, 2013
Monocacy National Battlefield, in partnership with the Blue Ridge Parkway Foundation, has established a new Track Trail at Worthington Farm. The family-friendly trail, is intended to get kids “unplugged,” outdoors, and reconnected with nature for their health and the health of our parks. The park has designated the Worthington Ford Loop trail as its Track Trail, which features a new wayside sign and map, as well as four brochures for kids to learn more about different aspects of nature during their hike.
NEWS
June 12, 2013
Renfrew Institute's “Nose to Nose With Nature” program returns this summer from 9:30 to 11 a.m. Wednesdays, June 26 to July 31, at Renfrew Park in Waynesboro. The program is designed for children completing grades kindergarten to three. Tools like magnifying lenses, bug boxes and make-your-own “nature's kaleidoscopes,” plus stories, secret missions, music and games will add to the fun and adventure. Participants should bring old sneakers for wading in the creek. The cost is $4 per child per session for Renfrew Institute members and $5 per child per session for nonmembers.
NEWS
June 3, 2013
One of the best parts of my job is spending time with great horticultural minds. Recently, I had the opportunity to attend a state conference that featured not one, but two talks by always impressive author/designer/photographer Rick Darke. His focus was naturalistic gardens and design ethics. His premise is that true wilderness doesn't exist, but that wildness is a renewable resource that is all around us. In other words, man has left a footprint everywhere, but there is much we can do to preserve and restore what we have in our own backyards.  He encouraged us to take a broader view of our gardens as part of a larger ecosystem.
NEWS
May 16, 2013
The Borough of Chambersburg and an area business have been awarded state funding to purchase natural gas vehicles or convert existing vehicles to natural gas. The Borough of Chambersburg, along with project partners IESI Corp. and the Borough of Shippensburg, will receive $472,500 for the purchase or retrofit of 19 vehicles to operate on compressed natural gas. The vehicles include refuse and recycling trucks, a utility bucket truck, and an ambulance, according to a news release from state Rep. Rob Kauffman, R-Franklin/Cumberland.
NEWS
May 6, 2013
As redbuds flash purple along our roadways and tulips blink red and yellow at our doorsteps, I am reminded that natural beauty is awe-inspiring and worth protecting.  Not just on Earth Day, but every day. Gardeners are some of the best environmentalists, choosing smart practices that help, not harm, our natural resources. Every choice you make as a gardener can tip the balance toward conservation. Healthy gardens grow healthy plants. So build healthy soil to keep your gardens productive and part of a vibrant ecosystem.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|