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NEWS
June 29, 2012
(AP) - Maryland is using insects to fight invasive species. The State Highway Administration said Friday that it is using a weevil and a beetle that feed only on invasive species harming native plants in wetlands and along roadways. The weevil feeds on the mile-a-minute vine, an Asian import that grows on shrubs, trees and other plants, blocking out sunlight and killing them. The beetle feeds on purple loosestrife, which can form thick stands, crowding out native plants and altering wetlands water flow.
NEWS
August 29, 2012
The Continuing Education and Business Services Division at Hagerstown Community College will offer a one-day workshop on conservation landscaping Saturday, Sept. 22, from 9 a.m. to noon at HCC's Valley Mall Center. The workshop will teach participants how to manage insects with organic products, recycle yard waste for free, cut water usage in half and create wildlife-friendly gardens using native plants. Cost is $37. For more information or to register, call 240-500-2236, or go to www.hagerstowncc.edu/coned/register .
NEWS
May 15, 2008
WAYNESBORO, Pa. - Otterbein Church will hold its annual Green Thumb Extravaganza on Friday and Saturday to benefit various outreach efforts. More than 4,000 plants are expected to be for sale during the event scheduled for 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. each day. The Green Thumb Extravaganza has been moved from parking lots on the church campus to inside the Otterbein Ministry Center, 912 S. Potomac St. A pancake breakfast, chicken barbeque and...
NEWS
By ANNETTE IPSAN | May 11, 2010
What is a rain garden? It's a garden that captures and filters rainwater. And it's all the rage among those who want to protect the environment and keep pollution out of the Chesapeake Bay and other waterways. Rain gardens are sunken gardens planted with native plants. Placed so they collect rainwater from a downspout, these gardens slowly filter the water from your roof, preventing erosion, trapping pollution and restoring natural water flow. Traditional stormwater management emphasizes moving water away from a home as quickly as possible.
NEWS
by Dorry Baird Norris | September 5, 2004
Details about how and when people began carrying plants from one place to another are skimpy. It certainly started well before the reign of Queen Hatshepsut of Egypt (circa 1518 B.C.) who, it is recorded, sent an expedition to Punt to collect valuable cinnamon and myrrh trees. During the Dark Ages, plants moved from one place to another carried by monks (perhaps in the drawstring purses attached to their rope belts.) The monks sought new medicinal plants for their physic gardens.
NEWS
March 20, 2007
March 22: Dairy Goats 101, Washington County Extension office, 7 p.m. The $5 registration fee may be paid at the door. Call 301-791-1304 for details or to register. March 26: Washington County 4-H Public Speaking Contest, Extension office, 3 to 8 p.m. Call the 4-H office at 301-791-1404 for details. March 26: Tri-County 4-H Leaders Banquet; Shepherdstown (W.Va.) Fire Hall, 6:30 p.m. March 29: Washington County Market Sale Committee, Extension office, 7:30 p.m. March 30: Williamsport-Downsville 4-H Club, Extension office, 7 p.m. April 14: Native Plants, Woodland Plants Workshop & Plant Sale, Franklin County Cooperative Extension, at the Barn across from the Falling Spring Nursing & Rehabilitation Center, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Call 717-263-9226 for more information.
NEWS
March 14, 2008
Monday, March 17 First aid for dogs and cats Learn how to provide first aid for your dogs and cats. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. American Red Cross, 1131 Conrad Court, Hagerstown. $75 per person, includes pet first aid kit and a dog or cat first aid booklet with CD-Rom. Call Rachael Rohrer at 301-739-0717, ext. 214 or e-mail rrohrer@hagerstownredcross.org . Easter craft SHENANDOAH JUNCTION, W.Va. -- Children ages 3 to 5 will make Easter crafts.
NEWS
September 25, 2005
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. Franklin County Master Gardeners will offer their "Principles of Landscape Design" series of classes from 7 to 9:30 p.m. Thursdays, beginning Oct. 6 and running for seven weeks. Classes will be held at the Cooperative Extension Office, 181 Franklin Farm Lane. The cost is $40 for individuals or $45 for couples. For information, call 1-717-263-9226. "Landscape Design" participants will learn how to create their own personal landscape plan. The goal is for students to analyze their site and develop on paper a landscape design for the property, whether a new or existing home site.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2013
The Eastern Panhandle Home Builders Association's 18th annual Home Show, themed “Build on Your Dream,” will take place March 8 to 10 at the Martinsburg Mall. There will be close to 200 vendors present with all types of products and services related to the home, including flooring, heating, air conditioning, windows and spas. “This show has become a tradition in the community,” 2013 Home Show Chairman PJ Orsini said in a news release. “The public is able to meet with local industry professionals and ask questions, see the latest trends in home updates and learn about lifestyle enhancements from a wide range of vendors.” This year's show also will feature educational seminars on Saturday, March 9. Topics include: Hot new decorating trends Landscaping with native plants Cooking demonstration Kitchen design tips Improving your credit score Green technology in the home There also will be a silent auction featuring products and services from vendors and other businesses and organizations.
NEWS
By BRUCE HAMILTON | May 9, 1999
Chesapeake and Ohio National Historical Park and Catoctin Mountain Park are using $50,000 in private grants to study alien and native plants. The grants are among 62 funded by Canon USA Inc. and distributed through the National Park Foundation. C&O National Park is home to more than 1,500 different plants, including 170 rare, threatened or endangered species such as yellow nailwort, Virginia mallow and harperella. Natural Resources Specialist Dianne Ingram said the grant money will be used to survey a 60-mile section on the eastern side of the park from Georgetown to Sandy Hook.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 3, 2013
One of the best parts of my job is spending time with great horticultural minds. Recently, I had the opportunity to attend a state conference that featured not one, but two talks by always impressive author/designer/photographer Rick Darke. His focus was naturalistic gardens and design ethics. His premise is that true wilderness doesn't exist, but that wildness is a renewable resource that is all around us. In other words, man has left a footprint everywhere, but there is much we can do to preserve and restore what we have in our own backyards.  He encouraged us to take a broader view of our gardens as part of a larger ecosystem.
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NEWS
By ANNETTE IPSAN | aipsan@umd.edu | April 16, 2013
It's here. It's here. It's finally here. Spring, glorious spring, has arrived and it's time to wake up our gardens. Start with some spring cleaning. Tidy up your flower gardens by removing stalks not cut back in the fall. Rake off clumps of leaves. And feed the soil in all of your beds with an inch or so of compost.    This is a perfect time to plant trees, shrubs and perennials. Cooler spring weather gives them a chance to grow good roots before the heat hits. How deep should your planting hole be?
BUSINESS
March 3, 2013
The Eastern Panhandle Home Builders Association's 18th annual Home Show, themed “Build on Your Dream,” will take place March 8 to 10 at the Martinsburg Mall. There will be close to 200 vendors present with all types of products and services related to the home, including flooring, heating, air conditioning, windows and spas. “This show has become a tradition in the community,” 2013 Home Show Chairman PJ Orsini said in a news release. “The public is able to meet with local industry professionals and ask questions, see the latest trends in home updates and learn about lifestyle enhancements from a wide range of vendors.” This year's show also will feature educational seminars on Saturday, March 9. Topics include: Hot new decorating trends Landscaping with native plants Cooking demonstration Kitchen design tips Improving your credit score Green technology in the home There also will be a silent auction featuring products and services from vendors and other businesses and organizations.
NEWS
August 29, 2012
The Continuing Education and Business Services Division at Hagerstown Community College will offer a one-day workshop on conservation landscaping Saturday, Sept. 22, from 9 a.m. to noon at HCC's Valley Mall Center. The workshop will teach participants how to manage insects with organic products, recycle yard waste for free, cut water usage in half and create wildlife-friendly gardens using native plants. Cost is $37. For more information or to register, call 240-500-2236, or go to www.hagerstowncc.edu/coned/register .
NEWS
June 29, 2012
(AP) - Maryland is using insects to fight invasive species. The State Highway Administration said Friday that it is using a weevil and a beetle that feed only on invasive species harming native plants in wetlands and along roadways. The weevil feeds on the mile-a-minute vine, an Asian import that grows on shrubs, trees and other plants, blocking out sunlight and killing them. The beetle feeds on purple loosestrife, which can form thick stands, crowding out native plants and altering wetlands water flow.
LIFESTYLE
By LISA PREJEAN | lisap@herald-mail.com | October 3, 2011
Although Anne Courtemanche calls herself a "lazy gardener," her yard reveals that she is quite the opposite. Twelve 55-gallon barrels that serve as reservoirs to catch rainwater sit beside the Hagerstown home she shares with her husband, Bob. Flower beds contain native plants that support area wildlife. A garden out back provides a bountiful harvest of assorted fruits and vegetables. Former Baltimore residents, the Courtemanches initially became interested in the Master Gardener program when they moved to Hagerstown.
NEWS
By ANNETTE IPSAN | April 18, 2011
In honor of Earth Day, I thought I'd share my top tips for environmentally friendly gardens. Gardeners can have a tremendous, positive impact on the environment by adopting a few simple practices that nourish, rather than harm, the world in which we live. Compost is the best thing you can add to your soil. It lightens the heavy clay soil, holds moisture, feeds beneficial soil creatures like earthworms and grows healthier plants. Making compost is as easy as layering food scraps, chopped leaves, grass clippings and other natural materials in a 3-foot pile and turning it occasionally.
LIFESTYLE
Celeste Maiorana | January 21, 2011
Winter is a good time to look at, evaluate and make a plan of action concerning your trees and shrubs and woodlands. It is also a good time to notice what is evergreen and what is not. While you might think that all that's green and growing is good, it is not always true. As you drive and walk around your neighborhood and the countryside, please take time to notice an evergreen vine that can be seen growing thickly, sometimes overwhelmingly, up trees. This is likely to be English ivy, and once you start noticing it, you might be surprised about how commonly it can be seen growing up trees in yards and along woodland edges.
NEWS
By ANNETTE IPSAN | May 11, 2010
What is a rain garden? It's a garden that captures and filters rainwater. And it's all the rage among those who want to protect the environment and keep pollution out of the Chesapeake Bay and other waterways. Rain gardens are sunken gardens planted with native plants. Placed so they collect rainwater from a downspout, these gardens slowly filter the water from your roof, preventing erosion, trapping pollution and restoring natural water flow. Traditional stormwater management emphasizes moving water away from a home as quickly as possible.
NEWS
By CELESTE MAIORANA / Special to The Herald-Mail | November 14, 2009
Rain gardens are shallow depressions formed to capture and soak up stormwater runoff from roofs or other impervious areas such as roads, driveways and sidewalks. They recharge groundwater, improve water quality, and buffer our waterways. They are located in dug or natural low areas planted with suitable trees, shrubs, flowers and other plants. They help filter runoff; they settle and take up pollutants; and they allow water to seep back into the soil. In addition to controlling runoff and improving water quality, rain gardens provide habitat for wildlife and, with a suitable selection of plants, increase the number and diversity of birds and butterflies.
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