Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsNational Cancer Survivors Day
IN THE NEWS

National Cancer Survivors Day

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
by JENNIFER FITCH | June 5, 2006
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Three people stood when the emcee asked how many people in the room had been diagnosed in the past month. Several more stood when asked how many had been diagnosed in the past year, then others at the marks of five years, 10 years, 20 years and so on. Finally, one woman, a survivor for 43 years, rounded out the group of men and women both young and old as the majority of attendees at the National Cancer Survivors Day...
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | June 2, 2008
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Neither Shawn Corwell nor his doctors expected the 35-year-old's leg pain was from B-Cell lymphoma. The initial depression after diagnosis yielded way to a fighting attitude, which Corwell shared Sunday from the stage at the local National Cancer Survivors Day luncheon. "The biggest thing is life's not over," Corwell said. "You've just got to live life. " About 300 cancer survivors and their caregivers joined for lunch hosted by Summit Health and the American Cancer Society.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | June 6, 2011
There were doctors and patients, about 1,000 patients. But there were no stethoscopes or white lab coats. Instead, there were smiles, laughter, hugs, fried chicken and giveaways as approximately 1,000 cancer survivors attended the John R. Marsh Cancer Center’s Celebration of Life picnic at The Improved Order of Red Men’s grounds off Lappans Road near Williamsport on Sunday. “I think it’s empowering for the patients,” said Dr. Dan Cornell, director of radiation oncology.
NEWS
by DON AINES | June 6, 2005
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Being diagnosed with cancer is no laughing matter, but it is no reason to stop laughing, according to someone who knows, cancer survivor and author Lynn Eib. Eib, the author of "When God and Cancer Meet," read some curious entries from patient charts during a speech she gave Sunday at the annual National Cancer Survivors' Day luncheon at King Street United Brethren Church. "The patient has pain if lying on her side for more than a year," one doctor wrote.
NEWS
June 1, 1997
By KERRY LYNN FRALEY Staff Writer It was cramped and sticky under the too-small tent, where hundreds of people sought refuge from the rain Sunday afternoon during Washington County's annual National Cancer Survivors Day picnic. Organizers estimated the rain kept about a third of the expected 625 people from showing up for the four-year-old event, moved to Hagerstown Municipal Stadium this year. Persistent showers ruined plans to tack on a free Hagerstown Suns game after the picnic lunch and short program.
NEWS
By DON AINES | June 7, 1998
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Dr. Douglas Hess has seen "cancer from the other side of the treatment table. " The family physician from Shady Grove, Pa., told a group of about 200 cancer survivors and family members Sunday that his lung cancer was discovered a year ago. He said it was diagnosed as stage four and likened that to golf because "you like low scores, not high scores. " Under sunshine and showers, the cancer survivors gathered for National Cancer Survivors Day outside the Cancer Treatment Center at Chambersburg Hospital, where staff members and volunteers handed out plastic leis.
NEWS
by STACEY DANZUSO | June 3, 2002
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Surviving cancer is all about attitude, said Debbie Pagach, who will celebrate five years of being cancer-free next month. The Mont Alto, Pa., resident was one of more than 200 cancer survivors and their friends and family who celebrated life Sunday afternoon at the Summit Cancer Center's ninth annual National Cancer Survivors' Day. Pagach, 44, was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1997, three weeks after her older sister, Barbara Clopper, was diagnosed with it. She said her sister's diagnosis prompted her to do a breast self-exam, during which she found a lump.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By C.J. LOVELACE | cj.lovelace@herald-mail.com | June 3, 2012
No matter what is going on in someone's life, one six-letter word has the power to bring it all crashing down. Or at least it might seem like it. That word is “cancer.” “It can be pretty intense,” said Dr. Dan Cornell, director of radiation oncology at John R. Marsh Cancer Center. “Obviously, coming down with cancer can be a very difficult thing to deal with.” But the most important things when dealing with cancer, according to a pair of local survivors, is to act quickly, remember that you are not alone and always focus on the positives.
Advertisement
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | June 6, 2010
WILLIAMSPORT -- A total of 900 people were expected and 600 to 700 were estimated to have attended on a rainy Sunday afternoon. Not bad for a "family" reunion that doesn't have the traditional blood ties. "It's become a family in the sense that you're all having the same battle to fight," said Blanton Croft, 76, of Maugansville. Croft was one of many cancer survivors attending the John R. Marsh Cancer Center's Celebration of Life picnic at The Improved Order of Red Men's grounds off Lappans Road near Williamsport on Sunday.
NEWS
June 4, 2010
Cancer Survivors Day celebration CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. -- National Cancer Survivors Day is Sunday, June 6. Summit Cancer and Hematology Services will hold a Cancer Survivors Day celebration from 1 to 3 p.m. at the King Street United Brethren Church, 162 E. King St., Chambersburg, for all cancer survivors and their families. For more information, call 717-262-4660. Free parenting classes "Becoming a Love and Logic Parent" is a three-week course, offered by Washington County Hospital and Potomac Case Management Services that provides simple and practical techniques to help parents have less stress and more fun while raising responsible kids.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | June 2, 2008
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Neither Shawn Corwell nor his doctors expected the 35-year-old's leg pain was from B-Cell lymphoma. The initial depression after diagnosis yielded way to a fighting attitude, which Corwell shared Sunday from the stage at the local National Cancer Survivors Day luncheon. "The biggest thing is life's not over," Corwell said. "You've just got to live life. " About 300 cancer survivors and their caregivers joined for lunch hosted by Summit Health and the American Cancer Society.
NEWS
by JENNIFER FITCH | June 5, 2006
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Three people stood when the emcee asked how many people in the room had been diagnosed in the past month. Several more stood when asked how many had been diagnosed in the past year, then others at the marks of five years, 10 years, 20 years and so on. Finally, one woman, a survivor for 43 years, rounded out the group of men and women both young and old as the majority of attendees at the National Cancer Survivors Day...
NEWS
by DON AINES | June 6, 2005
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Being diagnosed with cancer is no laughing matter, but it is no reason to stop laughing, according to someone who knows, cancer survivor and author Lynn Eib. Eib, the author of "When God and Cancer Meet," read some curious entries from patient charts during a speech she gave Sunday at the annual National Cancer Survivors' Day luncheon at King Street United Brethren Church. "The patient has pain if lying on her side for more than a year," one doctor wrote.
NEWS
by STACEY DANZUSO | June 3, 2002
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Surviving cancer is all about attitude, said Debbie Pagach, who will celebrate five years of being cancer-free next month. The Mont Alto, Pa., resident was one of more than 200 cancer survivors and their friends and family who celebrated life Sunday afternoon at the Summit Cancer Center's ninth annual National Cancer Survivors' Day. Pagach, 44, was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1997, three weeks after her older sister, Barbara Clopper, was diagnosed with it. She said her sister's diagnosis prompted her to do a breast self-exam, during which she found a lump.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|