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NEWS
by ERIN CUNNINGHAM | May 2, 2007
Teacher honored during meeting Washington County Technical High School teacher Martin Nikirk was recognized at Tuesday's Board of Education meeting. Nikirk, who teaches advanced computer applications, was presented a national distinguished service award by the National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium for his leadership in the area of game development. Students recognized for research work Two Washington County Public Schools seniors were recognized Tuesday for their participation in the Werner H. Kirsten Student Internship Program at the National Cancer Institute in Frederick, Md. Atlee Baker, a Smithsburg High School senior, and Alex Ray, a South Hagerstown High School senior, worked as part of a research team with scientists exploring cancer and its effects on the cell.
NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | September 30, 2002
Skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. Lung cancer is the leading cause of death due to cancer in women. Breast cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in women and second leading cause of death due to cancer. This year, an estimated 205,000 new cases of breast cancer will be diagnosed, and there will be 40,000 deaths. But more than twice as many women die from heart disease and stroke than from all forms of cancer including breast cancer.
NEWS
By KATE COLEMAN | April 24, 1998
Joyce Hill is a breast cancer survivor. Five years ago she had both breasts removed and six months of chemotherapy. She has been taking a drug called tamoxifen since then. --cont. from front page-- Tamoxifen has been used for the past two decades to treat breast cancer, according to National Cancer Institute. The drug, taken orally - one pill twice a day - is "quite efficient" in preventing the recurrence of breast cancer, said Dr. Frederic H. Kass, director of John R. Marsh Cancer Center at Robinwood Medical Center in Hagerstown.
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | December 10, 2007
A new program at Washington County Hospital will help cancer patients face the nonmedical issues that come with a cancer diagnosis. Angela Heare was hired as a patient resource navigator, a nonclinical guide available to help cancer patients find services they need as they try to deal with their cancer. Heare's duties could include helping with transportation and finding support groups, health care at home, child care and medication assistance. "Often times, cancer patients are diagnosed, but they have no idea where to turn for help," Heare said.
NEWS
May 1, 2006
What is the pancreas? The pancreas is a gland about 6 inches long that lies behind the stomach. The organ is essential to the digestive process because it produces enzymes that help digest protein, fat and carbohydrates, and it produces insulin. What are symptoms of pancreatic cancer? In most pancreatic cancer cases, there are no symptoms in the early stages of the disease. In later stages, the cancer might cause pressure in the abdomen and pain in the upper abdomen or lower back, says Sandra Hoffman, associate scientist and assistant director of the Hagerstown-based George W. Comstock Center for Public Health Research and Prevention.
NEWS
By JONATHAN R. BURRS | August 3, 2008
This past week must have been one intended for deep thought, consideration and reflection for me concerning the many good-hearted, positive people of Hagerstown, Washington County and the Tri-State areas in general. On July 23, I read the Bob Maginnis' column "Trying to be the 'last one in the lifeboat' isn't a good idea," where he wrote about the good- hearted people in Washington County who regularly give of themselves and their finances to support worthy causes such as the United Way campaign and the American Red Cross.
NEWS
by ANDREW SCHOTZ | June 27, 2004
andrews@herald-mail.com HAGERSTOWN - Eight members of the Jenkins family of Hagerstown were at Saturday's Dream Come True picnic, but their fun had a limit: Something - rather, someone - was missing. Brittany was 8 when she died of complications from a kidney transplant on Jan. 20, 2003. Cancer took both of her original kidneys. A few years before she died, Brittany and her family went to Walt Disney World in Florida and got to meet Mickey and Minnie Mouse, her favorites.
NEWS
January 26, 2008
Don't ruin North Mountain To the editor: A pile of bricks does not a mountain make. Only God can make a mountain. He gave us a lovely North Mountain, W.Va. Why ruin it? It is about money, money, money. What a legacy to leave our children. I want to know who will buy all those houses going up on Apple Pie Ridge when the picturesque view of North Mountain has disappeared? Do Richmond Homes and Ryan Home Builders know about this? I am sure it will not help the sale of those homes.
NEWS
by KRISTIN WILSON | May 1, 2006
If all had gone according to plan, Patricia Firey would find out sometime this month that she has pancreatic cancer. But all didn't go according to plan. By a fluke, Firey had a magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) scan of her pancreas in February instead of waiting for her appointment later this month. That fluke might save her life, she says. The MRCP scan - a special type of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) - showed that Firey, 65, a Clear Spring-area resident, might have pancreatic cancer.
NEWS
by BOB MAGINNIS | February 18, 2007
Don't ever stop being an advocate for your child. So says Mary Anne Pile, of Falling Waters, W.Va. Pile said that after "having a gut feeling that something was wrong," she took her child, Kaidyn, to a local emergency room where the staff told her that the girl, then 10 months old, probably had pneumonia. Her husband Brandon, who is a nurse himself, disagreed, saying the child's symptoms didn't seem to fit that diagnosis. After some discussions with hospital staff, Pile said they agreed to give the child a CAT scan.
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NEWS
By JONATHAN R. BURRS | August 3, 2008
This past week must have been one intended for deep thought, consideration and reflection for me concerning the many good-hearted, positive people of Hagerstown, Washington County and the Tri-State areas in general. On July 23, I read the Bob Maginnis' column "Trying to be the 'last one in the lifeboat' isn't a good idea," where he wrote about the good- hearted people in Washington County who regularly give of themselves and their finances to support worthy causes such as the United Way campaign and the American Red Cross.
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NEWS
January 26, 2008
Don't ruin North Mountain To the editor: A pile of bricks does not a mountain make. Only God can make a mountain. He gave us a lovely North Mountain, W.Va. Why ruin it? It is about money, money, money. What a legacy to leave our children. I want to know who will buy all those houses going up on Apple Pie Ridge when the picturesque view of North Mountain has disappeared? Do Richmond Homes and Ryan Home Builders know about this? I am sure it will not help the sale of those homes.
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | December 10, 2007
A new program at Washington County Hospital will help cancer patients face the nonmedical issues that come with a cancer diagnosis. Angela Heare was hired as a patient resource navigator, a nonclinical guide available to help cancer patients find services they need as they try to deal with their cancer. Heare's duties could include helping with transportation and finding support groups, health care at home, child care and medication assistance. "Often times, cancer patients are diagnosed, but they have no idea where to turn for help," Heare said.
NEWS
by ERIN CUNNINGHAM | May 2, 2007
Teacher honored during meeting Washington County Technical High School teacher Martin Nikirk was recognized at Tuesday's Board of Education meeting. Nikirk, who teaches advanced computer applications, was presented a national distinguished service award by the National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium for his leadership in the area of game development. Students recognized for research work Two Washington County Public Schools seniors were recognized Tuesday for their participation in the Werner H. Kirsten Student Internship Program at the National Cancer Institute in Frederick, Md. Atlee Baker, a Smithsburg High School senior, and Alex Ray, a South Hagerstown High School senior, worked as part of a research team with scientists exploring cancer and its effects on the cell.
NEWS
by BOB MAGINNIS | February 18, 2007
Don't ever stop being an advocate for your child. So says Mary Anne Pile, of Falling Waters, W.Va. Pile said that after "having a gut feeling that something was wrong," she took her child, Kaidyn, to a local emergency room where the staff told her that the girl, then 10 months old, probably had pneumonia. Her husband Brandon, who is a nurse himself, disagreed, saying the child's symptoms didn't seem to fit that diagnosis. After some discussions with hospital staff, Pile said they agreed to give the child a CAT scan.
NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | June 23, 2006
FREDERICK, MD. By the fifth day on the job, the high school senior knew how to clip DNA for insertion into bacteria cells. His fellow intern, another high school student, knew how to copy portions of DNA. The Washington County students hope their work, part of a yearlong internship program at the National Cancer Institute in Frederick, will help in the ongoing efforts to find a cure for cancer. "What I might discover might help someone else," said intern Atlee Baker, 17, of Hagerstown.
NEWS
May 1, 2006
What is the pancreas? The pancreas is a gland about 6 inches long that lies behind the stomach. The organ is essential to the digestive process because it produces enzymes that help digest protein, fat and carbohydrates, and it produces insulin. What are symptoms of pancreatic cancer? In most pancreatic cancer cases, there are no symptoms in the early stages of the disease. In later stages, the cancer might cause pressure in the abdomen and pain in the upper abdomen or lower back, says Sandra Hoffman, associate scientist and assistant director of the Hagerstown-based George W. Comstock Center for Public Health Research and Prevention.
NEWS
by KRISTIN WILSON | May 1, 2006
If all had gone according to plan, Patricia Firey would find out sometime this month that she has pancreatic cancer. But all didn't go according to plan. By a fluke, Firey had a magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) scan of her pancreas in February instead of waiting for her appointment later this month. That fluke might save her life, she says. The MRCP scan - a special type of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) - showed that Firey, 65, a Clear Spring-area resident, might have pancreatic cancer.
NEWS
by ANDREW SCHOTZ | June 27, 2004
andrews@herald-mail.com HAGERSTOWN - Eight members of the Jenkins family of Hagerstown were at Saturday's Dream Come True picnic, but their fun had a limit: Something - rather, someone - was missing. Brittany was 8 when she died of complications from a kidney transplant on Jan. 20, 2003. Cancer took both of her original kidneys. A few years before she died, Brittany and her family went to Walt Disney World in Florida and got to meet Mickey and Minnie Mouse, her favorites.
NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | September 30, 2002
Skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. Lung cancer is the leading cause of death due to cancer in women. Breast cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in women and second leading cause of death due to cancer. This year, an estimated 205,000 new cases of breast cancer will be diagnosed, and there will be 40,000 deaths. But more than twice as many women die from heart disease and stroke than from all forms of cancer including breast cancer.
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