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LIFESTYLE
March 28, 2011
The North Hagerstown High School Band Boosters will hold their annual mulch sale Saturday, April 9, beginning at 7 a.m. The brown, shredded hardwood mulch costs $4.50 per bag. There will be free delivery for 15 bags or more. Send orders by Wednesday to Susan Smith at redsuzyq62@yahoo.com , or mail checks to NHHS Band Boosters, P.O. Box 1884, Hagerstown MD 21742. For more information, call 301-791-2502.
NEWS
September 23, 2010
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. --A $10,000 grant that the Berkeley County Solid Waste Authority (BCSWA) received from the West Virginia Solid Waste Management Board will be used to offset costs associated with grinding large volumes of brush and Christmas trees into mulch, BCSWA Chairman Clint Hogbin announced this week. Berkeley County's SWA was one of 30 statewide to receive grant awards totaling $300,000, Hogbin said in a news release. Berkeley County's grant will be utilized to offset costs associated with the work that is done at the South Berkeley and Grapevine Road recycling centers, Hogbin said.
NEWS
By JEFF RUGG, Creators Syndicate | June 26, 2009
Q: Will mulch cause a problem for native plants in my flowerbeds? A: Think of what ecosystem the plants came from and what kind of ecosystem you are recreating in your flowerbeds. If it is a northern woodland plant, it would have had a loose soil with lots of debris on top, so bark or pine needle mulch is fine. A loose layer of any organic material will help retain soil moisture and reduce weed growth. As the material decays, it will help form a good organic soil. Prairies do build up organic matter on the soil that decays, but it is not woody material.
NEWS
August 17, 2007
WILLIAMSPORT - The Elmwood Farm community in Williamsport is producing more than new homes. In a year that has been a challenge for gardening, Mike Hurley produced a tomato that weighed 2 pounds, 7 ounces. He said the vines grew to 6-plus feet and are now draping over and filled with more 2-pound tomatoes. Hurley said he was given two plants in early spring by a co-worker who said they were yellow tomatoes. The plants were kept inside in early spring where they grew and grew.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | January 2, 2008
HAGERSTOWN - When the Christmas tree is relieved of decorations and moved from your living room to the curb, it can find itself in the wood chipper, used by local governments to recycle trees into mulch. Hagerstown Public Works Director Eric Deike said city workers commit about one week each year to picking up trees that have been placed at the curb. From there, they're taken to a piece of city-owned property and fed into a wood chipper. The finished product is a low-quality mulch that city workers later spread on embankments to control weeds, Deike said.
NEWS
BY KEVIN CLAPP | March 14, 2002
Looking to plant a tree or shrub this spring? Here are some helpful hints from Laurie Morkved, landscape designer and horticulturist at Ott's Horticulture Center. Wider is better Most people erroneously think planting in a deep hole is best for plants, when Morkved says that can amount to creating a watery grave that will rot the plant's root ball. Instead, a hole should be shallow enough to leave exposed the top of the root ball, while two to three times as wide since roots spread out, not down, as plants grow.
NEWS
By RIC DUGAN | April 4, 2006
Rick Shupp of Antietam Tree & Landscape arranges mulch Monday outside the new entrance to Hagerstown's Municipal Stadium. The Hagerstown Suns' home opener is April 10.
NEWS
March 1, 2002
SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. - Fire officials think slowly burning mulch outside Jefferson Security Bank overnight Wednesday caused the lobby area to fill with smoke Thursday morning. Employees at the bank, at the corner of Washington and Princess streets, smelled smoke Wednesday afternoon but could not determine where it was coming from, said Leon Catrow, chief of the Shepherdstown Volunteer Fire Co. Catrow said he believes the mulch may have started smoldering when someone pitched a cigarette butt into it. The mulch apparently smoldered all night, and burned a section around some wood trim at the front door, said Catrow.
NEWS
May 9, 2010
Editor's note: Each Monday, The Herald-Mail will highlight an infrastructure issue or other problem and will try to find out what is being done to fix or improve the situation. We will not tackle situations involving neighborhood or domestic disputes or consumer problems. The problem: Tall mounds of mulch encircling the trunks of trees have become a common landscaping feature, but experts say this practice can harm or kill trees if not done properly. A Boonsboro resident sent in a photo of a tree near her home in Schoolhouse Manor, a senior housing community in Boonsboro managed by the Housing Authority of Washington County, which shows a deep mulch pile touching the trunk of the tree.
NEWS
October 20, 2007
Jymeisha Castle shows her muddy hands Friday after playing in the mud and mulch near her Halfway Manor home. Before evening storms rolled through the area, Friday's rainfall wasn't enough, so Jymeisha made her own mud.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
August 5, 2012
“I'm a volunteer at Hagerstown Community College, and recently I went over to help with the garden planting and mulching, and I was so impressed with the staff at the community college, especially Ed, the man who takes care of all the gardens and so forth. He had mulch brought to all 50 or 60 gardens, so that we, the volunteers, could take the mulch from the trucks and help get it around. He's a wonderful person, and we appreciate all that he has done.” - Fayetteville, Pa. “On the county roads, I wonder why the north side of Route 40 gets blacktopped, the south side gets tar and chip.
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NEWS
Melita Wishard | Around Maugansville | April 7, 2011
The North Hagerstown High School Band Boosters will hold its annual mulch sale at the school Saturday, beginning at 7:30 a.m. The brown shredded hardwood mulch costs $4.50 per bag. There will be free delivery for 15 bags or more. For more information, call 301-988-8657. AAUW Used Book Sale has new location The 44th annual AAUW Used Book Sale will be April 14, 15, 16. This year the event takes place at a new location at the ARC of Washington County building, 1000 Florida Ave., Hagerstown.
LIFESTYLE
March 28, 2011
The North Hagerstown High School Band Boosters will hold their annual mulch sale Saturday, April 9, beginning at 7 a.m. The brown, shredded hardwood mulch costs $4.50 per bag. There will be free delivery for 15 bags or more. Send orders by Wednesday to Susan Smith at redsuzyq62@yahoo.com , or mail checks to NHHS Band Boosters, P.O. Box 1884, Hagerstown MD 21742. For more information, call 301-791-2502.
LIFESTYLE
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | tiffanya@herald-mail.com | March 9, 2011
Enough with the snow, already. We’re ready to find fun in our own backyards. Spring is the time for outdoor entertaining. So for tips on fuss-free ways to design a party-perfect yard, we went to the source: Participants in the upcoming Flower & Garden Show at Hagerstown Community College on Saturday, March 12, and Sunday, March 13.   Each year, vendors tout the latest and greatest in gardening during the yearly fundraiser for the...
NEWS
September 23, 2010
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. --A $10,000 grant that the Berkeley County Solid Waste Authority (BCSWA) received from the West Virginia Solid Waste Management Board will be used to offset costs associated with grinding large volumes of brush and Christmas trees into mulch, BCSWA Chairman Clint Hogbin announced this week. Berkeley County's SWA was one of 30 statewide to receive grant awards totaling $300,000, Hogbin said in a news release. Berkeley County's grant will be utilized to offset costs associated with the work that is done at the South Berkeley and Grapevine Road recycling centers, Hogbin said.
NEWS
May 9, 2010
Editor's note: Each Monday, The Herald-Mail will highlight an infrastructure issue or other problem and will try to find out what is being done to fix or improve the situation. We will not tackle situations involving neighborhood or domestic disputes or consumer problems. The problem: Tall mounds of mulch encircling the trunks of trees have become a common landscaping feature, but experts say this practice can harm or kill trees if not done properly. A Boonsboro resident sent in a photo of a tree near her home in Schoolhouse Manor, a senior housing community in Boonsboro managed by the Housing Authority of Washington County, which shows a deep mulch pile touching the trunk of the tree.
NEWS
By ERIN JULIUS | April 22, 2010
WASHINGTON COUNTY --A number of local organizations on Thursday celebrated Earth Day through projects intended to spruce up the community. In Clear Spring, Grosh's Lawn Service teamed up with a group of Clear Spring Middle School students to plant, mulch and tend the area around the town's library branch. Tom Grosh, owner of the lawn service, arranged with the county - which maintains that area - for the project. Businesses involved in the Professional Landcare Network (PLANET)
NEWS
By JEFF RUGG / Creators Syndicate | August 14, 2009
Q: We have a few trees in what we laughingly call our park. Some of the tree roots are sticking above the ground and I am afraid that someone might trip or the roots might be damaged by the maintenance of the grass with lawnmowers and Weedwackers, etc. I researched this somewhat and am now confused. Some say you can cover them with soil and mulch. Some say that would suffocate them and that putting some soil between the roots and then a light layer of mulch over the area might be OK. What's your opinion?
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | July 16, 2009
As a soccer player, Kyle Marshall is used to watching the skies to determine whether a game will be played. The weekend of July 11 and 12, Kyle was checking the weather for a different reason. As part of his Eagle Scout requirements, Kyle, 15, supervised a massive two-day landscaping project at the Hagerstown Ice & Sports Complex next to Fairgrounds Park. It turned into a three-day project, with Kyle and five of his helpers returning Monday, according to his mother, Patricia Marshall.
NEWS
By JEFF RUGG, Creators Syndicate | June 26, 2009
Q: Will mulch cause a problem for native plants in my flowerbeds? A: Think of what ecosystem the plants came from and what kind of ecosystem you are recreating in your flowerbeds. If it is a northern woodland plant, it would have had a loose soil with lots of debris on top, so bark or pine needle mulch is fine. A loose layer of any organic material will help retain soil moisture and reduce weed growth. As the material decays, it will help form a good organic soil. Prairies do build up organic matter on the soil that decays, but it is not woody material.
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