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NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | October 23, 2007
GREENCASTLE, Pa. - A Greencastle-Antrim student diagnosed with methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is fine and in class, said Bob Crider, director of secondary education for the school district. "We've been assured from our physician that that's OK," Crider said Monday afternoon. The school district announced Friday that a student had been diagnosed with the staph infection. A memo to parents detailed how to identify lesions, and the schools have been working with a strict disinfecting regimen.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | October 18, 2007
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - There have been five confirmed cases of Berkeley County Schools students suffering from the MRSA staph infection, but the county's health officer is not recommending that any of the county's schools be closed. Although health officials say it appears the dangerous staph infection is probably killing more Americans every year than AIDS and was blamed for the death Monday of a 17-year-old Virginia high school senior, Berkeley County Schools officials can probably keep the infection in check by taking precautions at schools, said Dr. Diana Gaviria.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | October 24, 2007
WAYNESBORO, Pa. - Franklin County school districts continued to provide parents with information about their disinfecting initiatives Tuesday - a day when both Waynesboro and Chambersburg officials confirmed students have been diagnosed with methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Representatives of the Greencastle-Antrim School District announced last Friday that a student there had been diagnosed with the staph infection resistant to common antibiotics. The student has returned to class and is doing fine, officials said Monday.
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | March 31, 2008
Starting in April, anyone admitted to a critical care unit at Washington County Hospital will be screened for MRSA. The blanket screenings will affect the estimated 1,500 people admitted to the hospital's intensive care or cardiac care units each year, said Dr. John Newby, director of labs for Washington County Health System and chairman of Washington County Hospital's infection control committee. Newby said critical-care patients are at the highest risk of acquiring MRSA in a hospital setting.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | December 12, 2005
julieg@herald-mail.com Staphylococcus aureus. Lots of people have this common bacteria, but usually it doesn't cause a problem, doctors say. In many cases, people don't realize they have an infection or their immune systems are able to handle it, says Dr. John Newby, director of laboratories for Washington County Health System. It's when the immune system cannot handle a staph infection and requires antibiotic treatment that staphylococcus aureus can cause a bigger problem.
OPINION
July 16, 2012
If there's no evolution, there's no need for better antibiotics To the editor: There have been letters back and forth in the creation versus evolution discussions. It is possible to argue that there is no such thing as evolution. It is also possible to argue that Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is very dangerous.  It requires a lot of mental gymnastics to insist that there is no evolution and that some forms of Staphylococcus aureus have evolved into  MRSA forms of Staphylococcus.
NEWS
August 11, 2008
Answers about ostomy issues Ann Sowers-Roney, a certified wound, ostomy, and continence nurse specialist will be on hand to answer questions about ostomy issues, and to discuss new appliance options from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 14, Equipped for Life, 525 Dual Highway, Hagerstown. For information, call Equipped for Life at 301-714-0200. Education about stopping MRSA Strike Out Infection, a nationwide campaign designed the public about preventing the spread of MRSA and other infections in local hospitals, schools and sports team will be held on Monday, Aug. 18, at Baltimore Convention Center.
NEWS
September 17, 2010
"I'm calling about the lady who thinks it's preposterous to trap outdoor cats. We live sort of out in the country, and we have, at least three or four times a year, people dropping off seven and eight cats in our area. These are people that do not care enough about their animals to keep them inside and healthy. We trap them and we take them to the Humane Society, too. This is not normal in this day and age. " - Martinsburg, W.Va. "I totally agree with everyone that are catching the cats around Hagerstown.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
July 16, 2012
If there's no evolution, there's no need for better antibiotics To the editor: There have been letters back and forth in the creation versus evolution discussions. It is possible to argue that there is no such thing as evolution. It is also possible to argue that Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is very dangerous.  It requires a lot of mental gymnastics to insist that there is no evolution and that some forms of Staphylococcus aureus have evolved into  MRSA forms of Staphylococcus.
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NEWS
September 17, 2010
"I'm calling about the lady who thinks it's preposterous to trap outdoor cats. We live sort of out in the country, and we have, at least three or four times a year, people dropping off seven and eight cats in our area. These are people that do not care enough about their animals to keep them inside and healthy. We trap them and we take them to the Humane Society, too. This is not normal in this day and age. " - Martinsburg, W.Va. "I totally agree with everyone that are catching the cats around Hagerstown.
NEWS
August 11, 2008
Answers about ostomy issues Ann Sowers-Roney, a certified wound, ostomy, and continence nurse specialist will be on hand to answer questions about ostomy issues, and to discuss new appliance options from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 14, Equipped for Life, 525 Dual Highway, Hagerstown. For information, call Equipped for Life at 301-714-0200. Education about stopping MRSA Strike Out Infection, a nationwide campaign designed the public about preventing the spread of MRSA and other infections in local hospitals, schools and sports team will be held on Monday, Aug. 18, at Baltimore Convention Center.
NEWS
By ERIN JULIUS | May 9, 2008
HAGERSTOWN -- Correctional officers raised concerns about MRSA - methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus infection - during a meeting Thursday afternoon with Gov. Martin O'Malley and prison officials at the Maryland Correctional Training Center. O'Malley and Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services Secretary Gary Maynard met with the wardens of three state prisons south of Hagerstown, about 25 correctional officers and union officials. Members of the media were ushered out after O'Malley and Maryland Correctional Training Center Warden Ken Horning made their opening remarks.
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | March 31, 2008
Starting in April, anyone admitted to a critical care unit at Washington County Hospital will be screened for MRSA. The blanket screenings will affect the estimated 1,500 people admitted to the hospital's intensive care or cardiac care units each year, said Dr. John Newby, director of labs for Washington County Health System and chairman of Washington County Hospital's infection control committee. Newby said critical-care patients are at the highest risk of acquiring MRSA in a hospital setting.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | October 24, 2007
WAYNESBORO, Pa. - Franklin County school districts continued to provide parents with information about their disinfecting initiatives Tuesday - a day when both Waynesboro and Chambersburg officials confirmed students have been diagnosed with methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Representatives of the Greencastle-Antrim School District announced last Friday that a student there had been diagnosed with the staph infection resistant to common antibiotics. The student has returned to class and is doing fine, officials said Monday.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | October 23, 2007
GREENCASTLE, Pa. - A Greencastle-Antrim student diagnosed with methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is fine and in class, said Bob Crider, director of secondary education for the school district. "We've been assured from our physician that that's OK," Crider said Monday afternoon. The school district announced Friday that a student had been diagnosed with the staph infection. A memo to parents detailed how to identify lesions, and the schools have been working with a strict disinfecting regimen.
NEWS
By DON AINES | October 20, 2007
GREENCASTLE, Pa. ? A student in the Greencastle-Antrim School District has been diagnosed with methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus, a bacterial infection, according to district officials. "He's not hospitalized. The student is doing fine," Acting Superintendent C. Gregory Hoover said. "No one's in danager. That's what the experts have told us, and we wouldn't say that unless we had verification. " On Monday, a 17-year-old high school student in Bedford County, Va., who was infected with a form of MRSA died, according to the Associated Press.
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