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Mosque

NEWS
September 9, 2010
GAINESVILLE, Fla. (AP) -- An imam says the leader of a small Florida church told him that he would call off a plan to burn the Quran because it would endanger troops, not because they had a deal to move the location of a mosque planned near ground zero. Imam Muhammad Musri said late Thursday that he and the Rev. Terry Jones agreed to have a meeting in New York about the location. He says Jones told him he would cancel the burning after a call from the Secretary of Defense and because other religious and political leaders including the president all came out against it. When they spoke to the media after the meeting, Musri says Jones "stretched my words" about what was said about the mosque.
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NEWS
September 10, 2010
NEW YORK (AP) -- They will read the names, of course, the names of every victim who died in the Sept. 11 attacks. The bells will ring. And then that moment of unity will give way to division as activists hoist signs and march, some for and some against a planned mosque two blocks from ground zero. This 9/11 is more political and contentious than the eight before it, with grieving family members on opposite sides of the mosque battle. The debate became so heated that President Barack Obama felt the need to remind Americans: "We are not at war against Islam.
NEWS
by HIRA ZEB | November 8, 2005
More than 6 million Muslims make their home in the U.S., representing one of the fastest growing religions in the nation. Muslims across the country celebrated Eid-ul-Fitr last week. Eid-ul-Fitr is a three-day festival marking the end of the holy month of Ramadan, a month of fasting, praying and listening to the Quran, one of the Muslim holy books. The sighting of the new moon heralds the arrival of Eid-ul-Fitr. On Wednesday night, Nov. 2, my friends and I anxiously awaited a report.
NEWS
by KAREN HANNA | April 11, 2005
karenh@herald-mail.com HAGERSTOWN - Ilimdar Akhmedov, 26, already wears baseball caps like an American - backward and low over his eyebrows. It's the dark hair underneath that explains why he's here. Akhmedov, whose family is one of nine that recently came to Hagerstown from Russia, pointed to the cap Sunday as he told an interpreter about the discrimination that drove him and other Meskhetian Turks to America. "He says, 'In Russia, anyone (who) has dark hair, they don't like,'" said Mustafa Sefik, who speaks Turkish.
OPINION
August 28, 2010
My three favorite phrases are, in reverse order: No. 3. "What the Founding Fathers really said was ... " No. 2. "What the Founding Fathers were trying to say was ... " No. 1. "What the Founding Fathers meant to say was ... " I think it's really cool the way we can, two centuries hence, all travel back in time and place ourselves squarely in the Founding Fathers' respective lemons. The woman who's running for Senate in Nevada recently said if one reads the Founding Fathers' writings, it's clear they were conservative.
NEWS
By PEPPER BALLARD | January 8, 2006
pepperb@herald-mail.com HAGERSTOWN - The Imam of The Islamic Society of Western Maryland's Masjid, or mosque, Qasim Burmi, his wife and other members of the Islamic Society are in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, to participate in the annual Hajj, or obligatory pilgrimage to Mecca, Dr. Shahab Siddiqui said Friday. Millions of Muslims across the globe will begin their religious observances of the annual Hajj on Monday, the pilgrimage Muslims must make at least once in their lifetimes.
NEWS
November 9, 2009
FORT HOOD, Texas (AP) -- The man accused of killing 13 people and wounding 29 at Fort Hood is able to talk, a hospital spokesman said Monday, but it's unknown when investigators might take advantage of his improving health to press forward with their probe into the shooting spree. Authorities say Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan fired off more than 100 rounds Thursday at a soldier processing center before civilian police shot him in the torso. He was taken into custody and eventually moved to an Army hospital in San Antonio, where he was in stable condition and able to talk, said Dewey Mitchell, a Brooke Army Medical Center spokesman.
NEWS
By JOSHUA BOWMAN | September 11, 2008
HAGERSTOWN -- In the early 1980s, as he prepared to move to New York from the south, Mohammad Haq's neighbors warned him to buy a weapon. "Everyone said, 'It's dangerous,' you better have a gun,' and I believed them," Haq said. After moving, Haq quickly realized he would be fine in New York. He said his neighbors' fears were rooted in images from TV. "We develop images about other people based on a very narrow window of understanding," Haq said Wednesday at the beginning of a yearly open house conducted by the Islamic Society of Western Maryland.
NEWS
September 16, 2010
MONT ALTO, Pa. -- Penn State Mont Alto will host the university's "writer's blocks" on campus today to focus attention on Constitution Day. The blocks, publicly placed artwork that doubles as a venue for students to express in writing their opinions on certain topics, will also be installed on the University Park and Brandywine campuses. The blocks were designed in 2007 by students at University Park in the first-year art and design studio run by Peter Aeschbacher, assistant professor of architecture.
NEWS
September 10, 2010
GAINESVILLE, Fla. (AP) -- An acquaintance of the pastor who once planned to burn copies of the Quran to mark the 9/11 anniversary says the Rev. Terry Jones headed to New York aboard a Friday night flight. K.A. Paul, a Christian evangelist who runs a ministry in Houston, says he bought the ticket for Jones to fly out of Orlando and land around 10:15 p.m. in New York. Jones landed in New York Friday night and declined to talk to reporters on his way to a cab. Jones has said he wants to meet with the imam overseeing a proposed mosque and Islamic center to be built near ground zero.
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