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Morse Code

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NEWS
By CHRIS COPLEY | December 26, 2008
"Come at once. We have struck an iceberg. " This line, transmitted by wireless telegraphers aboard the sinking Titanic, was sent via cutting edge telecommunications -- Morse code. An exhibit at Discovery Station in Hagerstown highlights Morse code and telegraphy. A collection of "keys," the units that transmit or receive Morse code, are on display through March. For most people, Morse code is as dry and dusty as any outdated technology. But 170 years ago, Morse code and its hardware -- the telegraph system -- were revolutionary, according to Dave Ingram, an Alabama ham radio operator and Morse code expert who contributed some items to the display at Discovery Station.
NEWS
December 11, 2008
RMS Titanic and Morse Code exhibits Features a historically accurate, 15-foot-long, hand-built replica of the famous ship. The Morse Code exhibit is on loan from NBC-25 news director Mark Kraham and includes his collection of Morse Code telegraph equipment and historic memorabilia. Discovery Station, 101 W. Washington St., Hagerstown. Admission costs $7; $6, ages 2 to 17; $5, ages 55 and older and military; free for ages younger than 2. Go to www.discoverystation.org . Photography MARTINSBURG, W.Va.
NEWS
By STACI CLIPP / 301-991-4103 | December 15, 2008
Hello! Well, I hope you're getting ready for Christmas. It's approaching quickly. Discovery Station has Morse code, Titanic exhibits Discovery Station has a Morse code exhibit and a replica of the Titanic on display. The Morse code exhibit features a collection of telegraph keys and equipment of varied design and vintage, and related historic memorabilia on loan from NBC 25 News Director Mark Kraham. Included are visual excerpts demonstrating the communication of the telegraph used over the world for many decades.
NEWS
by LAURA ERNDE | June 29, 2003
laurae@herald-mail.com LEITERSBURG - While many people rely on high-tech equipment such as cell phones and computers for communication these days, there's nothing like the old standby of a short-wave radio. That's the theory behind the American Radio Relay League's annual Field Day. Short-wave radios can run on little power and their signals can travel great distances, which makes them ideal in an emergency. Field Day is all about making sure the nation's ham radios - and their operators - are ready to be called up in a disaster.
NEWS
By JANET HEIM | July 4, 2010
MAUGANSVILLE-- By day, Ronald Meihls is operations and maintenance supervisor for the City of Hagerstown's Water and Sewer Department. By night, he is a federally licensed amateur radio operator known as KB3MBS, whose skills helped in relief efforts when he traveled to Haiti about five weeks after the Jan. 12 earthquake. Meihls provided backup communications for the Medishare Field Hospital at the airport in Port-au-Prince. "This was a critical lifeline, because all communication was down but the radios," Meihls said.
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OBITUARIES
May 3, 2012
Milford C. Gossard, 90, of Cudjoe Key, Fla., passed away on Monday, April 23, 2012. Born May 15, 1921, in Hagerstown, Md., he was the son of the late Charles M. Gossard and Grace V. Gossard. Becoming interested in high school in radio and electronics, he was licensed by the Federal Communications Commission as a radio amateur and was assigned the amateur call letters W3IJF in 1939. He enlisted in the Army Air Force in 1942 and was assigned military duties as a high-speed Morse Code operator, serving at radio stations in the United States and overseas locations.
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SPORTS
By BIG SYDNEY | November 9, 2011
The art of communication has come a long way. I'm not going to say that I've been doing this for a long time, but I remember when I used to use Morse Code to send my picks to the masses before I got this newspaper gig. But now, it is as easy as pressing a button. Computers, cell phones, texts, Facebook, Twitter have all made sending information so immediate. It's to the point you know what I pick before I do … and that is just the lunch special at the Hungry Heifer. The communication in a football game is much different.
NEWS
By JANET HEIM | July 4, 2010
MAUGANSVILLE-- By day, Ronald Meihls is operations and maintenance supervisor for the City of Hagerstown's Water and Sewer Department. By night, he is a federally licensed amateur radio operator known as KB3MBS, whose skills helped in relief efforts when he traveled to Haiti about five weeks after the Jan. 12 earthquake. Meihls provided backup communications for the Medishare Field Hospital at the airport in Port-au-Prince. "This was a critical lifeline, because all communication was down but the radios," Meihls said.
NEWS
October 8, 2009
Canal exhibit wraps up WILLIAMSPORT -- Children and adults can experience canal engineering firsthand through Sunday, Oct. 11. Free. Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park, Trolley Barn Building at Cushwa Basin. Call 301-582-0813. Paintings and sketches Artwork by Evan Shepherd will be exhibited through Wednesday, Oct. 28. Washington County Arts Council, 14 W. Washington St., Hagerstown. Call 301-791-3132. Art in the hallway Terry Shotton displays paintings during October.
NEWS
By CHRIS COPLEY | December 26, 2008
"Come at once. We have struck an iceberg. " This line, transmitted by wireless telegraphers aboard the sinking Titanic, was sent via cutting edge telecommunications -- Morse code. An exhibit at Discovery Station in Hagerstown highlights Morse code and telegraphy. A collection of "keys," the units that transmit or receive Morse code, are on display through March. For most people, Morse code is as dry and dusty as any outdated technology. But 170 years ago, Morse code and its hardware -- the telegraph system -- were revolutionary, according to Dave Ingram, an Alabama ham radio operator and Morse code expert who contributed some items to the display at Discovery Station.
NEWS
By STACI CLIPP / 301-991-4103 | December 15, 2008
Hello! Well, I hope you're getting ready for Christmas. It's approaching quickly. Discovery Station has Morse code, Titanic exhibits Discovery Station has a Morse code exhibit and a replica of the Titanic on display. The Morse code exhibit features a collection of telegraph keys and equipment of varied design and vintage, and related historic memorabilia on loan from NBC 25 News Director Mark Kraham. Included are visual excerpts demonstrating the communication of the telegraph used over the world for many decades.
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