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NEWS
December 5, 2000
Mining suit ruling could affect state's economy 12/5 This week a federal appeals court in Richmond, Va., will begin deliberations on a 1999 decision that could severely limit the coal-mining method known as "mountaintop removal. " The court's ruling won't have much physical impact on the Eastern Panhandle, but because coal revenues are still essential to the state's economy, the financial consequences could be significant. At issue is last's year's ruling by U.S. District Judge Charles Haden, which he stayed until an appeal could be heard, in support of a rule that bars mining activity within 100 feet of all but the smallest streams.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | heather.keels@herald-mail.com | June 7, 2011
A long-debated zoning overlay that will allow expansion of a Williamsport-area quarry got the green light Tuesday from the Washington County Board of Commissioners. Four of the five commissioners said they were in favor of approving an "industrial mineral" zoning overlay that will allow Martin Marietta Materials to mine an additional 77 acres west of the current Pinesburg Quarry. The previous board of county commissioners voted in 2009 to deny the zoning overlay, but a Washington County Circuit Court judge found the board's reasoning was inadequate and ordered the county to reconsider.
NEWS
By SCOTT BUTKI | December 14, 1999
The Washington County Commissioners Tuesday rejected a rezoning request for a Boonsboro limestone quarry, at least in part to send a message over a zoning violation. cont. from front page Martin Marietta Materials Inc. had requested an industrial mineral floating zone be added to the existing agricultural designation for 186 acres around the quarry on 20301 Benevola Church Road. The Raleigh, N.C.-based company said it wanted the industrial mining overlay in order to use the land for office and processing facilities, storage of materials and berm construction.
NEWS
By DAN KULIN /Staff Writer | September 17, 1999
Public hearing A proposal to amend the Washington County Zoning Ordinance to require mining companies to put fences around their quarries, and rezoning requests for 186 acres around the Boonsboro quarry, 113 acres near the Interstate 70 and the Sharpsburg Pike interchange and 1.74 acres near the intersection of Oak Ridge Drive and Maryland Route 65. Monday, Sept. 20 7 p.m. Court Room No. 1, Washington County Courthouse in Hagerstown. Hearings on a request to rezone about 186 acres near Boonsboro for mining activities and a proposal to require mining companies to surround their quarries with fences highlight a joint public session of the Washington County Commissioners and the County Planning Commission Monday.
NEWS
November 14, 2000
Commissioners OK Martin Marietta rezoning By SCOTT BUTKI / Staff Writer For the second time in less than a year, the Washington County Commissioners voted on a rezoning sought by Martin Marietta Materials Inc. This time, the County Commissioners approved the request on a vote of 4-1, with Commissioner John L. Schnebly opposed. In December 1999, the Washington County Commissioners voted 3-2 to deny the rezoning request for a Boonsboro limestone quarry, at least in part to send a message over a zoning violation.
NEWS
November 17, 2006
The Friends of the National Conservation Training Center will sponsor a cell phone recycling drive through Dec. 30 at several area places including the Ram's Den and outside room 304 of the Stutzman-Slonaker building at Shepherd University; Four Seasons Books, 116 W. German St.; collection box near lobby desk at Byrd Auditorium building at NCTC for NCTC employees and trainees only; Hillside Veterinary Clinic, 191 Augustine Ave., Charles Town, W.Va.;...
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | November 27, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - Bottom Road resident Billy Payne on Monday told Washington County officials that it feels like his house is crashing down when workers blast at the Pinesburg Quarry. And it could get worse, he said during a public hearing before the Washington County Commissioners and Washington County Planning Commission, if Martin Marietta Materials Inc. is given permission to expand its interests to mine 77 acres of land that borders the quarry to the north. Paxton Badham of Martin Marietta told county officials and about 60 people in attendance that rezoning the land north of the quarry would not increase mining intensity in that area.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | October 3, 2008
MARTINSBURG, W.VA. -- A cement manufacturer's announcement this week to end quarrying operations at a mining site east of Martinsburg might complicate a long-term plan to access millions of gallons of water for public consumption at the Blairton quarry property in Berkeley County. "We're going to have to look at it and see if we have to deal with Riverton (Corp.) or someone else," county legal counsel Norwood Bentley said of the potential ramifications of the decision by ESSROC.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | October 4, 2008
A cement manufacturer's announcement this week to end quarrying operations at a mining site east of Martinsburg might complicate a long-term plan to access millions of gallons of water for public consumption at the Blairton quarry property in Berkeley County. "We're going to have to look at it and see if we have to deal with Riverton (Corp.) or someone else," county legal counsel Norwood Bentley said of the potential ramifications of the decision by ESSROC. Riverton Corp., a subsidiary of Nazareth, Pa.-based ESSROC, will cease quarrying rock from the Blairton property off W.Va.
NEWS
by BOB MAGINNIS | July 11, 2002
In what seemed as much a pep talk as a speech, West Virginia Gov. Bob Wise this week told a group of Eastern Panhandle business and political leaders that the region might be in the running for a global corporation's new data center. Whether it happens or not, Wise's administration has many believing the state is ready to get beyond its "old economy" base of coal mining and manufacturing. First came Wise's decision to push through the legalization of video lottery games, which gave the state the financial breathing room to fund the PROMISE scholarship program.
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NEWS
By C.J. LOVELACE | cj.lovelace@herald-mail.com | August 18, 2013
A West Virginia company has been given the initial go-ahead to begin planning a waste-to-energy operation that would be built at Washington County's Forty West Landfill west of Hagerstown. The company, America First Inc., is headed by President Kevin Whited, who went before the Washington County Board of Commissioners on Aug. 6. The board voted 4-0 to give the planning process of the public-private partnership a green light. Commissioners President Terry L. Baker abstained from the vote, saying he did not have enough information to take a position one way or the other.
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NEWS
KAUSTUV BASU | kaustuv.basu@herald-mail.com | February 20, 2013
Del. John P. Donoghue, D-Washington, sent a text message Tuesday to a Republican legislator from Washington County, accusing him of meddling in his district. Donoghue sent the text message at 11:45 p.m. Tuesday to Del. Andrew A. Serafini, R-Washington, the chair of the county's legislative delegation. He copied the message to Del. LeRoy Myers, R-Allegany/Washington, a reporter and to some other phone numbers. In the text message, with the salutation “Hi Andy,” Donoghue wrote that he was “well aware of your efforts behind my back.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthewu@herald-mail.com | December 21, 2012
A circuit judge ruled Thursday that the state Surface Mine Board did not abuse its discretion and did not make an arbitrary decision when it affirmed the issue of a mining permit for a 100-acre quarry site in Gerrardstown, W.Va. Substantial evidence supports the Surface Mine Board's “rational” decision to affirm the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection's issuance of the permit to North Mountain Shale LLC, 23rd Judicial Circuit Judge John C. Yoder concluded in a 11-page order.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | May 11, 2012
Officials investigating a disease that kills bats have noticed a severe decline in a bat population in an abandoned cement mine in Washington County. The number of bats in the mine is the lowest since monitoring of the problem began in 1998, according to the National Park Service. White-nose syndrome - named for a white fungus that forms on the faces of infected bats  - was observed in the old cement mine during bat surveys conducted in March, according to a news release from the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | April 29, 2012
Authorities investigating a disease that kills bats have noticed a severe decline in a bat population in an abandoned cement mine in Washington County. The number of bats in the mine is the lowest since monitoring of the problem was started in 1998, according to the National Park Service. White-nose syndrome - named for a white fungus that forms on the faces of infected bats  - was observed in the old cement mine during bat surveys conducted last month, according to a news release from the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthew.umstead@herald-mail.com | February 22, 2012
Organizations opposed to a proposed shale quarry in southern Berkeley County have appealed a West Virginia Surface Mine Board decision affirming the state-issued permit for the operation. Potomac Riverkeeper Inc. announced Tuesday that it filed a petition in Berkeley County Circuit Court seeking judicial review of the Surface Mine Board's final order, which was issued Jan. 25. Joining Potomac Riverkeeper in the court appeal are Washington Heritage Trail Inc. and Gerrardstown (W.Va.)
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthew.umstead@herald-mail.com | February 8, 2012
An organization opposed to a proposed shale quarry in southern Berkeley County has criticized the West Virginia Surface Mine Board for affirming the state Department of Environmental Protection's decision to issue a mining permit for the operation. Potomac Riverkeeper Inc., one of three organizations that challenged the DEP's action to issue the mining permit to North Mountain Shale LLC, did not indicate Wednesday whether it would appeal the mine board's decision in circuit court.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | heather.keels@herald-mail.com | June 7, 2011
A long-debated zoning overlay that will allow expansion of a Williamsport-area quarry got the green light Tuesday from the Washington County Board of Commissioners. Four of the five commissioners said they were in favor of approving an "industrial mineral" zoning overlay that will allow Martin Marietta Materials to mine an additional 77 acres west of the current Pinesburg Quarry. The previous board of county commissioners voted in 2009 to deny the zoning overlay, but a Washington County Circuit Court judge found the board's reasoning was inadequate and ordered the county to reconsider.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthew.umstead@herald-mail.com | June 6, 2011
An appeal challenging the state's decision to issue a mining permit for a 100-acre quarry site in southwestern Berkeley County is not expected to be decided for several more weeks. West Virginia Assistant Attorney General Wendy Radcliff said Monday that a decision in the case between the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection and three organizations who appealed the DEP's decision to permit North Mountain Shale LLC to mine in Gerrardstown, W.Va., might not be made by the state Surface Mining Board until after late August or early September.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | September 21, 2010
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. -- In September 1921, 20,000 armed union coal miners tried to wrest a makeshift army of 10,000 mine operators and guards, nonunion miners and local "militia" off a mountain ridge near Logan, W.Va. Called "The Battle of Blair Mountain," it was one of several major incidents in the West Virginia mine wars of the 1920s. The violence got so bad that President Warren G. Harding sent in 500 U.S. Army troops to quell the insurrection. More than 700 miners were indicted for treason against the state.
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