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Minimum Wage

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NEWS
BY ANDREW SCHOTZ | December 26, 2004
andrews@herald-mail.com TRI-STATE - A minimum-wage paycheck falls well short of what many Tri-State residents need to cover rent, according to a study released Monday by the National Low Income Housing Coalition. The coalition's national report, called "Out of Reach 2004," looked at how people earning $5.15 an hour - the federal minimum wage - struggle to pay rent. "The National Low Income Housing Coalition once again must report that the cost of rental housing in the United States is out of reach of the vast majority of low wage earners and people who are elderly or disabled with public income benefits," the report's introduction says.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | January 18, 2011
Some Democratic state senators are pushing for phasing in an increase in Maryland's minimum wage from $7.25 to $10 over the next two years. Lawmakers and representatives from Progressive Maryland, a nonprofit advocacy group, said during a press conference Tuesday that the boost would help working families and stimulate the economy without hurting businesses. Rion Dennis, the executive director of Progressive Maryland, said a survey completed last month shows that the public supports the possible increase.
NEWS
January 22, 2013
Supporters of increasing Maryland's minimum wage want to raise it from $7.25 to $10 an hour by 2015. Sen. Rob Garagiola, D-Montgomery, and Delegate Aisha Braveboy, D-Prince George's, are sponsoring legislation. They joined supporters Tuesday in Annapolis. Supporters rallied outside the Maryland State House, holding signs that read: “we can't survive on $7.25” and chanting “raise the wage.” Garagiola says 19 states and the District of Columbia have a higher minimum wage than Maryland, which last raised the minimum wage in 2005.
NEWS
By CANDICE BOSELY | January 22, 2006
candiceb@herald-mail.com WASHINGTON COUNTY - It likely is not going to significantly fatten anyone's wallet, but starting next month, those making minimum wage will see an increase in their paychecks. A few local business owners had differing opinions on how increasing the minimum wage from $5.15 to $6.15 an hour will affect them. With dishes rattling in the background, Jamie Burtner said the increase could negatively affect operations at his two businesses, Red Byrd Restaurant and Keedysville Country Store.
NEWS
by DON AINES | January 14, 2007
TRI-STATE - The U.S. House of Representatives voted 315-116 last week to increase the federal minimum wage over two years from $5.15 to $7.25 an hour, but how people view the issue locally seems to depend on whether they are writing the paychecks or cashing them. Serving up coffee Saturday at the Cup O' Joe in Greencastle, Pa., Jodi Carbaugh said the other family-owned business, Wolf's Baked Goods, is considering buying a programmable mixer. "We won't need a skilled person if we buy the machine," Carbaugh said.
NEWS
By ARNOLD S. PLATOU | August 23, 2008
WASHINGTON COUNTY -- When Paula Hamby got her paycheck late last month and saw she had received a nearly 12 percent increase, she was really happy. Her pay had jumped 70 cents to $6.55 per hour. But the latest increase in the federal minimum wage that has so delighted the 55-year-old Hagerstown woman also is the latest economic blow to many employers. "For the restaurant industry, this is a perfect storm situation," said Melvin Thompson, vice president of government relations for the Restaurant Association of Maryland.
OPINION
January 29, 2011
Wage law won't help   To the editor: Advocates of a minimum wage increase in Maryland claim it will help stimulate the state economy (“ Md. minimum wage increase proposed ,” Jan. 18). They may wish that were the case, but the economic evidence shows otherwise.   New research from Dr. Joseph Sabia, a labor economist at West Point, demonstrates that past increases in the minimum wage have had no positive effect on overall economic growth — and can even have a negative effect on the output of certain industries that employ less-experienced employees.
OPINION
By TOM FIREY | April 10, 2013
President Obama and some lawmakers in Washington and Annapolis have called for increasing the minimum wage, saying it would help the working poor. So far, those calls have gained little support, even on the left: Legislation to raise Maryland's minimum wage was rejected by a state senate committee and federal legislation languishes in a U.S. Senate committee. That's just as well, because raising the minimum wage is a feeble way to aid the working poor - and might be counterproductive. Besides, there's a better way for government to help them.
NEWS
August 14, 2006
Last week's question Martin O'Malley has challenged his Republican rival for the Maryland governor's office to urge President Bush to back a higher minimum wage. Gov. Robert Ehrlich says that's not the best way to fight poverty. Who's right and why? Gov. Ehrlich is correct. The number of workers earning the minimum is a very low percentage and of that percentage, most are teenagers still residing at home with mom and dad. The others are receiving some form of government assistance.
NEWS
by Zap2it.com | May 4, 2005
Morgan Spurlock created the documentary series "30 Days" for FX. He's also going to be the show's first subject. The show, in which people live a lifestyle they've never experienced before for a month, is set to premiere June 15. Episodes will follow a Christian who lives as a Muslim for 30 days and a conservative straight man who moves in with a gay roommate. Before that, though, Spurlock, who documented his McDonald's-only diet in the film "Super Size Me," will try to live on minimum wage for 30 days.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
September 10, 2013
Where will minimum wages end?   To the editor: We need a $15 minimum wage. Got your attention? Yes, the part-time entry-level workers need to be paid $15 an hour despite the fact that this is probably their first job, with no skills, learning to arise in time to go to work. When that wage is put into place from the $7.25 now in effect, those making $10 will want a raise to $17.50. They have developed skills and have some work experience. Those making $15 an hour won't be satisfied having some trainee making the same as they are after they spent time developing skills, habits, etc. And so on it goes.
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NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | September 1, 2013
Labor Day has a deeper meaning for some area workers than just a day of recognition and time off from work. Guy Greene of Hagerstown said that as workers are honored on Labor Day, it is important to remember the U.S. soldiers fighting overseas because they don't get to take the holiday off. “I'm retired from the military, so I know what it is to work every weekend and every holiday,” he said. “I've got to give them pride and thank them for it.” Frank Wiley of Hagerstown, who served in Vietnam, said members of the military should be recognized on Labor Day. “They need to recognize more for the troops than they are doing now,” he said.
OPINION
By GEORGE MICHAEL | July 19, 2013
The Washington, D.C., city council voted 8-5 on July 10 to require Walmart to pay a “living wage” of $12.50 per hour for all employees at the six new stores that Walmart is preparing to open in our nation's capital. Three stores are under construction and three more have been approved. This living wage is nearly 50 percent higher than the current D.C. minimum wage of $8.25 per hour.   This move by the council puts Mayor Vincent Gray in a bind. He worked out the deal to get Walmart to take a chance and invest in the city.
OPINION
By TOM FIREY | April 10, 2013
President Obama and some lawmakers in Washington and Annapolis have called for increasing the minimum wage, saying it would help the working poor. So far, those calls have gained little support, even on the left: Legislation to raise Maryland's minimum wage was rejected by a state senate committee and federal legislation languishes in a U.S. Senate committee. That's just as well, because raising the minimum wage is a feeble way to aid the working poor - and might be counterproductive. Besides, there's a better way for government to help them.
OPINION
February 17, 2013
“Come on, Maryland, do what's right and raise the minimum wage to $10, which still isn't close to a decent wage. Also, step up and include restaurant workers, who have to rely on tips to come close to a decent wage. Give a waitress or waiter a minimum wage, and my tip will be for exceptional service.” - Waynesboro, Pa. “I'm from Fairplay. I've lived in here for 60-some years. Now we're saying Mr. Lewis wants to put a truck down at the ag center, and willing to put out $121 to $290-some thousand dollars, when we have a fire company in our community that should be open.
NEWS
January 22, 2013
Supporters of increasing Maryland's minimum wage want to raise it from $7.25 to $10 an hour by 2015. Sen. Rob Garagiola, D-Montgomery, and Delegate Aisha Braveboy, D-Prince George's, are sponsoring legislation. They joined supporters Tuesday in Annapolis. Supporters rallied outside the Maryland State House, holding signs that read: “we can't survive on $7.25” and chanting “raise the wage.” Garagiola says 19 states and the District of Columbia have a higher minimum wage than Maryland, which last raised the minimum wage in 2005.
EDUCATION
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | August 19, 2012
After spending the summer working through a youth program at Battery One Inc. on Virginia Avenue in Hagerstown, Rodney Tennant was offered a part-time job there. “I wanted to do something with lifting a lot of weights,” said Tennant, of Hagerstown. “I've liked working here.” Tennant, 18, began working at Battery One Inc. through the Western Maryland Consortium Summer Youth Program, which provides work opportunities for financially disadvantaged youths ages 14 to 21. A spring graduate of North Hagerstown High School, Tennant works two part-time jobs, sometimes logging up to 70 hours a week between the two. He accepted the part-time job offer at Battery One, which sells services and installs batteries for a variety of items, from cars to cellphones.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | February 29, 2012
Editor's note: This is one in an series of occasional profiles about candidates running for election in the 6th Congressional District. When Ron Little looked at the candidate pool for Maryland's 6th Congressional District seat, he said: “I had a strong feeling that maybe voices like mine weren't being heard or weren't being represented.” “I'm just a regular guy,” he said. “I like to think that I'm fairly intelligent, but I also have the same struggles that a lot of people have - educating our children, balancing social (and)
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