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NEWS
April 15, 2010
WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Barack Obama ordered an exhaustive federal review of coal mine safety Thursday and asked Congress to strengthen existing laws "riddled with loopholes. " "We can't just hold mining companies accountable. We have to hold Washington accountable," the president said in response to the April 5 underground explosion at a Massey Energy Co. mine in West Virginia where 29 miners were killed. "We need to take a hard look at our own practices and our own procedures," Obama told reporters in the Rose Garden.
NEWS
By Dan Dearth | July 2, 2007
A Hagerstown man was listed in critical condition Monday at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center in Baltimore after he was burned while working on a piece of equipment almost two weeks ago at St. Lawrence Cement. Bob Klinger, the human resources manager at St. Lawrence Cement, said last week that Kevin Molloy, 58, suffered significant burns. No one else was injured. A spokeswoman from the federal Mine Safety and Health Administration said Monday that she could not contact investigators to confirm whether an investigation of the accident was complete.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | January 5, 2006
charlestown@herald-mail.com SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. - When J. Davitt McAteer analyzes what went wrong in this week's deadly coal mine disaster in Tallmansville, W.Va., he goes to a familiar area: federal and state mine safety laws. It's an area the Shepherdstown attorney knows well. After 78 men were killed in a coal mine disaster near his home in Farmington, W.Va., in 1968, McAteer teamed with consumer rights advocate Ralph Nader to write a mine safety report. McAteer said the Farmington disaster hit him hard because many of the dead were fathers and friends of families he knew.
NEWS
By DAVID DISHNEAU | April 21, 2007
BARTON, Md. - Workers on Friday found the bodies of two miners who were buried for three days beneath the collapsed wall of an open-pit coal mine in Western Maryland, a federal mine official said. Their remains were found in the cabs of the battered backhoe and bulldozer the men were operating at the bottom of the mine Tuesday when part the 150-foot high wall crumbled, filling the pit with at least 45 feet of rocks and dirt, said Bob Cornett, acting regional director for the federal Mine Safety and Health Administration.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | June 27, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - The Mine Safety and Health Administration is investigating the cause of an accident that left a man burned last Thursday while he was working at St. Lawrence Cement in Hagerstown. During a telephone interview on Tuesday with the Herald-Mail, a family member of victim Kevin Molloy said she did not want to go on the record, but was willing to confirm that Molloy is 58 years old and from Hagerstown. Molloy was listed in critical condition Tuesday afternoon at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center in Baltimore, a hospital spokeswoman said.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | February 5, 2008
SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. - Initial reports claimed that 362 miners died, but that number had been questioned. Davitt McAteer was curious, too, and for 30 years, he conducted research into a set of explosions at the Monongah coal mine near Fairmont, W.Va. McAteer, a Shepherdstown attorney who is considered an international expert in mine safety, also examined interviews with victims, survivors and descendants of those who were killed. McAteer sifted through U.S. Bureau of Mines information and newspaper interviews and reaches the conclusion in a new book that nearly 500 miners died in the catastrophe at Monongah mine on Dec. 6, 1907.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | August 21, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - The condition of a Hagerstown man who was burned during a June accident at St. Lawrence Cement has improved, a relative of the man said. Kevin Molloy, 58, was transferred late last week from the burn unit at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center to Good Samaritan Hospital in Baltimore for rehabilitation, said his cousin, Jan Buxton. "It's a miracle," Buxton said. Molloy suffered respiratory injuries, and first-, second- and third-degree burns over 50 percent to 60 percent of his body when an explosion of steam, hot gases and dust occurred in a kiln June 21, according to information provided by the Mine Safety and Health Administration.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | July 10, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - St. Lawrence Cement was issued five citations by the Mine Safety and Health Administration in connection with the company's response to a June 21 accident when a worker was severely burned, the federal agency said Monday. MSHA spokesman Dirk Fillpot said the administration had not decided whether to fine the Hagerstown cement company. Kevin Molloy, 58, of Hagerstown, suffered respiratory injuries, and first-, second- and third-degree burns over 50 percent to 60 percent of his body when an explosion of steam, hot gases and hot dust occurred in a kiln, according to information in the citations.
NEWS
April 16, 2010
CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) -- Federal inspectors have found more than 60 serious safety violations at Massey Energy operations since the explosion that killed 29 miners at the company's Upper Big Branch mine, federal mine safety records show. A widow of one of the men has filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the company, claiming that the mine's history of safety violations amounted to negligence. Inspectors visited more than 30 underground Massey coal mines in West Virginia, Kentucky and Virginia after the April 5 blast, according to records from the Mine Safety and Health Administration.
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NEWS
April 16, 2010
CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) -- Federal inspectors have found more than 60 serious safety violations at Massey Energy operations since the explosion that killed 29 miners at the company's Upper Big Branch mine, federal mine safety records show. A widow of one of the men has filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the company, claiming that the mine's history of safety violations amounted to negligence. Inspectors visited more than 30 underground Massey coal mines in West Virginia, Kentucky and Virginia after the April 5 blast, according to records from the Mine Safety and Health Administration.
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NEWS
April 15, 2010
WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Barack Obama ordered an exhaustive federal review of coal mine safety Thursday and asked Congress to strengthen existing laws "riddled with loopholes. " "We can't just hold mining companies accountable. We have to hold Washington accountable," the president said in response to the April 5 underground explosion at a Massey Energy Co. mine in West Virginia where 29 miners were killed. "We need to take a hard look at our own practices and our own procedures," Obama told reporters in the Rose Garden.
NEWS
April 15, 2009
Renew the fight for worker safety To the editor: Workers Memorial Day will again be observed on Tuesday, April 28, a day on which workers remember those who have been killed or injured on the job and renew the fight for strong health and safety protections. More than three decades ago, the Occupational Safety and Health Act and Mine Safety and Health Act, passed by Congress, purported to give every worker the right to a safe job. With other allies, we in the labor movement have fought for that promise to become a reality - winning protections that saved hundreds of thousands of lives.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | February 5, 2008
SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. - Initial reports claimed that 362 miners died, but that number had been questioned. Davitt McAteer was curious, too, and for 30 years, he conducted research into a set of explosions at the Monongah coal mine near Fairmont, W.Va. McAteer, a Shepherdstown attorney who is considered an international expert in mine safety, also examined interviews with victims, survivors and descendants of those who were killed. McAteer sifted through U.S. Bureau of Mines information and newspaper interviews and reaches the conclusion in a new book that nearly 500 miners died in the catastrophe at Monongah mine on Dec. 6, 1907.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | August 21, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - The condition of a Hagerstown man who was burned during a June accident at St. Lawrence Cement has improved, a relative of the man said. Kevin Molloy, 58, was transferred late last week from the burn unit at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center to Good Samaritan Hospital in Baltimore for rehabilitation, said his cousin, Jan Buxton. "It's a miracle," Buxton said. Molloy suffered respiratory injuries, and first-, second- and third-degree burns over 50 percent to 60 percent of his body when an explosion of steam, hot gases and dust occurred in a kiln June 21, according to information provided by the Mine Safety and Health Administration.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | July 10, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - St. Lawrence Cement was issued five citations by the Mine Safety and Health Administration in connection with the company's response to a June 21 accident when a worker was severely burned, the federal agency said Monday. MSHA spokesman Dirk Fillpot said the administration had not decided whether to fine the Hagerstown cement company. Kevin Molloy, 58, of Hagerstown, suffered respiratory injuries, and first-, second- and third-degree burns over 50 percent to 60 percent of his body when an explosion of steam, hot gases and hot dust occurred in a kiln, according to information in the citations.
NEWS
By Dan Dearth | July 2, 2007
A Hagerstown man was listed in critical condition Monday at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center in Baltimore after he was burned while working on a piece of equipment almost two weeks ago at St. Lawrence Cement. Bob Klinger, the human resources manager at St. Lawrence Cement, said last week that Kevin Molloy, 58, suffered significant burns. No one else was injured. A spokeswoman from the federal Mine Safety and Health Administration said Monday that she could not contact investigators to confirm whether an investigation of the accident was complete.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | June 27, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - The Mine Safety and Health Administration is investigating the cause of an accident that left a man burned last Thursday while he was working at St. Lawrence Cement in Hagerstown. During a telephone interview on Tuesday with the Herald-Mail, a family member of victim Kevin Molloy said she did not want to go on the record, but was willing to confirm that Molloy is 58 years old and from Hagerstown. Molloy was listed in critical condition Tuesday afternoon at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center in Baltimore, a hospital spokeswoman said.
NEWS
By DAVID DISHNEAU | April 21, 2007
BARTON, Md. - Workers on Friday found the bodies of two miners who were buried for three days beneath the collapsed wall of an open-pit coal mine in Western Maryland, a federal mine official said. Their remains were found in the cabs of the battered backhoe and bulldozer the men were operating at the bottom of the mine Tuesday when part the 150-foot high wall crumbled, filling the pit with at least 45 feet of rocks and dirt, said Bob Cornett, acting regional director for the federal Mine Safety and Health Administration.
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