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NEWS
By MARIE GILBERT | September 12, 2009
WASHINGTON COUNTY -- It was the autumn of 1862, and Gen. Robert E. Lee was on the move. Pointing his Confederate army toward Maryland, he decided to divide his forces -- sending some to Harpers Ferry while he headed to South Mountain to spar with Union Gen. George B. McClellan. Eventually, battle lines were drawn along Antietam Creek. And in the misty dawn of Sept. 17, Union artillery crashed into a cornfield where rebel soldiers crouched. "Again and again, the field was lost and recovered, until the green corn that grew upon it looked as if it had been struck by a storm of bloody hail," a survivor recalled.
NEWS
by ERIN JULIUS | December 29, 2006
HAGERSTOWN - Philip Mayhue walks up to strangers of a certain age and asks if they have served. Often, the men he speaks to sign a cloth-bound book Philip keeps as a memento. In his closet hang World War II-era Navy and Army dress uniforms. A combat helmet sits on the shelf. Philip keeps a defused mortar, gas mask and Hitler-issued German coins in a trunk. It's safe to say that Philip, 14, is fascinated by World War II. "This was reality, this wasn't a game," Philip said.
NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com | February 24, 2012
As the first African-American woman to achieve the rank of major general in the U.S. Army, Marcia M. Anderson helped inspire Letterkenny Army Depot employees Friday as they observed Black History Month. In a keynote speech focusing on “Black Women in American Culture and History,” the 30-year career soldier spoke of her personal philosophy for success. “It's not your ZIP code or your family history that determines where you end up in life so much as what's in your heart and what's in your brain,” Anderson told Letterkenny employees.
NEWS
By CRYSTAL SCHELLE | December 3, 2008
Stephen Budiansky, author of "The Bloody Shirt: Terror After Appomattox," has penned more than 10 books over the years. Yet he said he's not the type of writer to rise at dawn every morning to pound out a thousand words before lunch. When writing nonfiction - specifically military history - Budianksy said the first step is always research. "I start with a lot of background," he said in a telephone interview from his Leesburg, Va., home. For "The Bloody Shirt," Budiansky poured over newspaper accounts and original documents at several locations, including Mississippi State University, South Carolina State Archive, Duke University and the University of Virginia.
NEWS
February 24, 2003
Cpl. William O. Wilson has long been believed to be the only Medal of Honor recipient from Washington County. But information on the U.S. Army Center of Military History's Web site suggests there are at least two others. First Sgt. Clay Beauford was cited for "gallant conduct during campaigns and engagements with Apaches" during the winter of 1872-73. Beauford was born in Washington County and joined Company B, 5th U.S. Cavalry. Clear Spring native Cpl. John W. Wagner received the medal in 1894 at age 50 for his service at Vicksburg, Miss.
NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | January 24, 2006
HAGERSTOWN tiffanya@herald-mail.com Florence Miles has at least 50 books about World War II under her bed, and she expects to add one more to the stack this summer. Only this time, Miles will be featured in it. Miles, 83, of Hagerstown, is one of more than 60 people to share war stories with The Herald-Mail Co. since the company started collecting material last month for its latest book. The Herald-Mail plans to publish "Our Country Called: A Tribute to Washington County Servicemen and Servicewomen" this summer.
NEWS
August 20, 1998
By BRENDAN KIRBY / Staff Writer photos: KEVIN G. GILBERT / staff photographer FORT RITCHIE - The Maryland National Guard recovered part of its history Wednesday, taking about 500 artifacts from Fort Ritchie that date back to the base's days as a National Guard training camp. "It's a happy day for the National Guard to recapture part of our history," said National Guard Col. Howard S. Freedlander during a ceremony in which the Army signed over the items.
NEWS
May 24, 2012
Commissioners pass resolution for fire cleanup, repairs The Franklin County (Pa.) Commissioners on Thursday passed an emergency resolution that will allow for repairs and cleanup following a May 17 fire in their building. Sparks from demolition of an adjacent building ignited the commissioners' office building at 14 N. Main St. The second-floor meeting room and two offices sustained “extensive water damage,” County Administrator John Hart said Thursday.
LIFESTYLE
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | June 21, 2013
There has been nothing like it before or since in American history - father against son, brother against brother, a horrible strife that divided families as well as states. The Civil War changed America profoundly, “leaving us a different people in everything,” said a New York Times editorial. It also was the stuff of legend. Generals became larger than life, battle stories grew to mythical proportions and the Civil War captured the national imagination. A century and a half after the last shots were fired, the battle between North and South remains in the American consciousness.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | June 10, 2012
Lt. Col. Joseph Gardenhour talked Sunday about being separated from his family during his time in theU.S. Air Force, including being away from his son for eight months after the boy was born. Gardenhour also talked about his wife being separated from both of their children during her time in the U.S. Air Force, and said the scenario is common among military members. Gardenhour, a Smithsburg High School graduate, said repeated deployments for military members in recent years have been stressful for the individuals involved, but he feels confident that the military is meeting their needs.
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LIFESTYLE
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | June 21, 2013
There has been nothing like it before or since in American history - father against son, brother against brother, a horrible strife that divided families as well as states. The Civil War changed America profoundly, “leaving us a different people in everything,” said a New York Times editorial. It also was the stuff of legend. Generals became larger than life, battle stories grew to mythical proportions and the Civil War captured the national imagination. A century and a half after the last shots were fired, the battle between North and South remains in the American consciousness.
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NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | June 10, 2012
Lt. Col. Joseph Gardenhour talked Sunday about being separated from his family during his time in theU.S. Air Force, including being away from his son for eight months after the boy was born. Gardenhour also talked about his wife being separated from both of their children during her time in the U.S. Air Force, and said the scenario is common among military members. Gardenhour, a Smithsburg High School graduate, said repeated deployments for military members in recent years have been stressful for the individuals involved, but he feels confident that the military is meeting their needs.
NEWS
May 24, 2012
Commissioners pass resolution for fire cleanup, repairs The Franklin County (Pa.) Commissioners on Thursday passed an emergency resolution that will allow for repairs and cleanup following a May 17 fire in their building. Sparks from demolition of an adjacent building ignited the commissioners' office building at 14 N. Main St. The second-floor meeting room and two offices sustained “extensive water damage,” County Administrator John Hart said Thursday.
NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com | February 24, 2012
As the first African-American woman to achieve the rank of major general in the U.S. Army, Marcia M. Anderson helped inspire Letterkenny Army Depot employees Friday as they observed Black History Month. In a keynote speech focusing on “Black Women in American Culture and History,” the 30-year career soldier spoke of her personal philosophy for success. “It's not your ZIP code or your family history that determines where you end up in life so much as what's in your heart and what's in your brain,” Anderson told Letterkenny employees.
NEWS
By MARIE GILBERT | September 12, 2009
WASHINGTON COUNTY -- It was the autumn of 1862, and Gen. Robert E. Lee was on the move. Pointing his Confederate army toward Maryland, he decided to divide his forces -- sending some to Harpers Ferry while he headed to South Mountain to spar with Union Gen. George B. McClellan. Eventually, battle lines were drawn along Antietam Creek. And in the misty dawn of Sept. 17, Union artillery crashed into a cornfield where rebel soldiers crouched. "Again and again, the field was lost and recovered, until the green corn that grew upon it looked as if it had been struck by a storm of bloody hail," a survivor recalled.
NEWS
By CRYSTAL SCHELLE | December 3, 2008
Stephen Budiansky, author of "The Bloody Shirt: Terror After Appomattox," has penned more than 10 books over the years. Yet he said he's not the type of writer to rise at dawn every morning to pound out a thousand words before lunch. When writing nonfiction - specifically military history - Budianksy said the first step is always research. "I start with a lot of background," he said in a telephone interview from his Leesburg, Va., home. For "The Bloody Shirt," Budiansky poured over newspaper accounts and original documents at several locations, including Mississippi State University, South Carolina State Archive, Duke University and the University of Virginia.
NEWS
by ERIN JULIUS | December 29, 2006
HAGERSTOWN - Philip Mayhue walks up to strangers of a certain age and asks if they have served. Often, the men he speaks to sign a cloth-bound book Philip keeps as a memento. In his closet hang World War II-era Navy and Army dress uniforms. A combat helmet sits on the shelf. Philip keeps a defused mortar, gas mask and Hitler-issued German coins in a trunk. It's safe to say that Philip, 14, is fascinated by World War II. "This was reality, this wasn't a game," Philip said.
NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | January 24, 2006
HAGERSTOWN tiffanya@herald-mail.com Florence Miles has at least 50 books about World War II under her bed, and she expects to add one more to the stack this summer. Only this time, Miles will be featured in it. Miles, 83, of Hagerstown, is one of more than 60 people to share war stories with The Herald-Mail Co. since the company started collecting material last month for its latest book. The Herald-Mail plans to publish "Our Country Called: A Tribute to Washington County Servicemen and Servicewomen" this summer.
NEWS
by BRIAN SHAPPELL | January 10, 2005
shappell@herald-mail.com CASCADE - There was no red carpet, no fancy sound system, no pool of tabloid newspaper photographers and no actresses wearing million-dollar diamond necklaces in Cascade on Sunday afternoon. There were, however, a lot of enormously proud locals, military veterans and history buffs from as far away as Ohio at the only public showing of "The Ritchie Boys" at the Fort Ritchie gymnasium. "The Ritchie Boys," one of 12 documentaries vying for an Oscar nod this year, was played twice at the former U.S. Army base to a crowd of hundreds, which packed into two showings.
NEWS
February 24, 2003
Cpl. William O. Wilson has long been believed to be the only Medal of Honor recipient from Washington County. But information on the U.S. Army Center of Military History's Web site suggests there are at least two others. First Sgt. Clay Beauford was cited for "gallant conduct during campaigns and engagements with Apaches" during the winter of 1872-73. Beauford was born in Washington County and joined Company B, 5th U.S. Cavalry. Clear Spring native Cpl. John W. Wagner received the medal in 1894 at age 50 for his service at Vicksburg, Miss.
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