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NEWS
November 13, 1997
Medical waste plant proposed By STEVEN T. DENNIS Staff Writer A subsidiary of a Louisiana-based company wants permission to build a plant where up to 75 tons of infectious medical waste, including body parts and used syringes, would be sterilized daily. Tempico Mid-Atlantic LLC wants to build the proposed $4 million plant in the Washington County Business Park on Western Maryland Parkway near the interchange of Interstate 81 and U.S. 40. The project has the backing of the Washington County Commissioners, who have signed a contract to sell the company six acres at the park, pending zoning approvals.
NEWS
November 19, 1997
County rejects medical waste plant By STEVEN T. DENNIS Staff Writer Plans for a medical waste treatment plant that would have sterilized 75 tons a day of infectious body parts, used syringes and other materials went up in smoke Tuesday after the Washington County Commissioners reversed themselves and voted to withdraw their support. About 60 county residents packed a 10 a.m. public hearing to speak against the plan, with some suggesting the commissioners were "insane" for supporting the plant.
NEWS
November 15, 1997
What is Tempico? Tempico Mid-Atlantic LLC of Virginia Beach, Va., is a partially owned subsidiary of Tempico Inc., a Lousiana-based company that manufactures medical waste disposal equipment and equipment for paper mills. The company said its technology has been used in hospitals in the United States and Spain since 1992. The proposed Hagerstown facility would be their first regional medical waste treatment plant. What medical waste could the facility accept?
NEWS
February 20, 1998
HARRISBURG (AP) - A Greencastle, Pa., firm's plan to build the East Coast's largest medical-waste processing plant near a predominantly black housing project in Harrisburg has prompted civil-rights leaders to accuse city leaders of "environmental racism. " "They don't put these things in upper-class neighborhoods," Charles Chivis, president of the local NAACP chapter, told The Philadelphia Inquirer. Proponents, who include two city councilors with financial ties to the company that wants to build the facility, insist it would not endanger the health of its neighbors and that the criticism is unwarranted.
NEWS
November 15, 1997
Want to voice your opinion? Two public hearings are scheduled for the Tempico Mid-Atlantic LLC medical waste treatment plant. The County Commissioners have to amend their solid waste management plan to include Tempico, a requirement for new waste processing facilities. The commissioners will hold a public hearing on the amendment Tuesday at 10 a.m. in the commissioners meeting room at 100 W. Washington St. The Board of Zoning Appeals also must approve the proposal, because medical waste treatment plants are not a primary permitted use in the zoning ordinance.
NEWS
By SCOTT BUTKI | May 23, 2000
The Washington County Hospital Association has received a state permit to expand its waste incinerator operation to accept waste from outside sources. Mary Egan, a resident who lives across the street from the hospital, spoke against the change at a Nov. 30, 1999, public hearing. Egan does not think it makes sense for an incinerator in the middle of a residential area to accept and burn waste from sources other than the hospital, she said last week. At this point, only the Western Maryland Health Center in Hagerstown has contacted the hospital about incinerating its medical waste, said Randy Sharshan, the hospital facilities executive who oversees the incinerator operation.
NEWS
November 26, 1997
By RICHARD F. BELISLE Staff Writer, Waynesboro GREENCASTLE, Pa. - A Greencastle businessman, one of 31 from Pennsylvania leaving Friday on a trade mission to Japan and the Far East, said he sees opportunity in the financial turmoil that is ripping through the Pacific Rim nations. John Moran, owner of Bio-Oxidation Inc., maker of the Bio-Oxidizer, a machine that safely disposes of medical waste, is seeking a joint venture deal in Japan. Moran developed the Bio-Oxidizer to recycle medical waste.
NEWS
November 15, 1997
By STEVEN T. DENNIS and BRENDAN KIRBY Staff Writers The prospect of 25 trucks full of body parts, blood, contaminated carcasses and other wastes barreling over Washington County roads each day has concerned some area residents, but members of the hazardous materials team said they are prepared for the risks. Tempico Mid-Atlantic LLC of Virginia Beach, Va., has applied for permission to build a 75-ton per day treatment plant on Western Maryland Parkway just off the Interstate 81/U.
NEWS
November 18, 1997
Editorial - County can do better Is this the best Washington County can get? That's the question that comes to mind when we consider the proposal to site a company that processes hazardous medical waste on six acres in the Washington County Business Park. In return for accepting 25 trucks full of body parts and other medical waste traveling on county roads each day, the county will get 50 jobs. But W. Doyle Payne Jr., part owner and managing partner of Tempico Mid-Atlantic LLC, won't say how much those jobs will pay, or how many will be skilled as opposed to unskilled labor.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 18, 2009
The Washington County Division of Environmental Management, Solid Waste Department, will sponsor a Household Hazardous Waste Day for residents on Saturday, June 6, from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m., at the 40 West Landfill at 12630 Earth Care Road, one mile west of Huyett's Crossroads on U.S. 40 west. There will be no charge to Washington County residents to participate. All items must be from a residence and not from a business or home-based business, according to a release from the the county.
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NEWS
By TRISH RUDDER | March 14, 2008
BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.Va. - Bloody gauze, needle tips and used finger sticks called lancets were among the hazardous medical waste materials found Thursday morning on properties along U.S. 522, the main road through town. Lee Fowler, Morgan County Health Department administrator, said the incident is under investigation and might be an act of vandalism. Fowler said a town resident came to the health department Thursday morning to report medical waste material was found in her yard, a neighbor's yard and another yard.
NEWS
by ANDREW SCHOTZ | September 10, 2003
andrews@herald-mail.com The Hagerstown-Washington County Economic Development Commission on Tuesday again lobbied the city government to stop fighting Washington County Hospital's move to Robinwood Drive. EDC Chairwoman Peggy Bushey said the city should make the hospital relocation "a very positive change" and consider the property left behind as "a true revenue source. " Councilmen Kristin Aleshire and Lewis Metzner said the city is not fighting the move, but rather raising legitimate logistical questions.
NEWS
September 7, 2000
Medical waste spilled By KIMBERLY YAKOWSKI / Staff Writer LEITERSBURG - Used dental needles, cotton swabs, used paper towels, soiled surgical gloves and notes with patient information fell off a waste hauler's truck along Leitersburg Pike Thursday evening, Maryland State Police said. Police were notified of the spill by a resident who had noticed the debris on his property and along the shoulder of the road near Hagerstown Cinema 10, Cpl. B. L. Townes Jr said.
NEWS
By SCOTT BUTKI | May 23, 2000
The Washington County Hospital Association has received a state permit to expand its waste incinerator operation to accept waste from outside sources. Mary Egan, a resident who lives across the street from the hospital, spoke against the change at a Nov. 30, 1999, public hearing. Egan does not think it makes sense for an incinerator in the middle of a residential area to accept and burn waste from sources other than the hospital, she said last week. At this point, only the Western Maryland Health Center in Hagerstown has contacted the hospital about incinerating its medical waste, said Randy Sharshan, the hospital facilities executive who oversees the incinerator operation.
NEWS
April 8, 1998
Trash must be placed in front of residence by 7 a.m. Small items should be placed in containers. Any trash cans set out will be picked up as trash. The following items will not be picked up: tires, batteries, gas tanks, oil tanks, propane tanks, barrels, drums, buckets, paint cans, explosives, radioactive material, construction/building materials, household hazardous waste, wood waste, yard trimmings, limbs/grass & leaves, dirt/rocks/sod, commercial waste, industrial waste, medical waste.
NEWS
February 20, 1998
HARRISBURG (AP) - A Greencastle, Pa., firm's plan to build the East Coast's largest medical-waste processing plant near a predominantly black housing project in Harrisburg has prompted civil-rights leaders to accuse city leaders of "environmental racism. " "They don't put these things in upper-class neighborhoods," Charles Chivis, president of the local NAACP chapter, told The Philadelphia Inquirer. Proponents, who include two city councilors with financial ties to the company that wants to build the facility, insist it would not endanger the health of its neighbors and that the criticism is unwarranted.
NEWS
February 14, 1998
By CLYDE FORD Staff Writer BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.Va. - A debate over whether a medical waste treatment plant should be built in the Paw Paw Industrial Park has divided Morgan County residents. "We're separated by two mountain ranges and a world of indifference," said Paw Paw Mayor Helena Moser, who supports the plant. Moser said the 25 to 50 jobs that the plant would create are needed in Paw Paw, where flooding in the 1980s wiped out manufacturing plants. "We don't know why people who don't even go into Paw Paw should decide what we have for jobs," said Moser, who like many Paw Paw residents travels 35 miles to Winchester, Va., for work.
NEWS
November 26, 1997
By RICHARD F. BELISLE Staff Writer, Waynesboro GREENCASTLE, Pa. - A Greencastle businessman, one of 31 from Pennsylvania leaving Friday on a trade mission to Japan and the Far East, said he sees opportunity in the financial turmoil that is ripping through the Pacific Rim nations. John Moran, owner of Bio-Oxidation Inc., maker of the Bio-Oxidizer, a machine that safely disposes of medical waste, is seeking a joint venture deal in Japan. Moran developed the Bio-Oxidizer to recycle medical waste.
NEWS
November 21, 1997
Mail Call Editor's note - Please be as brief as possible when calling Mail Call, The Daily Mail's reader call-in line. Mail Call is not staffed on weekends or holidays so it is best to call Mail Call weekdays at 301-791-6236. Readers are welcome to leave their recorded message on any topic they choose, but some calls are screened out. Here are some of the calls we have received lately: "This is in response to the Mail Call listed in Tuesday's paper about teachers and officials needing to be held accountable for the dropout rate.
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