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NEWS
BY Christine L. Moats | April 1, 2002
Q: What can I do to prepare for my first doctor's visit without one of my parents? A: To be prepared, do the following: Bring your medical records or have them transferred from your previous doctor's office. Bring your insurance card with you to your visit. Arrive early for your first visit as you will most likely have to fill out paperwork. If you haven't been feeling well, make a list of the symptoms you've been experiencing to share with your doctor. Write down any questions or concerns that you would like to discuss with the doctor.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | May 26, 2007
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Berkeley County Sheriff W. Randy Smith said Friday he is waiting for the results of an autopsy on a 2-year-old Martinsburg-area boy whose death Thursday morning is being considered suspicious. "Everything's at a standstill at this point," Smith said. Emergency officials initially received a report on Thursday about 11 a.m. that the child was in cardiac arrest and EMS crews could not revive the child. The boy's mother and grandmother did not wish to have the name of the boy released on Thursday.
NEWS
July 14, 2003
The IDEA Health & Fitness Association suggests asking these questions when interviewing potential personal trainers: What is your exercise and educational background? Are you certified by a nationally recognized organization? What is your level of training experience? How do you keep current on the latest training techniques, research and trends? Are you certified in CPR and first aid? Do you require a health screening or release from my doctor?
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSLEY | July 20, 2005
martinsburg@herald-mail.com MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Police called to a secluded, wooded area where a body was found Tuesday night on the mountain behind Poor House Road believe the death likely was accidental, officials said. The unidentified man's body was found at 7:46 p.m. about a mile away from a house at 4681 Poor House Road, outside of Martinsburg. Police had to use a four-wheeler to get to the spot, Berkeley County Sheriff's Department Chief Deputy Kenneth Lemaster said.
NEWS
by Christine L. Moats | March 31, 2003
Q: What is muscular dystrophy? A: According to the Muscular Dystrophy Association, the term muscular dystrophy refers to a group of genetic diseases marked by progressive weakness and degeneration of the skeletal or voluntary muscles which control movement. The muscles of the heart and some other involuntary muscles are also affected in some forms of muscular dystrophy, and a few forms involve other organs as well. Muscular dystrophy can affect people of all ages. Although some forms first become apparent in infancy or childhood, others may not appear until middle age or later.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | October 29, 2007
Let's say you end up in the emergency department with chest pains. If you're conscious you can tell the doctor what medications you take - if you remember them all. If you're unconscious, hospital personnel might look on your person for a list of medications. A person in their 40s or 50s with chest pains - there could be a lot of different causes for that, said Dr. Stephen Kotch, chairman of the Department of Emergency Medicine for Washington County Hospital. Patients who can provide a list of their medications or a detailed medical history can help the medical staff narrow down the likely diagnosis and target tests and diagnostics that should be run immediately, Kotch said.
NEWS
by | November 3, 2003
The American Academy of Pediatrics and the National Association of School Nurses gives the following recommendations regarding medicating children at school: Contact your school nurse or principal to learn the rules your school follows for handling and distributing medicine. Ask to see a copy of your school's policy. Find out who is responsible for administering medication in your school, and what medical training they have. Deliver the medication in the original container to the school nurse or office.
NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | February 23, 2004
katec@herald-mail.com Pediatrician and internist Dr. Vincent A. Cantone practices medicine at the Smithsburg Family Medical Center. He takes care of patients of all ages - "from birth to grave," he says. He enjoys his work, and that helps him communicate with his patients. Cantone, who's been in the practice since 1996, says he had some communication training in medical school. He interviewed patients in front of attending physicians and was graded on how he did. When he gets a new patient, he looks at the information provided in the medical history.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | April 15, 2003
charlestown@herald-mail.com MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - U.S. Rep. Shelley Moore Capito got her share of advice and questions Monday when local residents packed the lobby of a local medical center to vent their frustrations about several issues, including the cost of prescription medicine and their inability to get medical insurance. Much of the concern at the meeting at the Shenandoah Valley Medical Center focused on how senior citizens are dealing with high medical care costs, but John Restaino said many "working poor" face the same problems.
NEWS
By MARIE GILBERT | May 16, 2009
HAGERSTOWN -- A boy's voice came on the line and, instinctively, the 911 operator knew it wasn't a prank call. His mother was suffering a reaction to her diabetes, he explained. She needed help. For several years, Eric Lilly, 10, had been told what to do if his mother's blood sugar got too low. He already had given her peanut butter and Pepsi. But she was having trouble talking, so he knew he needed to call 911. That phone call could have saved his mother's life, dispatcher Jamie Glaze said.
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NEWS
By MARIE GILBERT | May 16, 2009
HAGERSTOWN -- A boy's voice came on the line and, instinctively, the 911 operator knew it wasn't a prank call. His mother was suffering a reaction to her diabetes, he explained. She needed help. For several years, Eric Lilly, 10, had been told what to do if his mother's blood sugar got too low. He already had given her peanut butter and Pepsi. But she was having trouble talking, so he knew he needed to call 911. That phone call could have saved his mother's life, dispatcher Jamie Glaze said.
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NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | October 29, 2007
Let's say you end up in the emergency department with chest pains. If you're conscious you can tell the doctor what medications you take - if you remember them all. If you're unconscious, hospital personnel might look on your person for a list of medications. A person in their 40s or 50s with chest pains - there could be a lot of different causes for that, said Dr. Stephen Kotch, chairman of the Department of Emergency Medicine for Washington County Hospital. Patients who can provide a list of their medications or a detailed medical history can help the medical staff narrow down the likely diagnosis and target tests and diagnostics that should be run immediately, Kotch said.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | May 26, 2007
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Berkeley County Sheriff W. Randy Smith said Friday he is waiting for the results of an autopsy on a 2-year-old Martinsburg-area boy whose death Thursday morning is being considered suspicious. "Everything's at a standstill at this point," Smith said. Emergency officials initially received a report on Thursday about 11 a.m. that the child was in cardiac arrest and EMS crews could not revive the child. The boy's mother and grandmother did not wish to have the name of the boy released on Thursday.
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSLEY | July 20, 2005
martinsburg@herald-mail.com MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Police called to a secluded, wooded area where a body was found Tuesday night on the mountain behind Poor House Road believe the death likely was accidental, officials said. The unidentified man's body was found at 7:46 p.m. about a mile away from a house at 4681 Poor House Road, outside of Martinsburg. Police had to use a four-wheeler to get to the spot, Berkeley County Sheriff's Department Chief Deputy Kenneth Lemaster said.
NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | February 23, 2004
katec@herald-mail.com Pediatrician and internist Dr. Vincent A. Cantone practices medicine at the Smithsburg Family Medical Center. He takes care of patients of all ages - "from birth to grave," he says. He enjoys his work, and that helps him communicate with his patients. Cantone, who's been in the practice since 1996, says he had some communication training in medical school. He interviewed patients in front of attending physicians and was graded on how he did. When he gets a new patient, he looks at the information provided in the medical history.
NEWS
by | November 3, 2003
The American Academy of Pediatrics and the National Association of School Nurses gives the following recommendations regarding medicating children at school: Contact your school nurse or principal to learn the rules your school follows for handling and distributing medicine. Ask to see a copy of your school's policy. Find out who is responsible for administering medication in your school, and what medical training they have. Deliver the medication in the original container to the school nurse or office.
NEWS
July 14, 2003
The IDEA Health & Fitness Association suggests asking these questions when interviewing potential personal trainers: What is your exercise and educational background? Are you certified by a nationally recognized organization? What is your level of training experience? How do you keep current on the latest training techniques, research and trends? Are you certified in CPR and first aid? Do you require a health screening or release from my doctor?
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | April 15, 2003
charlestown@herald-mail.com MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - U.S. Rep. Shelley Moore Capito got her share of advice and questions Monday when local residents packed the lobby of a local medical center to vent their frustrations about several issues, including the cost of prescription medicine and their inability to get medical insurance. Much of the concern at the meeting at the Shenandoah Valley Medical Center focused on how senior citizens are dealing with high medical care costs, but John Restaino said many "working poor" face the same problems.
NEWS
by Christine L. Moats | March 31, 2003
Q: What is muscular dystrophy? A: According to the Muscular Dystrophy Association, the term muscular dystrophy refers to a group of genetic diseases marked by progressive weakness and degeneration of the skeletal or voluntary muscles which control movement. The muscles of the heart and some other involuntary muscles are also affected in some forms of muscular dystrophy, and a few forms involve other organs as well. Muscular dystrophy can affect people of all ages. Although some forms first become apparent in infancy or childhood, others may not appear until middle age or later.
NEWS
BY Christine L. Moats | April 1, 2002
Q: What can I do to prepare for my first doctor's visit without one of my parents? A: To be prepared, do the following: Bring your medical records or have them transferred from your previous doctor's office. Bring your insurance card with you to your visit. Arrive early for your first visit as you will most likely have to fill out paperwork. If you haven't been feeling well, make a list of the symptoms you've been experiencing to share with your doctor. Write down any questions or concerns that you would like to discuss with the doctor.
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