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Medicaid

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 20, 1998
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Medicaid waiver hearings will be held from 3 to 6 p.m. Tuesday at the Comfort Inn-Aikens Center in Martinsburg. For information, call Ken Ervin at ADAPTof West Virginia at 1-304-293-4255, Ext. 26100 or Cindy Knighten at 1-304-926-1710.
NEWS
June 3, 1997
What to expect if you're currently on Medicaid: Everyone on Medicaid must fill out forms or call to enroll in HealthChoice. Forms and a HealthChoice Information packet will be delivered between now and October. The packet provides details comparing the four managed care groups. You will have 21 days to tell the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene with which group you wish to enroll. You may enroll by phone or mail. To keep your current doctors, find out if they are signed on with one of the four groups by calling their office and asking.
NEWS
By KERRY LYNN FRALEY | September 1, 1998
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Until his mother-in-law died in April, Martinsburg resident E.J. Saville didn't have to worry about who would care for his brother-in-law, Johnny Morgan, who requires round-the-clock help because of muscular dystrophy When she got sick and could no longer care for him alone, she paid $630 a month for private insurance to cover someone to come in to help, Saville said. After a lifetime at home with his mother, Morgan, 40, didn't want to move into a nursing home after she died and the insurance coverage limit was exceeded, said Saville, who took over his brother-in-law's care full time.
NEWS
September 16, 1997
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - The Berkeley County Alzheimer's Support Group is hosting a program called "Medicaid and the Estate Recovery Program in West Virginia: Questions and Answers" at 7:30 p.m. today in the TCU Activity Room, fourth floor at City Hospital, Martinsburg. The speaker will be Donna Cobean, a social worker at City Hospital.
NEWS
by Stephen A. Moses | June 10, 2006
A series of letters to the editor by a pair of lawyers and U.S. Rep Roscoe Bartlett, R-6th, (March 25, April 4, and April 16) illustrate that our country has a severely dysfunctional, welfare-financed, nursing-home-based long-term care system that serves no one well, least of all the poor. How in the world did we get into such a mess in the wealthiest country in the world? If the question is "Who should pay for long-term care?," the average person will answer, "Anybody but me. " Next best, they'll say, "Everyone should pay. " Last, they'll say, "me. " In 1965, Medicaid came along and started paying for nursing-home care.
NEWS
April 4, 2006
Medicaid and charitable giving To the editor: Exaggerated and false claims about being penalized for charitable contributions when applying for Medicaid have many senior citizens calling me to ask - what is the truth? Inaccurate reports are causing unnecessary worry and a misunderstanding of changes to the Medicaid program made as part of the Deficit Reduction Act that will save taxpayers $39 billion over the next five years. It has been declared that seniors will be penalized for giving money to their children, grandchildren, charities and churches.
NEWS
May 28, 1997
By DAVE McMILLION Staff Writer, Martinsburg MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - U.S. Sen. Jay Rockefeller will visit a local health clinic Friday to talk about the need to increase health insurance for children. There are about 10 million children in the country and about 50,000 in West Virginia without health insurance, according to Rockefeller. "Uninsured children don't get the health care they need. They don't have regular doctor visits. They don't get their immunizations," Rockefeller said.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | September 27, 2008
A nutritionist convicted of fraudulent Medicaid billing was sentenced to five years of probation and ordered to pay back about $178,000. Olusola Idowu of Sani Lane in Hagerstown, whose business was called SSS Nutrition Services, also was sentenced to six years in prison, but the time was suspended, court records show. Washington County Circuit Judge Donald E. Beachley sentenced Idowu on Sept. 16, but the Maryland attorney general's office, which prosecuted the case, didn't announce the outcome until Friday.
OPINION
By MIGUEL McINNIS | August 8, 2011
As seen in the fiscal year 2011 federal budget fight, the current fiscal year 2012 budget discussions are shaping up to be equally, if not more, contentious. While the federal government and state legislators grapple with proposed budget cuts and looming budget deficits, programs that provide services to the most vulnerable in our society might be at risk. According to the National Conference on State Legislatures (NSCL), state deficits for 2012-13 are expected to total $150 billion.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 31, 2013
A grand jury has indicted a Washington County man on charges of attempting to defraud the Maryland Medicaid program, the state Attorney General's Office said Wednesday. The Charles County grand jury indicted Scott Colver, 48, of Spring Creek Road near Hagerstown on six counts of felony Medicaid fraud, five counts of felony theft and one count of a felony theft scheme, according to a news release from the attorney general's office. The indictment alleges that from 2004 to 2005, Colver made false representations and attempted to defraud the Maryland Medicaid program in connection with nursing home expenses, the release said.
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NEWS
July 16, 2012
Meritus Healthcare Foundation's board of directors granted more than $2 million to Meritus Medical Center during a quarterly business meeting July 12. The funds will be used to enhance and continue programs for patients in Washington County and the surrounding region, officials said. “This is what we work so hard for all year long,” said Bob Rankin, chairman of the Meritus Healthcare Foundation. “Our patients need our help; the community needs us.” Donations to Meritus Healthcare Foundation fund programs at the hospital, “some that might not exist at all without donors,” Rankin said.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | February 22, 2012
A Medicaid reimbursement issue affecting the John R. Marsh Cancer Center in Washington County apparently has been resolved. This was the second straight year Del. John P. Donoghue, D-Washington, presented a bill trying to fix what was seen as technical language that hurt the center. Donoghue's bill would make a “provider-based outpatient oncology center” eligible for reimbursement at a percentage of the applicable Medicare rate. To qualify, a center has to be associated with a hospital, but off the site.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | January 13, 2012
Editor's note: This is one in an occasional series of profiles about candidates running for election in the 6th Congressional District. As a single parent, Charles Bailey said he's concerned about the educational future for his 6-year-old son. As a combat medic with the Army National Guard's 29th Light Infantry Division, Bailey believes it's time for American troops to come home from Afghanistan. "The sacrifice of young lives, and two billion dollars a month, is too much to give in building an economy on the other side of the world when we need to rebuild the economy here in the Sixth District," Bailey, a Democrat, wrote in an email about why he is running for Congress.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | November 22, 2011
Looming changes to Medicare and Medicaid could have dramatic effects on health care in Franklin County, Pa., hospital officials said Tuesday. Summit Health President and Chief Executive Officer Norman B. Epstein hosted the health system's annual meetings at Chambersburg, Pa., and Waynesboro hospitals. He used much of his presentation to address Medicare, Medicaid and the national deficit. “This is a real problem, and it's not going to get better,” Epstein said. Waynesboro Hospital is designated as a Medicare-dependent rural hospital, according to Patrick O'Donnell, Summit Health's senior vice president, chief financial officer and chief operating officer.
OPINION
By MIGUEL McINNIS | August 8, 2011
As seen in the fiscal year 2011 federal budget fight, the current fiscal year 2012 budget discussions are shaping up to be equally, if not more, contentious. While the federal government and state legislators grapple with proposed budget cuts and looming budget deficits, programs that provide services to the most vulnerable in our society might be at risk. According to the National Conference on State Legislatures (NSCL), state deficits for 2012-13 are expected to total $150 billion.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | May 19, 2011
Washington County Democrats gathered Thursday night to dine, mingle and get a shot of political adrenaline. Speaking at the Washington County Democratic Central Committee’s Jefferson-Jackson Dinner, U.S. Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin, D-Md., promised that Democrats in Washington will protect Medicare and Medicaid and preserve the collective-bargaining rights of labor unions. Cardin took aim at federal GOP budget plans to privatize Medicare and turn Medicaid into a block grant, as well as cut funding for the National Institutes of Health, Head Start for children’s development, Pell Grants for education aid and women’s health care.
NEWS
April 23, 2011
U.S. Rep. Bill Shuster, R-Pa., made several stops in Franklin County, Pa., this week, including visits to Waynesboro Hospital and the Tuscarora Area Chamber of Commerce dinner. He toured the Volvo plant in Shippensburg, Pa., on Thursday afternoon. Shuster, who has been in the House for 10 years, sat down with Herald-Mail reporter Jennifer Fitch to talk about national issues. Here are excerpts of the conversation: Q: Do you have any idea what is going on with Medicare and Medicaid in the future?
OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | April 10, 2011
For those who haven’t noticed, there are two nanny states in this nation, one Democrat and one Republican. The Democrats want to nanny the rich, while the Republicans want to nanny the poor. And indeed, it’s the Party of Limited Government that is now sticking its nose into the refrigerators of the poor. A proposal by Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer, a Republican, would tax poor, fat people $50 if they fail to adhere to a medically approved weight-loss plan, along with taxing tobacco use. “This noodle-headed idea,” wrote Dr. Art Caplan, “comes from the same governor and legislature that last year decided the way to balance the budget was to rescind coverage for Arizonans waiting for organ transplants.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | March 22, 2011
The John R. Marsh Cancer Center in Washington County is in a unique position. It’s part of Meritus Health, but isn’t at the hospital, and therefore doesn’t qualify for Medicaid reimbursement. Del. John P. Donoghue, D-Washington, presented a bill on Tuesday to change that, making a “provider-based outpatient oncology center” eligible for reimbursement at a percentage of the applicable Medicare rate. According to Raymond A. Grahe, Meritus Health’s vice president for financial services, who spoke during the hearing, the center had $2.6 million in charges during the last six years that were considered “charity care” because the system wasn’t reimbursed.
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