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NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com | September 25, 2012
Molly Murray's first-grade class at Greencastle-Antrim Primary School is learning about magnets and magnification thanks to a website, the kindness of a New Jersey resident and United Parcel Service. When Murray wanted to provide hands-on science materials for her class, she turned to an online charity - DonorsChoose.org. “We had a weekly science center going on, but I didn't feel I had enough materials to maintain it,” Murray said. Jeff Koons with Horace Mann, an insurance agency serving the educational community, told Murray about the online website that links classrooms in need with donors.
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NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | February 14, 2006
charlestown@herald-mail.com MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - What will public school students need to learn in the 21st century to be successful: New ways of learning math and science? More emphasis on critical thinking? Those types of issues are being debated as the West Virginia Department of Education goes on the road to get input on how public education should be offered in coming years. The state Department of Education is hosting eight forums, called, "Voices from the Field: A Forum for WV Educators," across the state to get input from educators, according to department spokeswoman Liza Cordeiro.
NEWS
by KAREN HANNA | April 24, 2006
Since Washington County Public Schools readvertised teachers' positions at Eastern Elementary School three years ago, state test scores have increased dramatically. Salaries also have risen - with the restructuring, every teacher and administrator earns $5,000 more a year - but staff members at the school said Thursday the changes are not only reflected in the numbers. "I just think that everybody here, something that's very important, they all have the highest expectations of kids," said Julie Stouffer, a student achievement specialist.
NEWS
November 18, 1998
As Washington County school board members wonder aloud how they'll pay for the projects outlined in a new strategic plan, we suggest that they look at what a Maryland business group is doing around the state to make education reform a reality. The group is the the Maryland Business Rountable for Education, a group of more than 100 businesses that's been working for six years to improve instruction and the quality of students entering the work force. In an interview with The Associated Press, the group's chairman, Raymond A. "Chip" Mason of Legg Mason, Inc., said that 30 years ago it was possible for students to drop out of school and make a decent living in the manufacturing area, even if they didn't have good reading or math skills.
NEWS
May 27, 1997
After a testy session this past Tuesday which featured a series of outbursts and accusations, the Washington County Commissioners backed down from a proposal to hike the piggyback income tax from 50 to 54 percent. That's good news for taxpayers who will still face a 10-cent property-tax hike, but the commissioners' decision not to hike income taxes or enact a real-estate transfer tax will mean cuts in school programs that are vital to improving education locally. The Outdoor School may be a sentimental favorite, but the real damage will come from cutting an elementary school improvement grant program that would have provided extra help to students who need work on reading and math skills.
NEWS
By KAREN HANNA | January 15, 2006
karenh@herald-mail.com For one Bester Elementary School fifth-grader, the most important test of the week might have come at recess. That's when he walked from a fight, teacher Tiffany Tresler said. "It is the kids in this class who encouraged him," Tresler said after school Wednesday. "They told him, 'Walk away, walk away,'" Students have embraced the notion that their learning environment is a sanctuary, where they are responsible for both their actions and the way their responses to others influence the behavior of their classmates, Tresler said.
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | February 14, 2006
marlob@herald-mail.com When Shawnee McMahon needed a little help in math, her teacher suggested she join a club. It turned out to be just what the 13-year-old needed. "I'm doing much better in math now and have been on the honor roll every marking period," Shawnee said. That "club" is the Blazer Club at Clear Spring Middle School which draws about 40 youngsters every Wednesday from 3:30 to 4:45 p.m. The reason for its existence is to help students there with their homework and any subject that might be giving them some trouble.
NEWS
March 21, 2007
Jeremy Johnson Smithsburg Basketball Senior What do you like best about your sport? "The competitiveness....like only five people on the court per team, at a time. " Toughest individual opponent you have faced? Dee Mency Pregame rituals? "Listen to music. " Besides your parents, the most influential person in your life? "My coach. " Person you'd most like to meet (alive or dead)? Vince Carter Favorite professional team? Jacksonville Jaguars Favorite athlete?
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | February 4, 2005
julieg@herald-mail.com WASHINGTON COUNTY - Similar to Eastern Elementary School's teacher restructuring more than a year ago, teachers at Bester Elementary School and math and English teachers at South Hagerstown High School will need to reapply to work at those schools in an effort to improve students' academic performances, Washington County Public Schools officials said Thursday. The changes, which school system administrators are calling "School Improvement Initiatives," would take effect for the next school year, according to a Washington County Public Schools news release.
NEWS
November 28, 2001
Gnage hired as new CEO at Penn State Mont Alto By LAURA ERNDE laurae@herald-mail.com MONT ALTO, Pa. - Penn State Mont Alto has named an administrator from the University of Arizona as its new chief executive officer. David C. Gnage, 56, was interim dean of Arizona International College, which is the University of Arizona's liberal arts college in Tuscon, Ariz. He begins his new job Jan. 14 and will be living in nearby Penn National Estates. "Dr. Gnage has extensive experience in fiscal and administrative affairs, enrollment management and developing academic partnerships," said Diane Disney, dean of Penn State's Commonwealth College.
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