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NEWS
November 18, 1998
As Washington County school board members wonder aloud how they'll pay for the projects outlined in a new strategic plan, we suggest that they look at what a Maryland business group is doing around the state to make education reform a reality. The group is the the Maryland Business Rountable for Education, a group of more than 100 businesses that's been working for six years to improve instruction and the quality of students entering the work force. In an interview with The Associated Press, the group's chairman, Raymond A. "Chip" Mason of Legg Mason, Inc., said that 30 years ago it was possible for students to drop out of school and make a decent living in the manufacturing area, even if they didn't have good reading or math skills.
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NEWS
May 27, 1997
After a testy session this past Tuesday which featured a series of outbursts and accusations, the Washington County Commissioners backed down from a proposal to hike the piggyback income tax from 50 to 54 percent. That's good news for taxpayers who will still face a 10-cent property-tax hike, but the commissioners' decision not to hike income taxes or enact a real-estate transfer tax will mean cuts in school programs that are vital to improving education locally. The Outdoor School may be a sentimental favorite, but the real damage will come from cutting an elementary school improvement grant program that would have provided extra help to students who need work on reading and math skills.
EDUCATION
August 15, 2011
On May 23, at 1st Mariner Arena in Baltimore, Alexandria Volkening of Boonsboro experienced her first graduation ceremony. Volkening, who was homeschooled from first through 12th grades, was honored as the Class of 2011 valedictorian of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Standing in front of more than 5,000 students, faculty members and family, she delivered a commencement address that highlighted the great diversity at UMBC. She challenged her peers to continue to reach out of their comfort zones and combine their voices together to tackle today's increasingly multidisciplinary problems.
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | February 14, 2006
marlob@herald-mail.com When Shawnee McMahon needed a little help in math, her teacher suggested she join a club. It turned out to be just what the 13-year-old needed. "I'm doing much better in math now and have been on the honor roll every marking period," Shawnee said. That "club" is the Blazer Club at Clear Spring Middle School which draws about 40 youngsters every Wednesday from 3:30 to 4:45 p.m. The reason for its existence is to help students there with their homework and any subject that might be giving them some trouble.
NEWS
March 21, 2007
Jeremy Johnson Smithsburg Basketball Senior What do you like best about your sport? "The competitiveness....like only five people on the court per team, at a time. " Toughest individual opponent you have faced? Dee Mency Pregame rituals? "Listen to music. " Besides your parents, the most influential person in your life? "My coach. " Person you'd most like to meet (alive or dead)? Vince Carter Favorite professional team? Jacksonville Jaguars Favorite athlete?
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | February 4, 2005
julieg@herald-mail.com WASHINGTON COUNTY - Similar to Eastern Elementary School's teacher restructuring more than a year ago, teachers at Bester Elementary School and math and English teachers at South Hagerstown High School will need to reapply to work at those schools in an effort to improve students' academic performances, Washington County Public Schools officials said Thursday. The changes, which school system administrators are calling "School Improvement Initiatives," would take effect for the next school year, according to a Washington County Public Schools news release.
NEWS
May 7, 2001
Hanks makes learning fun Editor's Note : The Herald-Mail has been featuring one middle-school teacher a month since October. This is the last of the eight-part series highlighting excellent educators in Washington County. By TARA REILLY tarar@herald-mail.com Photo: KEVIN G. GILBERT / staff photographer David Hanks juggles two classroom strategies daily. While his overall lesson plans are structured, the activities within them vary several times a period.
NEWS
by CAILIN MCGOUGH | July 8, 2002
cailinm@herald-mail.com As a child, Ethel Irvine spent her days swimming, playing tennis and practicing the piano and mandolin. Nights were spent with 10 or 12 other girls sharing a dormitory room at the Lynchburg Female Orphan Asylum. Now 92 and a Hagerstown resident, Irvine said her upbringing at the Lynchburg, Va., orphanage in the 1920s was strict but happy. "We had to live by bells and whistles but we didn't mind that," she said. Born in Lynchburg, Irvine was 4 years old when her father died, leaving her mother to send her to live with relatives while she worked in a local shoe factory.
NEWS
November 28, 2001
Gnage hired as new CEO at Penn State Mont Alto By LAURA ERNDE laurae@herald-mail.com MONT ALTO, Pa. - Penn State Mont Alto has named an administrator from the University of Arizona as its new chief executive officer. David C. Gnage, 56, was interim dean of Arizona International College, which is the University of Arizona's liberal arts college in Tuscon, Ariz. He begins his new job Jan. 14 and will be living in nearby Penn National Estates. "Dr. Gnage has extensive experience in fiscal and administrative affairs, enrollment management and developing academic partnerships," said Diane Disney, dean of Penn State's Commonwealth College.
NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | January 26, 2004
scottb@herald-mail.com Now that Sarah Keely, 16, has graduated from Hagerstown Community College as its youngest student ever, she is preparing for her next challenge: Getting a driver's license. The license, which Keely said Sunday she hopes to get by April, should alleviate one of the ways she differs from other students in the college: She has to get rides to school. Keely, who was home-schooled most of her life, was 15 when she graduated in December with a 4.0 grade-point average.
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