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NEWS
January 13, 1999
Maryland officials facing a future shortfall of revenues for road and bridge projects believe that 1999 is the now-or-never year to find new sources of cash. But as they discuss their options, we hope they find a place in the state's plans for mass transit. Long before the 1999 session opened, Maryland Chamber President Champe McCulloch predicted that lawmakers would act to beef up the state's Transportation Trust Fund, in a way that would prevent mass-transit from eating up too much of the money.
NEWS
December 15, 1998
Before the first meeting of a group of business and government leaders appointed to study whether there's a need to raise Maryland's gasoline tax, newly-elected state representatives Chris Shank and Alex Mooney have declared their opposition to a hike. We too have reservations about any boost that funds an endless number of new road projects based on the assumption that gasoline will never be more than $1 a gallon again. Our fear, in fact, is that when gasoline does go up again, voters will demand more mass transit options, leaving millions of dollars worth of asphalt and concrete, unused and unrecoverable, in the ground.
NEWS
February 2, 1999
Realizing that they need to prove that there's a need for more transportation funding in the middle of a booming state economy, Maryland leaders, including Gov. Parris Glendening, will delay a proposal to hike the state's gasoline tax for at least a year. It's a move the makes sense, if state officials want to raise the level of debate on this issue. So far we've heard three positions. The first is that there's no need for any additional money, despite a growing list of road and transportation projects.
NEWS
August 14, 2007
Proposed tax revisions need a closer look To the editor: Gov. Martin O'Malley has spent his first Maryland General Assembly session deflecting calls for specific tax increases. Instead, the governor hopes to tackle the state's structural deficit - estimated to be $1.5 billion next year - with a comprehensive overhaul of the tax code in 2008. As that process begins, we should listen closely. When the governor links his optimism about the state's future with the need for continued public investment, the careful listener will hear an unspoken call for higher taxes.
NEWS
September 14, 2000
Group gives local lawmakers poor ratings on environment By LAURA ERNDE / Staff Writer Washington County lawmakers got below-average marks for their votes on environmental issues, according to recent ratings by the Maryland League of Conservation Voters. continued One local legislator, Sen. Alex X. Mooney, voted against every position taken by the Maryland League of Conservation Voters, earning him a zero rating. "You have to work pretty hard to get a zero," said Susan Brown, the league's executive director.
NEWS
by LAURA ERNDE | March 14, 2003
laurae@herald-mail.com Improvements to Interstate 81 in Washington County made the state's wish list of major transportation projects over the next six years. Gov. Robert Ehrlich announced Thursday that he's asking the federal government for $10.6 million for the widening project. The money would cover design and engineering costs. The statewide wish list includes $1.4 billion in highway projects and $662 million in mass transit initiatives. "We want to be aggressive, have an aggressive transportation agenda," Ehrlich said.
OPINION
April 11, 2013
The price of gas in Maryland, following a tax hike in the General Assembly, is on target to increase by 4 cents in July, with a series of percentage hikes to follow, lasting through the year 2016 - not to mention a permanent tie to inflation. All told, gas likely will cost 20 more cents a gallon by the time the hikes are phased in over the next three years. It goes without saying that rural Marylanders who do the most driving will pay a higher percentage of the new tax, at least on a per-capita basis.
NEWS
by DAVID BUSSARD | August 8, 2005
I remember the first time I went to New York City. I went to visit New York University with my uncles and my mother, basically with the intent of showing her that New York, despite being a busy place, was a safe place for her youngest to be living for the next four years. And the most memorable moment of the entire trip was the one approached with the most trepidation - our journey from the George Washington Bridge to West 4th Street on the subway. She was absolutely terrified.
NEWS
By KAUSTUV BASU | kaustuv.basu@herald-mail.com | February 3, 2013
For several years, Gov. Martin O'Malley has been talking about raising transportation funds for Maryland with a possible sales tax increase on gasoline. Last year, he floated an idea of a 6 percent sales tax increase on gas, but did not find a lot of backers. In his State of the State address Wednesday, O'Malley made another reference to the state's transportation needs. “There is no reason why we should be content with having the worst traffic congestion in the country. Building a 21st-century transportation network won't happen by itself,” O'Malley said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 11, 2013
The price of gas in Maryland, following a tax hike in the General Assembly, is on target to increase by 4 cents in July, with a series of percentage hikes to follow, lasting through the year 2016 - not to mention a permanent tie to inflation. All told, gas likely will cost 20 more cents a gallon by the time the hikes are phased in over the next three years. It goes without saying that rural Marylanders who do the most driving will pay a higher percentage of the new tax, at least on a per-capita basis.
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OPINION
March 27, 2013
Raising taxes, particularly on gas, not the answer to woes To the editor: Gov. O'Malley and the Democrats in Annapolis have the same answer to all of our problems: tax increases. The governor claims that this gas tax increase is needed to build roads and bridges. However, he fails to mention that since becoming governor, he has raided more than $1 billion in funds from the Transportation Trust Fund, which have not been repaid.  The governor and his Democratic allies push for their new taxes, never mind the facts.
NEWS
By KAUSTUV BASU | kaustuv.basu@herald-mail.com | February 3, 2013
For several years, Gov. Martin O'Malley has been talking about raising transportation funds for Maryland with a possible sales tax increase on gasoline. Last year, he floated an idea of a 6 percent sales tax increase on gas, but did not find a lot of backers. In his State of the State address Wednesday, O'Malley made another reference to the state's transportation needs. “There is no reason why we should be content with having the worst traffic congestion in the country. Building a 21st-century transportation network won't happen by itself,” O'Malley said.
NEWS
by DAVID BUSSARD | August 8, 2005
I remember the first time I went to New York City. I went to visit New York University with my uncles and my mother, basically with the intent of showing her that New York, despite being a busy place, was a safe place for her youngest to be living for the next four years. And the most memorable moment of the entire trip was the one approached with the most trepidation - our journey from the George Washington Bridge to West 4th Street on the subway. She was absolutely terrified.
NEWS
June 12, 2005
Editor's note: Each week, The Herald-Mail invites readers to answer poll questions on its Web site, www.herald-mail.com . Readers also may submit comments about the poll question when voting. Each Sunday, a sampling of reader comments will appear in The Herald-Mail. Last week's poll question was: How high will the price of gas have to be before you change your current driving habits? "This will be short and to the point. My grandkids can no longer enjoy a real vacation.
NEWS
by LAURA ERNDE | March 14, 2003
laurae@herald-mail.com Improvements to Interstate 81 in Washington County made the state's wish list of major transportation projects over the next six years. Gov. Robert Ehrlich announced Thursday that he's asking the federal government for $10.6 million for the widening project. The money would cover design and engineering costs. The statewide wish list includes $1.4 billion in highway projects and $662 million in mass transit initiatives. "We want to be aggressive, have an aggressive transportation agenda," Ehrlich said.
NEWS
by LAURA ERNDE | December 13, 2002
laurae@herald-mail.com HAGERSTOWN - Lt. Gov.-elect Michael Steele told a trucking industry group Thursday that the new administration will try to avoid raising the gas tax. Steele also assured the largely Western Maryland audience that their needs in transportation and other areas will not be forgotten. "I know a lot of people here feel like they're cut off. I'm here to tell you, you do matter," Steele told the audience of about 100 people at the Four Points Sheraton in Hagerstown.
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