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NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | heather.keels@herald-mail.com | June 7, 2011
A long-debated zoning overlay that will allow expansion of a Williamsport-area quarry got the green light Tuesday from the Washington County Board of Commissioners. Four of the five commissioners said they were in favor of approving an "industrial mineral" zoning overlay that will allow Martin Marietta Materials to mine an additional 77 acres west of the current Pinesburg Quarry. The previous board of county commissioners voted in 2009 to deny the zoning overlay, but a Washington County Circuit Court judge found the board's reasoning was inadequate and ordered the county to reconsider.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | June 16, 2009
The Washington County Commissioners did not reach a consensus Tuesday on whether to approve or deny a rezoning request that would allow Martin Marietta Materials to mine an additional 77 acres west of the current Pinesburg Quarry northwest of Williamsport. Commissioner William J. Wivell asked county attorneys to develop a new draft of proposed conditions for the rezoning for the commissioners to consider at a future meeting. Already, Martin Marietta has agreed to a list of eight conditions that includes restrictions on blasting, provisions for well protection, regular meetings with nearby residents and a buffer around the new quarry area, Assistant County Attorney Kirk C. Downey said.
NEWS
February 3, 2001
Firm seeks quarry expansion By SCOTT BUTKI / Staff Writer Martin Marietta Materials Inc. is seeking Washington County's permission to expand by 13.5 acres the area it can mine at the Boonsboro limestone quarry. The Washington County Planning Commission is scheduled to consider the company's request to change its site plan during a meeting at 7 p.m. Monday at the County Commissioners meeting room in the County Administration Building. No public hearing is scheduled.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | November 27, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - Bottom Road resident Billy Payne on Monday told Washington County officials that it feels like his house is crashing down when workers blast at the Pinesburg Quarry. And it could get worse, he said during a public hearing before the Washington County Commissioners and Washington County Planning Commission, if Martin Marietta Materials Inc. is given permission to expand its interests to mine 77 acres of land that borders the quarry to the north. Paxton Badham of Martin Marietta told county officials and about 60 people in attendance that rezoning the land north of the quarry would not increase mining intensity in that area.
NEWS
By JOSHUA BOWMAN | November 23, 2007
WILLIAMSPORT - The owners of Pinesburg Quarry in Williamsport want to expand the 180-acre open-pit mine. Martin Marietta Materials Inc. has asked Washington County to rezone about 77 acres near the intersection of Md. 68 and Bottom Road so the company can extract rock from the limestone-rich farm soil west of the existing quarry. The company argues that expanding the quarry is necessary and would be less harmful to the environment than digging a new rock pit. But some nearby residents said the expansion could increase damage to their houses, which they said have already suffered cracked foundations from rock blasting at the quarry.
NEWS
By DAN KULIN /Staff Writer | September 17, 1999
Public hearing A proposal to amend the Washington County Zoning Ordinance to require mining companies to put fences around their quarries, and rezoning requests for 186 acres around the Boonsboro quarry, 113 acres near the Interstate 70 and the Sharpsburg Pike interchange and 1.74 acres near the intersection of Oak Ridge Drive and Maryland Route 65. Monday, Sept. 20 7 p.m. Court Room No. 1, Washington County Courthouse in Hagerstown. Hearings on a request to rezone about 186 acres near Boonsboro for mining activities and a proposal to require mining companies to surround their quarries with fences highlight a joint public session of the Washington County Commissioners and the County Planning Commission Monday.
NEWS
September 20, 1999
By KIMBERLY YAKOWSKI / Staff Writer photo: JOE CROCETTA / staff photographer A rezoning request by a Boonsboro limestone quarry company was met by heated opposition from residents of the area during a joint meeting of the Washington County Commissioners and Planning Commission Monday. [cont. from front page ] Operations at the Martin Marietta Materials Inc. Booonsboro quarry on 20301 Benevola Church Road has caused cracked foundations, polluted water, heavy truck traffic, blasting noises 24 hours a day and vibrations strong enough to knock people to the ground, according to testimony from about 15 people during the hearing.
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NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | heather.keels@herald-mail.com | June 7, 2011
A long-debated zoning overlay that will allow expansion of a Williamsport-area quarry got the green light Tuesday from the Washington County Board of Commissioners. Four of the five commissioners said they were in favor of approving an "industrial mineral" zoning overlay that will allow Martin Marietta Materials to mine an additional 77 acres west of the current Pinesburg Quarry. The previous board of county commissioners voted in 2009 to deny the zoning overlay, but a Washington County Circuit Court judge found the board's reasoning was inadequate and ordered the county to reconsider.
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NEWS
June 6, 2011
Scheduled meetings this week of the Washington County Commissioners, Washington County Board of Education, and Hagerstown Mayor and Council: WASHINGTON COUNTY COMMISSIONERS 820 Commonwealth Ave., Hagerstown Tuesday, June 7, 8:30 a.m. Agenda • 8:30 a.m.: Joint meeting with the Board of Education at 820 Commonwealth Ave., Hagerstown     (1) Third quarter adjustments to Board of Education’s FY 2011 general fund budget     (2)
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | July 28, 2009
WASHINGTON COUNTY -- The Washington County Commissioners voted Tuesday to deny a long-debated rezoning request that would have allowed Martin Marietta Materials to mine an additional 77 acres west of the current Pinesburg Quarry near Williamsport. Commissioner Kristin B. Aleshire, who made the motion to deny the request, said the decision was due to "unresolved issues. " Aleshire and other commissioners said they were not satisfied with the list of conditions that were proposed as terms of the approval.
NEWS
By JOSHUA BOWMAN | April 30, 2008
WILLIAMSPORT -- A proposed expansion of the Pinesburg Quarry in Williamsport was not approved Tuesday by the Washington County Commissioners, some of whom said the quarry must do more for nearby residents before they approve the expansion. Several county commissioners questioned how the expansion would affect wells and water quality in the area and asked what can be done for residents whose property is damaged by blasting. They also said they were concerned about what would happen to a historic house and barn on the site of the proposed expansion.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | November 27, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - Bottom Road resident Billy Payne on Monday told Washington County officials that it feels like his house is crashing down when workers blast at the Pinesburg Quarry. And it could get worse, he said during a public hearing before the Washington County Commissioners and Washington County Planning Commission, if Martin Marietta Materials Inc. is given permission to expand its interests to mine 77 acres of land that borders the quarry to the north. Paxton Badham of Martin Marietta told county officials and about 60 people in attendance that rezoning the land north of the quarry would not increase mining intensity in that area.
NEWS
By JOSHUA BOWMAN | November 23, 2007
WILLIAMSPORT - The owners of Pinesburg Quarry in Williamsport want to expand the 180-acre open-pit mine. Martin Marietta Materials Inc. has asked Washington County to rezone about 77 acres near the intersection of Md. 68 and Bottom Road so the company can extract rock from the limestone-rich farm soil west of the existing quarry. The company argues that expanding the quarry is necessary and would be less harmful to the environment than digging a new rock pit. But some nearby residents said the expansion could increase damage to their houses, which they said have already suffered cracked foundations from rock blasting at the quarry.
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