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Lyme Disease

NEWS
By BILL ANDERSON | June 22, 2008
As we enter into the peak of the vacation season and outdoors activities are at the highest level of the summer, Lyme disease once again becomes an issue. Reported cases of Lyme have been on a steady rise for many years now and Maryland is one of the states with a high level of growth. By the way, Lyme disease is name for the town of Lyme, Conn., where the disease was first identified. Lyme disease is a bacterial disease, caused by the bite of an infected blacklegged or deer tick.
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NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | May 25, 2008
Editor's note: Each Sunday, The Herald-Mail publishes "A Life Remembered. " This continuing series takes a look back - through the eyes of family, friends, co-workers and others - at a member of the community who died recently. Today's "A Life Remembered" is about Sharon Rucker, who died May 9 at the age of 58. Her obituary was published in the May 17 edition of The Herald-Mail. In what she titled "A Living Portfolio," Sharon Rucker said she saw herself as an explorer, and she kept the notebook to chronicle the journey into her faith.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | May 24, 2008
Editor's note: Each Sunday, The Herald-Mail publishes "A Life Remembered. " This continuing series takes a look back -- through the eyes of family, friends, co-workers and others -- at a member of the community who died recently. Today's "A Life Remembered" is about Sharon Rucker, who died May 9 at the age of 58. Her obituary was published in the May 17 edition of The Herald-Mail. In what she titled "A Living Portfolio," Sharon Rucker said she saw herself as an explorer, and she kept the notebook to chronicle the journey into her faith.
NEWS
By Bill Anderson | May 11, 2008
Now that the weather is starting to become nice, a lot of people are spending time outdoors enjoying activities such as hiking, biking and fishing. If you spend much time in the field, you have a very good chance of coming in contact with ticks - both wood ticks and deer ticks. This raises concerns about Lyme disease, which is very common in this area and is showing up in people and pets. Each spring, I receive a ton of press releases warning about the potential of Lyme disease.
NEWS
By DON AINES | January 1, 2008
CHAMBERSBURG, PA. - Interrupted birthdays, angry Christmas Day calls and firing people are a few of the things Franklin County Commissioners G. Warren Elliott and Cheryl Plummer will not miss when they leave office next week. This past year, however, Elliott's vacations proved at least as challenging as his job. On a trip to Canada, he contracted Lyme disease, along with viral meningitis, which left him delirious and with a temperature of 106 degrees at an isolated fishing camp.
NEWS
December 4, 2006
Miss Grove made all of our lives a little richer To the editor: On Nov. 15, the Herald-Mail carried the obituary of Frances L. Grove. Miss Grove was born at Mount Airy, the Grove family homestead. This farm, west of Sharpsburg, was in the Grove family for almost 100 years. It was a hospital for both Union and Confederates wounded after the Battle of Antietam. The farm and Grove family were visited by none other than President Abraham Lincoln. The pictures of Lincoln at Antietam were taken at the Grove farm and possibly Mr. Lincoln conceived the Gettysburg Address while visiting the wounded.
NEWS
by KRISTIN WILSON | June 12, 2006
Frank Boddicker knows first hand that tick bites need to be taken seriously. The southern Washington County resident contracted Lyme disease more than 25 years ago through a tick bite when he was in his 20s. When he was bitten by the tick, he remembers seeing the characteristic bull's-eye rash mark on his back, but he didn't think anything of it. Eight years later, when Boddicker was diagnosed with Lyme disease, the condition had progressed too...
NEWS
June 12, 2006
Ticks can spread multiple diseases and infections to humans. The most common on the East Coast are Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain spotted fever. More about Lyme disease: Lyme disease is caused by a bacteria passed to humans through a tick bite. Not all people exhibit every symptom associated with Lyme disease, according to information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The first sign of infection is usually a circular rash that begins at the site of a tick bite three to 30 days after a bite.
NEWS
March 6, 2006
CPR, first-aid class HealthFirst Enterprises will offer the following classes: Adult, child and infant CPR instruction, 6:30 p.m. Thursday, March 16; 6 p.m. Tuesday, March 21; or 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 29. Two-year certification cards and all materials included. $40. Registration is required. Healthcare Provider CPR also is offered. First-aid instruction, 9 a.m. Saturday, April 1. The course covers bleeding, burns, shock, severe allergic reactions, asthma, sprains, broken bones, neck and head injuries, diabetes, seizures, heat exhaustion, heat stroke, hypothermia, stings, bites, poisoning and more.
NEWS
By BONNIE H. BRECHBILL | July 24, 2005
bonnieb@herald-mail.com When Chambersburg resident Morgan Crouch was 11, local doctors diagnosed her unusual rash as a spider bite, and her extreme tiredness as chronic fatigue syndrome. It turned out that Crouch, now 23, had Lyme disease, and because it was not treated properly at the outset, it became chronic. Her mother, Mona Crouch, found an internist in East Hampton, N.Y., on Long Island's east end, who specializes in the treatment of Lyme disease. She took her daughter there once a year, making the eight-hour drive to the office of Dr. Joseph J. Burrascano Jr. and paying to stay in a motel overnight.
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