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Long Life

NEWS
By ROBERT KESSLER | January 24, 2009
As gardeners we are called to grow the best tomato, according to Steve Bogash, regional horticulture educator for the Pennsylvania State University Cooperative Extension. By best, he means fruit that tastes great, has a wonderful texture and grows on plants that produce enough harvestable fruit to make all the effort worthwhile. Since 2001, Penn State Cooperative Extension, Franklin County, has hosted a tomato trial program to better meet the needs of the tomato-growing and -eating public.
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NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com | May 16, 2013
With the number of World War II veterans dying at the rate of more than 600 per day, it was a rare occasion to have two veterans of the conflict together in Chambersburg on Thursday. World War II veteran and best-selling author of “Hell's Guest,” Col. Glenn Frazier, 89, was the guest speaker at the Rotary Club meeting at The Orchards Restaurant. He shared his experiences of fighting a losing effort to save the Philippine Island of Luzon from the Japanese to the infamous six-day Bataan Death March and three years of torture in Japanese prisoner of war camps.
NEWS
By JANET HEIM | janeth@herald-mail.com | April 14, 2013
With Catherine “Katie” Stevens' 99th birthday behind her, the calendar is closing in on her centennial birthday. March 13 marked the last birthday Stevens's age could be counted in double digits. She said she received many floral arrangements, more than 50 cards and was still scheduling lunch dates to celebrate with friends. Stevens still lives independently, occasionally drives, flies annually to visit her granddaughter in Florida  and plays the organ at her church, Washington Square United Methodist in Hagerstown.
NEWS
September 8, 2004
Week of Sept. 5, 1954 Housewives aren't canning peaches like they did in the good old days, and because they are not, those who grow this fruit have to find some way to process an additional 360,000 to 400,000 bushels. Already about 750,000 bushels of peaches grown locally were processed this year. The instrumental program in local schools has shown quite a growth in the past few years. Enrollment rose from 363 in 1950 to 884 during the past school year, and school officials anticipate an enrollment of 1,000 during the term that begins this week.
NEWS
by JANET HEIM | November 28, 2006
Jewel Bender has much to be thankful for. As her family gathered for their annual Thanksgiving feast, they also celebrated her 100th birthday. This year, her Nov. 23 birthday happened to fall on Thanksgiving. "That doesn't come very often," Bender said. To mark the milestone, Bender's daughter, Barbara Fulton, held an open house Nov. 21 at her home on Red Oak Drive in Halfway. Friends, family and neighbors came and went throughout the late morning and afternoon bearing gifts, flowers and birthday greetings for the centenarian.
NEWS
By RYAN BARRY / Pulse Correspondent | April 22, 2008
Earth Day is the one day where you have a chance to help the environment, right? Actually, you can help the environment any day of the year, by recycling paper, glass, metal and plastic bottles, by planting new trees and shrubs and by conserving your electricity and water. Planting trees helps prevent global climate change, but it also conserves energy by providing a windbreak in the winter and shade in the summer. The Arbor Day Foundation Web site (www.arborday.org) is a good source of information on the benefits of planting trees.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | October 11, 2008
HAGERSTOWN - There were lots of oohs and aahs coming from children and adults over the special guests at the Fridays at the Library program for home-schoolers at the Washington County Free Library. Linda Marsh, of Rocky Pine Acres in Fayetteville, Pa., brought several miniature horses and members of the All State Miniature Horse and Donkey Club for the program. "I got to see big horses when I was in Williamsport, and now the little horses are at the library," Seth Smith said.
NEWS
January 18, 1998
Hard work kept woman going strong By W. TERRY SMITH Staff Writer The oldest resident of Homewood Retirement Community, Viola Swope Bloyer, died Saturday. She was 104. She was one of the oldest residents of Washington County, believed to be second only to Sarah "Kitty" Jennings, 108, of Clear Spring. Like Jennings, Bloyer was a farm wife. "Many folks think the good outdoor air and homegrown foods are a secret (to long life)," said Estelle Smith, Jennings' daughter and Bloyer's neighbor.
NEWS
By KERRY LYNN FRALEY | September 30, 1998
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Living a long life doesn't mean you'll end up sick and in a nursing home, according to Regina Mayolo of the West Virginia University Center on Aging. But that's one of many negative stereotypes of aging that persist despite statistics to the contrary, said Mayolo, coordinator of community service. "Ninety-five percent of us never see a nursing home," she said. The frightening image goes hand in hand with the myth that aging means inactivity - dispelled by the fact that roughly 60 percent of all volunteers are healthy older adults, Mayolo said.
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