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NEWS
BY STACEY DANZUSO | March 18, 2002
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - In a throwback to the days when storefront legal clinics were a downtown staple for communities, Chambersburg now has its own locally operated legal service for low-income residents in the county. "The number of volunteers and the community support reflects a hunger for something like this to exist," said Mahesh Rao, co-director of Franklin County Legal Services. "People wanted storefront legal services. " The agency opened March 1, and in its first week of business opened 10 cases and gave advice to 35 callers, Rao said.
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NEWS
July 23, 1997
By RICHARD F. BELISLE Staff Writer, Waynesboro WAYNESBORO, Pa. - Waynesboro residents will have a chance to see some 18th century craftsmanship next week, as restoration work begins on the borough's oldest existing structure. Local preservationist Terry Pelton will hoist an ancient broadax and hew a stack of oak timber into the logs that will be used to recreate the cabin he dismantled earlier this month. Called Burns Cabin, or Bourns Cabin, depending on the version of local history consulted, the one-story log cabin will stand on the hillside overlooking the old tollgate building that houses the Greater Waynesboro Chamber of Commerce office at the intersection of East Main Street and Roadside Avenue.
NEWS
by BOB MAGINNIS | December 29, 2004
John Williamson didn't attend North Hagerstown High School. He's not even a Hagerstown native. So why is he chairing the campaign to build a $2.3 million stadium at the school? There are many reasons, but the one that hit home with me was Williamson's experience in seeing what his three children learned about life and teamwork by playing soccer for North High. "In talking to my kids, particularly to Brian, he told me he learned that you may not like the person you're on a team with, but you have to work together to succeed," Williamson said.
NEWS
June 18, 1997
Imagine teaching your children about reflected light by allowing them to climb inside a giant kaleidoscope. Or about invisible energy by letting them turn on a giant magnet and watching how it affects various metal objects. They're doing just that in science centers all over the U.S. and they could do it here in Hagerstown as well. The idea is to make learning fun and to spark children's interest in science at the same time, according to Beverly Baccala, the president of Discovery Station at Hagerstown, Inc. If you attended the recent Western Maryland Blues Fest, you might have seen their exhibit of musical instruments made from common kitchen tools.
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | October 16, 2003
marlob@herald-mail.com Five months into her term as president of the Washington County Council of Churches and other houses of worship, the Rev. Jan Dorsey would like nothing better than to deliver the group's message of interfaith understanding to anyone who will listen. To that end, she is hoping the turnout for today's forum at Hagerstown Community College will be as well attended as those sponsored in the past by the organization. The topic of tonight's forum, which starts at 7 p.m. in the Kepler Theater, is "Women and Faith: The Role of Women in our Muslim, Jewish and Christian Traditions.
NEWS
By BRENDAN KIRBY | April 6, 2000
Washington County has made another contribution to public health: Local residents took part in a study examining the link between genetics and smoker-related illnesses. cont. from front page The research drew upon information from a study group that already has produced hundreds of scientific papers. In the latest study, researchers examined 1,290 people to determine whether a gene already linked to smoking illnesses increased the risk of heart disease. About a quarter of those people came from Washington County.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | November 30, 1999
With the table setting in front of Phyllis Stouter moments away from being put to use, the Hagerstown woman bowed her head for grace along with hundreds of others in the room. The "family" with her Thursday at noontime did not share a genetic connection, but rather the Father whom Stouter credits with ending her drug and alcohol abuse eight years ago. When Stouter accepted Jesus Christ, it was at the Hagerstown Union Rescue Mission, where she still frequents for Thanksgiving dinner.
NEWS
by JANET HEIM | November 9, 2005
janeth@herald-mail.com Editor's note: There are a lot of people you see around town that you recognize, but don't know anything about. People like ... Tom Vucina Age: 79 Occupation: Retired in 1988 after 25 years as a machinist with Mack Trucks Hometown: New Brighton, Pa. Where would you see Vucina? A World War II veteran, Vucina is involved in local AMVETS, VFW and American Legion organizations. Because he had repeated the third grade, Vucina was a junior in high school when he turned 18. He laughs at his history - that he was drafted into the armed services in 1944 and graduated from high school in 1947.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | June 4, 2002
julieg@herald-mail.com SHARPSBURG - Sharpsburg's proposed budget includes money for water and sewer subsidies for town residents, but not nearly as much money as was spent this year for contributions to local groups and events. So far this year, the town has given $52,547 in contributions. That includes $30,000 to Sharpsburg Area Emergency Medical Services Inc. for two new ambulances. Mayor Sid Gale is proposing budgeting only $15,000 for contributions this year even though Sharpsburg Volunteer Fire Co. Inc. officials might ask the Town Council for $30,000 for a new building or fire truck.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | April 8, 2002
charlestown@herald-mail.com About a dozen state and local agencies are scheduled to come together Thursday to discuss ways of continuing the battle against littering, an official with one of the groups said Sunday. Roadside littering and open dumps have been ongoing problems in the county, said officials with Keep Jefferson Beautiful Inc., a nonprofit group that formed five years ago. Members of the group believe people who are not customers of Waste Management of the Shenandoah Valley or who do not use some other type of trash removal service sometimes dump their trash around the county.
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