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Liver Transplant

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LIFESTYLE
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | March 24, 2013
Her strength and energy have diminished and her symptoms have become more pronounced. But that hasn't stopped Judy Kinzer Ramer from hanging tough in the biggest fight of her life. She needs a new liver. There is no whining, no complaining, no self-pity. Just the hope that soon she will receive the best possible news: a phone call telling her a donor match has been found. "I want to start living again," the 61-year-old Funks-town resident shared. "And with God's help, maybe things will turn around for me and I can be myself again.
NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | July 28, 2003
katec@herald-mail.com John W. Kesecker, 47, needs help. He's tall and looks strong, but Kesecker is sick. About three years ago, he was diagnosed with hepatitis C, and a severely damaged liver. The virus that leads to the condition causes cirrhosis - irreversible growth of scar tissue - of the liver. The liver makes the blood's platelets, it clears toxins from the body, it's an "energy storage tank," says Linda Ridge, nurse and transplant coordinator at University of Maryland Medical Center in Baltimore.
NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | September 1, 2003
katec@herald-mail.com Wanda "Tiffany" Johnson has a Sept. 4 appointment at University of Maryland hospital in Baltimore. She needs one more medical test to determine whether she will be eligible to be put on a list for a liver transplant at University of Miami in Florida. Johnson, 51, who has lived in Hagerstown for more than 20 years, has hepatitis C, which has led to irreversible damage of her liver. Her illness was caused by a blood transfusion she received during surgery in 1978, she says.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | July 16, 2008
WILLIAMSPORT - About four years ago, Darlene Kirby's life began to fall apart, and she wasn't sure what was happening to her. "I'd fall asleep at my sewing machine," she said of her work at B&B Embroidery in Williamsport. She was also having pains in her side and problems remembering how to do the simplest things. One night, for example, Kirby got up, went to her kitchen and proceeded to take cans out of the cupboards, stacking them around the room. Later, she said she accused her husband, David, of doing it because she had no memory of the events.
NEWS
by KRISTIN WILSON | October 3, 2005
kristinw@herald-mail.com Martha Wiles' liver is totally normal except for one, critical, genetic mutation. Her liver produces a mutant form of the protein transthyretin, or TTR. As this abnormal protein travels throughout her body, it is deposited along her nervous system, creating a thin film that shuts off nerve function. Wiles, of Boonsboro, has a condition called amyloidosis, a disorder affecting thousands of Americans. But she is one of the lucky ones. In 2002, she received a liver transplant that effectively stopped the continued buildup of abnormal proteins.
NEWS
April 24, 1997
Letters to the editor Organs needed To the editor: Some people in this region are affected by a disease called amyloidosis (peripheral neuropathy). The problem originates in the liver, caused by a mutated gene which sends bad protein throughout the body, usually depositing it in the hands and feet. It can also affect the heart and kidneys. The amyloidosis usually does not show symptoms until after the age of 35; therefore each generation can be affected. Anyone with numbness and tingling in the hands and feet or fatigue and unexplained weight loss, should see a physician.
NEWS
June 3, 2008
Each year at this time, seniors at local high schools and colleges gather to receive their diplomas and to hear an inspirational speech from some wise person in the community. Since it's a celebration, the speakers seldom hand out hard truths with the sheepskins, but we will not be so reluctant. Despite the great value our culture places on youth, unless you're a genius, it will probably be several years before you can influence the policy of the company you work for. The same goes for local politics, or even a neighborhood association.
NEWS
May 9, 1997
Halfway man says lack of education about disease causes patient and their families to be stigmatized By Kate Coleman Staff Writer Alton Korzendorfer has four children between the ages of 6 and 13. They all have been vaccinated for hepatitis B. And although they do not have the virus, because their father does, they are stigmatized. "They don't seem to have any friends. People on the outside seem to be pretty much afraid of them," he says. Since his diagnosis in 1992, Korzendorfer and his wife, Lori, whom he describes as a "superwoman," have gone through denial and anger about the disease.
NEWS
January 3, 1997
By BOB PARASILITI Staff Writer Jared Stoner isn't old enough to have seen one of his father's races against the clock. But the 2-month-old son of Earl and Melissa Stoner is in his own race against time. Jared Stoner's opponents are two rare liver diseases - veno occlusive disease and neonatal hemochromatosis - caused by the therapy he needed to fight a cancerous tumor of the adrenal gland. After a week of positive signs, his course of recovery took a bad turn on Wednesday.
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LIFESTYLE
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | March 24, 2013
Her strength and energy have diminished and her symptoms have become more pronounced. But that hasn't stopped Judy Kinzer Ramer from hanging tough in the biggest fight of her life. She needs a new liver. There is no whining, no complaining, no self-pity. Just the hope that soon she will receive the best possible news: a phone call telling her a donor match has been found. "I want to start living again," the 61-year-old Funks-town resident shared. "And with God's help, maybe things will turn around for me and I can be myself again.
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NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com | April 25, 2012
Some of the most lasting friendships are those forged through the tumultuous high school years, but as Pat Simons learned, some of those bonds can grow even stronger when tested by a life-altering event. On Oct. 24, 2011, the day started off on a positive note for the 58-year-old Hagerstown resident. Simons was gearing up to celebrate his granddaughter's birthday, but shortly after arriving at the birthday celebration, his life started to take a dramatic turn. Simons' daughter-in-law, Angie, who is also a registered nurse, was very concerned about her father-in-law's appearance that night.
NEWS
By CHERYL WEAVER / 301-842-0087 | September 30, 2008
Soccer night set for Saturday Clear Spring Soccer Club Youth Night will be Saturday from 4 to 10 p.m. This will be a chance to meet the players and coaches. It will also be a fundraiser for the soccer club with concessions, baked goods, clothing and 50/50 drawings. Christmas in Clear Spring It's hard to believe, but Christmas is just around the corner. It is also the year for the Clear Spring Garden Club to host "Christmas in Clear Spring" again.  It will be held on Saturday, Dec. 13, from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. The club is asking that anyone in the main part of town (within walking distance of Cumberland Street)
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | July 16, 2008
WILLIAMSPORT - About four years ago, Darlene Kirby's life began to fall apart, and she wasn't sure what was happening to her. "I'd fall asleep at my sewing machine," she said of her work at B&B Embroidery in Williamsport. She was also having pains in her side and problems remembering how to do the simplest things. One night, for example, Kirby got up, went to her kitchen and proceeded to take cans out of the cupboards, stacking them around the room. Later, she said she accused her husband, David, of doing it because she had no memory of the events.
NEWS
June 3, 2008
Each year at this time, seniors at local high schools and colleges gather to receive their diplomas and to hear an inspirational speech from some wise person in the community. Since it's a celebration, the speakers seldom hand out hard truths with the sheepskins, but we will not be so reluctant. Despite the great value our culture places on youth, unless you're a genius, it will probably be several years before you can influence the policy of the company you work for. The same goes for local politics, or even a neighborhood association.
NEWS
By TARA REILLY | April 23, 2006
GREENCASTLE, Pa. - When a local teenager's mother told him to remember an injured toddler in his prayers, he did more than pray for her. He raised $8,600 to help her and her family. Brandon Trefelner, 14, sold purple wristbands for $2 each to benefit Prayer Wenger, who suffered brain damage in a near-fatal swimming pool accident in July 2005. She was 17 months old. Thanks to Brandon's efforts, Prayer's parents, Lisa and Michael Wenger, were able to purchase several items, among them a hot tub for their daughter's therapy.
NEWS
March 24, 2006
"I'd like to know why everybody wants to blame the schools for teen pregnancy. The teens aren't having sex at school. They're having it after school. This falls on the parents' obligation to be a good parent. They need to know where their children are and how to get a hold of them at all times. If they go someplace, get a number. Call and make sure they're there. It's very easy to do, but they just want to pass on the blame. It wouldn't be this bad if society would just let parents correct their children properly.
NEWS
by KRISTIN WILSON | October 3, 2005
kristinw@herald-mail.com Martha Wiles' liver is totally normal except for one, critical, genetic mutation. Her liver produces a mutant form of the protein transthyretin, or TTR. As this abnormal protein travels throughout her body, it is deposited along her nervous system, creating a thin film that shuts off nerve function. Wiles, of Boonsboro, has a condition called amyloidosis, a disorder affecting thousands of Americans. But she is one of the lucky ones. In 2002, she received a liver transplant that effectively stopped the continued buildup of abnormal proteins.
NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | September 1, 2003
katec@herald-mail.com Wanda "Tiffany" Johnson has a Sept. 4 appointment at University of Maryland hospital in Baltimore. She needs one more medical test to determine whether she will be eligible to be put on a list for a liver transplant at University of Miami in Florida. Johnson, 51, who has lived in Hagerstown for more than 20 years, has hepatitis C, which has led to irreversible damage of her liver. Her illness was caused by a blood transfusion she received during surgery in 1978, she says.
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