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Literacy

NEWS
December 6, 2005
Eleven literacy tutors completed a two-part workshop training session Nov. 12 and 19, given by the Literacy Council of Washington County. The new tutors are: Maury Badger, Allan Bare, John Campbell, Karen Dickie, Jean Hamilton, Nancy Horst, Tom Horst, Eileen Hanlin, Flaherty Immer, Donna Johnson, Nadine Levelston and Beverly Nichols. Nine of the graduates are from Washington County and eight have been placed with students. According to Becky Hein, director of student/tutor placement for the Council, there are 17 students waiting for tutors.
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NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | June 10, 2000
More than 16,000 Washington County residents read at a fourth-grade level or below, and members of a dozen local literacy and educational groups say they have resources to help them. The groups participated in a literacy fair Saturday at the Washington County Free Library. Nearly 300 people attended the fair, which ran from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., said Kathleen O'Connell, assistant director for the library. "We're holding the fair to promote literacy in Washington County and to show people out there who need it how many resources are available to help them," O'Connell said.
NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | August 7, 2002
The Hagerstown City Council on Tuesday gave general support for a proposed computer literacy training program for low- to moderate-income community residents. The projected budget for the program at the city-owned Hagerstown Telework Center is $117,112, according to documents provided to the council. The center, which has 17 computers, is part of the Elizabeth Hager Center at 14 N. Potomac St. June Wright, who works part time at the center, told the council the program could teach computer skills to 65 to 85 people a year.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | October 7, 2002
pepperb@herald-mail.com Hancock Elementary School received a $149,935 state grant for a literacy program beginning this school year. Achievement First, a Maryland Department of Education standardized reading and writing program, aims to bring students' test scores up to grade performance levels within a three-year period. Test scores improved last year, but Hancock Principal Donna Newcomer-Coble said she thinks with the new program they will get even better. Hancock and Fountaindale elementary schools, both Title I schools which get more state and federal funding due to poverty levels based on free and reduced meals, are working under the same type of state grant, said JoEtta Palcovitz-Brown, schools executive director of elementary education.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | April 16, 2009
BOONSBORO -- When Atchara Ross came to America two years ago from her native Thailand, she could read and write some English but her speaking skills needed work. Then she met Diane Sanford, a volunteer with the Literacy Council of Washington County, and her life changed dramatically for the better. "Unfortunately, she had to wait a year," Sanford said as she met with Ross at the Boonsboro Free Library, a branch of the Washington County Free Library. The two have been working together for nearly a year, and Sanford said Ross' progress has been phenomenal.
NEWS
April 1, 2002
Poor literacy contributes to poor finances By Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes Literacy - the ability to read, to comprehend and to analyze a written text - is widely recognized to be indispensable in a modern society, and yet the critical importance in our modern economy of financial literacy - the comparable ability to read, grasp and analyze financial information - is regularly overlooked. Indeed, there is growing evidence that Americans do not have an adequate basis for making sound decisions about their personal and household finances, especially given the myriad of choices they face.
NEWS
by BOB MAGINNIS | September 9, 2002
The Interfaith Coalition of Washington County has an ambitious plan for tomorrow's service, scheduled for 4 p.m. at St. John's Lutheran Church at 141 S. Potomac St. in Hagerstown. The group, formed after the Sept. 11 attack to promote communication and understanding between those of different faiths, hopes to do the following tomorrow: "To bear witness to peace and mutual respect to all people desiring to discover the mystery of God that brings unity and understanding to the human family in the midst of tragedy.
OPINION
By DAVID HANLIN | April 11, 2012
My June column challenged the old belief that a high school education was sufficient in order to get a high-paying job. I presented the argument that in today's world, college or technical training are increasingly important. My column this month returns to the topic of education, exploring the need for a community-wide focus on childhood literacy. I am president of the Rotary Club of Hagerstown. Rotary International directs its clubs and members to work toward improvements in six areas of focus.
LIFESTYLE
December 2, 2011
Literacy Council of Washington County hosted a tutor-training workshop in October. Volunteers will work with people learning to read English or learning English as a second language. At the literacy council's annual meeting Sept. 17, new officers were elected: Cindy Hockenbury is the new president, replacing the outgoing president, Milt Creager. Kevin Fox will be the new vice president, replacing Barbara Creager. For more information about volunteering, call Brenda at Literacy Council of Washington County at 301-739-4208 or go to www.literacyofwcmd.org . The office is open Tuesdays and Thursdays.
LIFESTYLE
May 23, 2012
Literacy Council of Washington County hosted volunteer tutor training in April. Volunteer trainers are trained to teach others how to read. The Literacy Council had 13 individuals who participated in the April 14 and April 28 workshop. They are Andrew Haldeman, Ann Menard, Ann Mummert, Beverly Powell, Courtney Daniell, Florence Grant, Jean LaMarca, Laurie Sexton, Lourdes Francisco, Marjorie Von Drach, Becky Henson, Stella Bagot and Stephanie Steel. For more information about the Literacy Council of Washington County, call 301-739-4208 during office hours from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays.
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