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NEWS
December 14, 2009
Students in Catherine White's first-grade class at Potomac Heights Elementary School recently completed a service project for the holidays, which resulted in holiday cards, personal supplies and other goodies being sent to men and women serving in the military. The cards were created by the students after a discussion of the sacrifices the troops are making, especially during the holidays. The large collection of candy, socks, toys, gum, lip balm and other supplies, as well as the cards, will be earmarked for a Maryland unit.
NEWS
April 14, 2003
Members of Hagerstown AMVETS Post 10, 770 Frederick St. in Hagerstown, are collecting personal care and hygiene items to be sent to U.S. troops in Iraq. Items needed include: toothbrushes, toothpaste, soap, disposable razors, shaving cream, lip balm, sunscreen, wipes, facial tissues, bandages, sunglasses, foot powder, bottled water, writing paper, envelopes and pens, combs, after-shave lotion, women's personal needs and similar nonperishable and unbreakable items. The items should be dropped at the AMVETS Post.
NEWS
By DON AINES | February 20, 2009
WAYNESBORO, Pa. -- Plastic from corn, lip balm from soybeans and glue from milk were some of the science of agriculture that students at Hooverville Elementary School learned this week while visiting the Mobile Ag Ed Science Center. Sponsored by the Pennsylvania Farm Bureau, the center is one of four mobile labs that brings agricultural science to schools, said retired teacher Carol Henicle, who was giving a Friday morning tour to a class of third-graders. "They want them to learn about farming because it's the number one industry in Pennsylvania," Henicle said before the students began two experiments on "The Mighty Smooth Bean," the soybean, second only to corn in the number of acres planted in Franklin County.
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | October 16, 2004
The REACH Cold Weather Shelter for the Homeless opens on Sunday, Nov. 14, at First Christian Church, 1345 Potomac Ave. The following items are needed and are being collected Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the REACH Office at Christ's Reformed Church, 130 W. Franklin St., at the rear side entrance with the burgundy doors and the REACH Sign. Other times by appointment. Needed are ground and instant coffee, powdered drink mixes, condiment packets, instant hot chocolate, sugar and creamer shakers, powdered milk, disposable salt and pepper shakers, dry cereal, instant cup of noodles, instant oatmeal packets, paper napkins, heavy duty paper plates and bowls, hot cups, plastic utensils, paper towels, toilet paper, and personal hygiene items such as deodorant, foot powder, shaving cream and toothpaste.
NEWS
November 10, 2005
HANCOCK - Advertised as a program to "Keep A Senior Safe And Warm," a Nov. 5 workshop at the Hancock Town Hall/Community Center apparently worked. "We had 38 seniors attending - it was great," said Debbie Cohill, executive director of the Interfaith Service Coalition in Hancock. Speakers represented the Hancock police and fire departments, the ISC, War Memorial Hospital and others in the community who are concerned with the well-being of seniors, Cohill said. Information focused on helping senior citizens stay healthy and safe during the winter months.
NEWS
By MEG H. PARTINGTON | December 24, 1998
When fireplaces start to roar this winter, the logs won't be the only things crackling. Exposure to the low humidity of the colder months can parch the lips, sometimes to a painful point. Unlike the rest of the skin on the body, the lips do not harden and therefore need to remain moist, according to Dr. James Schiro, a dermatologist in Hagerstown. When their lips get dry, people tend to lick them, a process that, if repeated too often, will remove the oil protective barrier and make them even drier, he says.
NEWS
November 5, 2004
Staff and volunteers at REACH are set to open the 2004-2005 Cold Weather Shelter on Nov. 14. The congregational-based, rotating shelter is open seven days a week - Monday through Saturday from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. and Sunday from 3 p.m. to 7 a.m. The shelter's first site is First Christian Church, 1345 Potomac Ave., Hagerstown, from Nov. 14-28. The rest of the schedule includes: · Grace United Methodist Church, Winter and Church streets, Nov. 28-Dec. 1. · Hagerstown Church of the Brethren, 15 S. Mulberry St., Dec. 12-26.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | December 6, 2010
Fueled by hot chocolate and warmed by a bonfire, children darted around Cherry Run Farm on Sunday as adults strapped Christmas trees to pickup trucks and sport utility vehicles. Jeff Hull, who owns the farm with his wife, Beth, said families need little guidance when selecting among the Fraser fir, concolor fir, blue spruce and Douglas fir trees. “The best advice I can give is beauty is in the eyes of the beholder,” Jeff Hull said. Some people prefer the concolor firs for their citrus scent, while others like the blue spruces because they can hold heavy ornaments, he said.
NEWS
March 17, 2007
Thumbs up to Col. Annette M. Deener , for the service she has provided to the nation since 1975, first in the Army Reserve and then as a member of the Maryland National Guard. In 2005, she became the chief of staff for the Guard - the first woman to hold that position. She did all this while she and her husband raised a family. For her performance, she was named one of five 2007 inductees to the Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Thumbs up to Maryland Del. LeRoy E. Myers Jr., for allowing his bill to prohibit the display of plastic genitalia or buttocks to die. It's not a topic for legislation, although it is sad that Americans too often use their freedom of speech not to enlighten, but to express what is vulgar.
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | January 24, 2003
marlob@herald-mail.com When the schedule is made up each year for the REACH Cold Weather Shelter season, larger churches are earmarked to host the shelter in January and February, when temperatures tend to dip, REACH director Terri Baker said. That practice proved its value this year, when the number of shelter patrons soared as the thermometer has stayed well below the freezing mark for days at a time, officials said. "The shelter is currently being hosted by Trinity Lutheran Church, 15 Randolph Ave., which is one of our larger sites," Baker said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | December 6, 2010
Fueled by hot chocolate and warmed by a bonfire, children darted around Cherry Run Farm on Sunday as adults strapped Christmas trees to pickup trucks and sport utility vehicles. Jeff Hull, who owns the farm with his wife, Beth, said families need little guidance when selecting among the Fraser fir, concolor fir, blue spruce and Douglas fir trees. “The best advice I can give is beauty is in the eyes of the beholder,” Jeff Hull said. Some people prefer the concolor firs for their citrus scent, while others like the blue spruces because they can hold heavy ornaments, he said.
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NEWS
December 14, 2009
Students in Catherine White's first-grade class at Potomac Heights Elementary School recently completed a service project for the holidays, which resulted in holiday cards, personal supplies and other goodies being sent to men and women serving in the military. The cards were created by the students after a discussion of the sacrifices the troops are making, especially during the holidays. The large collection of candy, socks, toys, gum, lip balm and other supplies, as well as the cards, will be earmarked for a Maryland unit.
NEWS
By DON AINES | February 20, 2009
WAYNESBORO, Pa. -- Plastic from corn, lip balm from soybeans and glue from milk were some of the science of agriculture that students at Hooverville Elementary School learned this week while visiting the Mobile Ag Ed Science Center. Sponsored by the Pennsylvania Farm Bureau, the center is one of four mobile labs that brings agricultural science to schools, said retired teacher Carol Henicle, who was giving a Friday morning tour to a class of third-graders. "They want them to learn about farming because it's the number one industry in Pennsylvania," Henicle said before the students began two experiments on "The Mighty Smooth Bean," the soybean, second only to corn in the number of acres planted in Franklin County.
NEWS
March 17, 2007
Thumbs up to Col. Annette M. Deener , for the service she has provided to the nation since 1975, first in the Army Reserve and then as a member of the Maryland National Guard. In 2005, she became the chief of staff for the Guard - the first woman to hold that position. She did all this while she and her husband raised a family. For her performance, she was named one of five 2007 inductees to the Maryland Women's Hall of Fame. Thumbs up to Maryland Del. LeRoy E. Myers Jr., for allowing his bill to prohibit the display of plastic genitalia or buttocks to die. It's not a topic for legislation, although it is sad that Americans too often use their freedom of speech not to enlighten, but to express what is vulgar.
NEWS
November 10, 2005
HANCOCK - Advertised as a program to "Keep A Senior Safe And Warm," a Nov. 5 workshop at the Hancock Town Hall/Community Center apparently worked. "We had 38 seniors attending - it was great," said Debbie Cohill, executive director of the Interfaith Service Coalition in Hancock. Speakers represented the Hancock police and fire departments, the ISC, War Memorial Hospital and others in the community who are concerned with the well-being of seniors, Cohill said. Information focused on helping senior citizens stay healthy and safe during the winter months.
NEWS
November 5, 2004
Staff and volunteers at REACH are set to open the 2004-2005 Cold Weather Shelter on Nov. 14. The congregational-based, rotating shelter is open seven days a week - Monday through Saturday from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. and Sunday from 3 p.m. to 7 a.m. The shelter's first site is First Christian Church, 1345 Potomac Ave., Hagerstown, from Nov. 14-28. The rest of the schedule includes: · Grace United Methodist Church, Winter and Church streets, Nov. 28-Dec. 1. · Hagerstown Church of the Brethren, 15 S. Mulberry St., Dec. 12-26.
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | October 16, 2004
The REACH Cold Weather Shelter for the Homeless opens on Sunday, Nov. 14, at First Christian Church, 1345 Potomac Ave. The following items are needed and are being collected Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the REACH Office at Christ's Reformed Church, 130 W. Franklin St., at the rear side entrance with the burgundy doors and the REACH Sign. Other times by appointment. Needed are ground and instant coffee, powdered drink mixes, condiment packets, instant hot chocolate, sugar and creamer shakers, powdered milk, disposable salt and pepper shakers, dry cereal, instant cup of noodles, instant oatmeal packets, paper napkins, heavy duty paper plates and bowls, hot cups, plastic utensils, paper towels, toilet paper, and personal hygiene items such as deodorant, foot powder, shaving cream and toothpaste.
NEWS
April 14, 2003
Members of Hagerstown AMVETS Post 10, 770 Frederick St. in Hagerstown, are collecting personal care and hygiene items to be sent to U.S. troops in Iraq. Items needed include: toothbrushes, toothpaste, soap, disposable razors, shaving cream, lip balm, sunscreen, wipes, facial tissues, bandages, sunglasses, foot powder, bottled water, writing paper, envelopes and pens, combs, after-shave lotion, women's personal needs and similar nonperishable and unbreakable items. The items should be dropped at the AMVETS Post.
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | January 24, 2003
marlob@herald-mail.com When the schedule is made up each year for the REACH Cold Weather Shelter season, larger churches are earmarked to host the shelter in January and February, when temperatures tend to dip, REACH director Terri Baker said. That practice proved its value this year, when the number of shelter patrons soared as the thermometer has stayed well below the freezing mark for days at a time, officials said. "The shelter is currently being hosted by Trinity Lutheran Church, 15 Randolph Ave., which is one of our larger sites," Baker said.
NEWS
By MEG H. PARTINGTON | December 24, 1998
When fireplaces start to roar this winter, the logs won't be the only things crackling. Exposure to the low humidity of the colder months can parch the lips, sometimes to a painful point. Unlike the rest of the skin on the body, the lips do not harden and therefore need to remain moist, according to Dr. James Schiro, a dermatologist in Hagerstown. When their lips get dry, people tend to lick them, a process that, if repeated too often, will remove the oil protective barrier and make them even drier, he says.
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