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Lethal Injection

NEWS
July 15, 2006
Here are some of the calls we have received lately: "This is for the person who called in about getting disability and working, too. Well, it's real simple. They're not 100 percent disabled. They can work so many hours a week. Since we're still working the government don't have to give us as much money. That's the answer. " - Hagerstown "No longer is Boonsboro made up of medium-income people or low-income people. It is mostly rich people coming down from the big cities and taking over Boonsboro.
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NEWS
By DON AINES | September 22, 2000
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Franklin County Court of Common Pleas Judge Douglas W. Herman on Friday established a "cooling-off" period in the death penalty case of Michael Brandon Singley, ordering the penalty phase to be continued until the January trial term. "The judge said a cooling-off period would be appropriate considering the extensive publicity" from a degree of guilt hearing held Tuesday, said Public Defender Robert J. Trambley, who is representing Singley with co-counsel Michael Toms.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | November 15, 1998
Sometime next week, unless Gov. Parris Glendening grants clemency, Maryland will execute Tyrone Gilliam by lethal injection for killing Christine Doerfler of Baltimore County during a 1988 robbery. If a random poll of Tri-State area residents taken Saturday is any indication, Maryland is doing the right thing by taking Gilliam's life. "If the guy killed somebody, then do what the law says. Take his life," said Kenny Stoner, 53, of Hagerstown. Charles Van Metre, 64, of Shepherdstown, W.Va.
NEWS
By DON AINES | October 13, 1998
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - A Franklin County jury sentenced Albert Ezron Reid to death Monday after he refused to allow attorneys to argue he was mentally ill. "His mental illness prevented his mental illness testimony from getting in," Public Defender Robert J. Trambley said after the jury deliberated an hour before deciding Reid, 49, should die by lethal injection for the murders of his estranged wife and stepdaughter. --cont. from front page -- "Surely it's frustrating, but I don't pay the price for it ... he's going to pay for it with his life," co-counsel Stephen D. Kulla said.
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