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Lethal Injection

NEWS
May 17, 2001
It's a bad time to distrust FBI No kidding, Timothy McVeigh's execution is now scheduled to occur on my birthday, which makes me a little nervous. I hope they don't grab the wrong Tim. Well? With our FBI, anything is possible. How annoying would that be? - they're going down their day-planner for the 11th and see the name Tim and without bothering to find any supporting documents, the first thing you know is I get juiced and McVeigh gets a card. Well, I guess it isn't "juiced" anymore, now that we've humanely swapped the electric chair for lethal injection.
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NEWS
By BOB MAGINNIS | May 13, 2008
Right now, Republican members of Washington County's Maryland General Assembly delegation should be asking themselves these two questions: Did Gov. Martin O'Malley mean what he said when he was here last Thursday? And, even if the governor is serious about having no animosity toward the local Republicans who've opposed him, will his allies in the legislature feel the same way? O'Malley and some of his cabinet officers were here last week as part of the state's "Capital for a Day" program.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | May 29, 2008
WASHINGTON COUNTY -- After bills to repeal Maryland's death penalty failed for two straight years, a commission will study the state's capital punishment system instead. During the 2008 legislative session, the Maryland General Assembly agreed to create the Maryland Commission on Capital Punishment and give it nearly six months to issue a report. The process of picking commission members is still under way, Christine Hansen, a spokeswoman for Gov. Martin O'Malley, said Wednesday.
NEWS
by LISA TEDRICK PREJEAN | October 10, 2003
In an average lifetime, you will breathe more than 75 million gallons of air - about 1 1/2 times the total capacity of the airship Hindenburg. Your intestines will process 40 tons of food. You will take 1 billion steps, walking about 77,000 miles. These are just a few of the interesting tidbits featured in a display at Valley Mall presented by Discovery Station at Hagerstown Inc. "Inside Out: The Visible Human" is a part of the National Library of Medicine's Visible Human Project.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | February 6, 2005
pepperb@herald-mail.com WASHINGTON COUNTY - Although the morality of the death penalty has been a matter of debate for years among those from opposite sides of the political spectrum, a different debate takes place behind the doors of prosecutors who decide whether first-degree charges warrant making a case for the ultimate sentence. In Maryland, prosecutors who are considering seeking the death penalty on first-degree murder charges - premeditated murder or felony murder - must determine whether the aggravating factors, or circumstances that determine whether the death penalty can be sought, exist in the case.
NEWS
By ERIN JULIUS | January 18, 2008
ELLICOTT CITY, Md. ? Brandon T. Morris was found guilty Friday of first-degree murder in the January 2006 shooting death of Roxbury Correctional Institution Officer Jeffery A. Wroten at Washington County Hospital. The verdict qualifies Morris, 22, of Baltimore, for the death penalty. The trial's sentencing phase begins Tuesday. Wroten's ex-wife and one of his five children were among those in the nearly-full Howard County Circuit courtroom as the jury's foreman read the verdict.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | September 21, 2006
HAGERSTOWN - The trial for an inmate charged with murder in the death a Roxbury Correctional Institution officer will be moved out of Washington County. Circuit Judge Frederick C. Wright III granted Brandon T. Morris' request for a change of venue during a motions hearing Wednesday in Washington County Circuit Court. Morris' attorneys argued that pretrial publicity and a large number of employees at state prisons in the county and Washington County Hospital would prevent Morris from getting a fair trial here.
NEWS
March 26, 2009
Serafini offers amendment to death penalty bill ANNAPOLIS (AP) -- Maryland lawmakers on Thursday approved limits to how the death penalty can be used, with supporters saying it will help protect innocent people from execution, but opponents calling the restrictions a practical end to capital punishment in Maryland. The measure, which was approved by the House of Delegates 87-52, restricts the death penalty to murder cases with biological evidence such as DNA, videotaped evidence of a murder or a videotaped confession.
NEWS
by Lloyd Waters | March 18, 2007
When our new country was born we killed the British to preserve our freedoms. As we became a nation, we killed the Indians to acquire their lands, and then we killed each other to preserve our government. To make sure our society remained safe, we have killed those villains who would kill others. When it comes to killing, we seem quite familiar with the subject matter, huh? In our society today, 38 states, including Maryland, agree that capital punishment is a reasonable penalty, and it is primarily used against those who would kill others.
NEWS
By ERIN JULIUS | January 19, 2008
ELLICOTT CITY, Md. - Brandon T. Morris was found guilty Friday of first-degree murder in the January 2006 shooting death of Roxbury Correctional Institution Officer Jeffery A. Wroten. The verdict qualifies Morris, 22, of Baltimore, for the death penalty. The trial's sentencing phase begins Tuesday. Wroten's ex-wife and one of his five children were among those in the nearly-full Howard County Circuit courtroom as the jury's foreman read the verdict. Morris showed no reaction, even after guilty verdicts for three capital offenses were read.
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