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NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | December 29, 2006
EASTERN PANHANDLE, W.VA. - Tighter controls on how cities can annex land, relief from high jail costs and funding to help extend Raleigh Street in Martinsburg to alleviate traffic congestion are among the issues local officials hope Eastern Panhandle lawmakers can tackle for them in the upcoming session of the Legislature. The Legislature convenes Jan. 10 in Charleston, W.Va., and Gov. Joe Manchin will get things started that day with the annual State of the State address. Annexation Jefferson County officials for some time have been concerned about state annexation laws that allow cities to use narrow pieces of land to reach larger tracts away from city boundaries.
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NEWS
by TRISH RUDDER | December 19, 2006
BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.Va. - Charles S. Trump IV said he is at peace with no longer being a delegate in the West Virginia House of Representatives. He said he is looking forward to spending more time in the Eastern Panhandle and that he believes turnover in the Legislature is "healthier for the institution. " About a year ago, Trump decided not to run for re-election as delegate for the 51st District after serving 14 years and representing parts of Morgan, Berkeley and Hampshire counties.
NEWS
December 13, 1999
After more than two years of study, members of a West Virginia legislative study committee say they'll offer a bill to deal with the state's many "gray" video-poker machines. If what the committee proposes amounts to a full-scale legalization of slot machines, we're opposed. No such recommendation has been made yet, but may be, given the difficulties in enforcing the rules regarding video-poker machines. The so-called "gray machines" are commonly found in bars and convenience stores and are legal to play for amusement only.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | September 8, 2007
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Beginning Sunday at noon, area residents will have the opportunity to avoid the 300-plus-mile trip to Charleston, W.Va., to gain a little insight on just how the state Legislature works, if only in the off-season. In addition to the 60-day regular session that begins each year in January, lawmakers are expected to take part in interim committee meetings, which are held to study issues and potential legislation. All of the meetings, which will be held Sunday through Tuesday afternoon at the Holiday Inn in Martinsburg and other locations in the Eastern Panhandle, are open to the public, and elected officials are hoping area residents attend and participate in the sessions.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | March 8, 2008
MARTINSBURG, W.VA. -- Legislation to reform the public school funding formula cleared the West Virginia Legislature in the waning hours of the regular session Saturday while area lawmakers continued to wage a battle to kill a "toll roads" bill that eyed three Eastern Panhandle highways. The final version of bill for public school funding (House Bill 4588) didn't entirely satisfy Eastern Panhandle lawmakers, who said they agreed to compromise to gain at least some benefit. A proposed property tax break for seniors (Senate Bill 239)
NEWS
January 11, 2000
If you're looking for a good legislative agenda to get behind as the Maryland General Assembly fires into action this week, may I suggest you need look no further than the goals set forth by Del. Joe Bartlett, R-Frederick/Washington. In a legislative preview in a regional publication, one State House correspondent wrote that Bartlett "has plans to restore respect to the teaching profession and reduce the number of deer killed on the state's roads. " I couldn't agree more on these priorities.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | March 4, 2008
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Some Shepherdstown-area residents have expressed concern about rock blasting for construction projects in their community over the years, feeling that work might have contributed to cracks in older homes that are more susceptible to the blasts, Del. John Doyle said. Doyle, D-Jefferson, said the state Fire Marshal's office regulates blasting, but officials in that office told him that they do not have the personnel to oversee all blasting operations in the Eastern Panhandle.
NEWS
by MATTHEW UMSTEAD | January 10, 2007
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - As the most-tenured lawmaker in the West Virginia House of Delegates, Berkeley County Republican John Overington today will preside over the swearing-in of the 100-member body and the formal election of Speaker Rick Thompson, D-Wayne, and Minority Leader Tim Armstead. Democrats hold a commanding 72-28 majority in the House of Delegates. "I would have never thought in 1984, I would (one day) be the most senior person," Overington said. Overington, 60, said he plans to use the opportunity to recognize his mother, Helen Besley Overington, 99, who will make her first trip to Charleston, W.Va.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | March 5, 2008
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Legislation that would give tax relief to West Virginia's senior citizens and airplane owners cleared the House Finance Committee on Tuesday, committee member Del. Craig Blair said. Senate Bills 239 and 265 now up for consideration on the House floor, said Blair, R-Berkeley. The legislation for seniors especially benefits property owners age 65 and older whose income is below $25,000 per year. It gives them the opportunity to choose to defer property tax increases or apply for a tax rebate of a tax increase.
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