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NEWS
March 22, 2012
Some rules, noted the late comedian George Carlin, shouldn't be necessary. “No running with the scissors,” for example, was one that he said made eminent sense, even to a little kid. Most recently, Pennsylvania has made texting behind the wheel illegal, soon to be joined by West Virginia (where...
OPINION
By TOM FIREY | January 25, 2012
In August 2010, 19-year-old Daniel Schatz ran his pickup truck into the back of a tractor-trailer on Interstate 44 near Gray Summit, Mo. The collision set off a chain-reaction accident with two school buses, killing Schatz and a 15-year-old bus passenger, Jessica Brinker. Investigators later discovered that Schatz had been exchanging text messages on his cell phone while he drove, sending six and receiving five in the 11 minutes prior to the crash. The wreck underscores the danger of driving while distracted.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | December 12, 2011
Limits on passengers, increased on-the-road training and traffic stops for seat belt violations will start affecting Pennsylvania's teenage drivers in just weeks. The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation partnered with police agencies Monday to raise awareness about changes to teen driving laws. PennDOT scheduled police to visit 20 high schools in Cumberland, Dauphin, Franklin and Perry counties. Among them were Greencastle-Antrim High School and Chambersburg Area Senior High School.
NEWS
September 30, 2000
News laws go into effect By LAURA ERNDE / Staff Writer South Mountain officially becomes the first state battlefield park today, a designation that is one of nearly 300 laws passed by the Maryland General Assembly and going into effect today. The first visible signs of the battlefield designation won't be seen until next year. The park has requested about $500,000 in operating money from the Maryland Department of Natural Resources' 2002 budget, which begins in July, said Al Preston, assistant manager of the South Mountain Recreation Area.
NEWS
October 1, 1998
Other local laws taking effect today: - Allow alcoholic beverages to be sold in restaurants on Sundays starting at 11 a.m. instead of noon. The law also increases the Sunday hours of operation at bars if the following Monday is a federal holiday. - Increase the salary of the Washington County State's Attorney from $67,840 a year to $90,428, an increase of more than 33 percent. The raise does not actually take effect until after this year's election in November. Incumbent State's Attorney M. Kenneth Long Jr. is running unopposed.
NEWS
by TESSA WALLS | November 7, 2006
Do you know what today is? Another school day canceled because teachers want a break? Big Foot took over the world? Think again. Students do not have school today because of Election Day. Many teenagers are oblivious to why they get a free day but could really care less. The main reason? Teenagers don't think elections matter to them. In order to vote, a person must be 18 or older. Teenagers today do not seem to take a big part in politics. Sure, everyone has opinions about who is running for office and what they believe in, but teenagers seem to think that politics are about nothing but fun. Although if teenagers today had more of a say in what laws took place, they would probably think a little bit differently when Election Day rolled around.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | February 20, 1999
WAYNESBORO, Pa. - Frustrated by a system that they say offers little help in getting their ex-boyfriends to pay child support for their children, some Waynesboro women are starting an effort to change the nation's child-support laws. The women say states operate under different rules, making it hard for parents to track down ex-partners or get them to pay child support. "We were sitting around drinking Pepsi and smoking one day after Christmas, and we started talking about the problems we were having getting child support," said Bonnie Cochran, 54. Her daughter, Massina Cochran, 24, has been unable to get child support from the father of her 3-year-old daughter, she said.
NEWS
By KIMBERLY YAKOWSKI | June 30, 1999
Beginning today, driving laws for new motorists will be a lot tougher, a policy some local teenagers say they support. "It will be kind of annoying waiting longer to drive on my own, but it makes sense," said Rachael Hefner, a South Hagerstown High School student. [cont. from front page ] Hefner, 16, said she considers herself a responsible driver, but said she knows others her age who aren't. When she receives her learner's permit she will be subject to rules under the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration's Graduated Licensing System.
NEWS
October 15, 2004
It may seem like piling on to say this again, but Martinsburg City Councilman Frank Idoni needs to get the message that law enforcement must be left to police officers. Elected officials who imagine they can do as well as trained police officers are as misguided as those who substitute home remedies for a doctor's prescriptions. On Wednesday Idoni was charged in Berkeley County Magistrate Court with allegedly punching and spitting on a teenager who Idoni felt was driving too fast.
NEWS
by BRIAN SHAPPELL | July 1, 2004
shappell@herald-mail.com Nearly all motorized scooters will be subject to the same laws as other motor vehicles in the wake of talks between Washington County authorities and the State's Attorney's Office, a Washington County Sheriff's Department captain said. That word comes just a few weeks after the sheriff's department said it would strictly enforce laws governing the use of some motorized scooters. Washington County Sheriff's Department Capt. Doug Mullendore said area authorities will continue to strengthen enforcement of motor vehicle laws because of recent talks with the Washington County State's Attorney's Office.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthewu@herald-mail.com | August 24, 2013
It was not just another march on that hot August day on the mall in the nation's capital, but James Tolbert had no way of knowing ahead of time how that march, and the speech of one man, would go down in history. Tolbert, of Charles Town, W.Va., and his friend, George Lewis, were not aware they were stepping into history when they boarded a train in Harpers Ferry, W.Va., bound for Washington D.C., on Aug. 28, 1963. Tolbert and Lewis, who since has died, were among the thousands of people who took part in the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, the landmark rally that culminated in front of the Lincoln Memorial.
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NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthewu@herald-mail.com | August 10, 2013
More than 500 people turned out Saturday for the first day of the Gun & Outdoor Sportsman Expo at Hager Hall Conference & Event Center, according to organizers. Leah Ryder said she and fellow Hager Hall Sales Manager Jacinta Ingream were “a little leery” about turnout, because a large gun show is being held in Philadelphia this weekend. But they were pleased that more than 50 vendors still decided to take part in the Hagerstown show. The show, which features hunting, archery, gun and knife vendors, children safety activities, including free fingerprinting ID kits, continues Sunday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Admission is $7. A deer-hunting rifle and a gun rack for an all-terrain vehicle will be given away at 2:30 p.m., Sunday, said Ryder, who thanked Hendershots Sporting Goods Inc., and Twiggs Cycles in Hagerstown for supporting the giveaways.
EDUCATION
July 14, 2013
John T. Strauss, son of Drs. Albert and Kelli Strauss, is a distinguished honor roll student enrolled in the Academic Leadership Program at South Hagerstown High School, Class of 2016. He is attending the National Youth Leadership Forum on Law and Crime Scene Investigation course in Washington, D.C. During the six-day program, students will be introduced to careers in the legal profession and forensic science. He was selected from a nationwide pool of candidates based on his academic performance and his interest in law as a profession.
OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | July 14, 2013
“If I'm not doing anything wrong, why should I care about surveillance?” To quote the late David Foster Wallace, this argument is so stupid it practically drools. So allow me to count the ways: 1. Just because you have nothing to hide today doesn't mean you will have nothing to hide tomorrow. Legislatures are always passing new laws against what was heretofore rather normal behavior. One community tried to pass an ordinance requiring its citizens to carry a gun. See any problem there, especially if you don't care to pack heat?
NEWS
By C.J. LOVELACE | cj.lovelace@herald-mail.com | July 9, 2013
Panhandling is something that just about every city police department across the nation deals with on a regular basis, Hagerstown Police Lt. Paul Kifer said. “It's everywhere,” Kifer said Monday. “No matter where you go, especially in a city environment.” And the Hub City is not immune. Simply asking for money or cigarettes from people walking the streets is not illegal, according to Kifer. However, “aggressive panhandling” - in which people continue begging after they have been told to stop - is a reportable and enforceable offense, he said.
NEWS
By HOLLY SHOK | holly.shok@herald-mail.com | July 7, 2013
An update to state law that requires residential battery-operated smoke alarms to be replaced with ones having long-life, sealed-in batteries by 2018 went into effect July 1. The change is a result of cleaning up sections of the fire laws of Maryland that had been in place for 38 years, Deputy State Fire Marshal Bruce D. Bouch said last week. The law stipulates that homeowners replace battery-operated alarms that are at the end of their 10-year lifespan or once they reach the end of their 10-year lifespan with a unit powered by a 10-year sealed-in battery.
OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | July 3, 2013
OK, it's July 4, 2013, and the nation is 237 years old today. So to recap: We have a U.S. citizen hiding out in the heart of the former USSR because America wants to prosecute his right to free speech; judicial seats are going unfilled because Congress is putting politics ahead of the law; we deny accommodations to immigrants; the IRS is targeting groups based on their political views; the U.S. House of Representatives is so dysfunctional that even...
OPINION
June 30, 2013
How often do we celebrate or mourn that a great statesman did or did not live to see his or her life's work advance upon the world stage? Conversely, Nelson Mandela might have lived long enough to see minority voting rights take a major step backward in the world's (ostensibly) leading beacon of freedom. A practical necessity a half-century ago, the Voting Rights Act has always had uncomfortable legal underpinnings. It treated Southern states like children who needed their parents' permission before going to the movies.
OPINION
By ALLAN POWELL | June 28, 2013
One can have but deep sympathy for the commissioners of the CFTC (Commodity Futures Trading Commission). They have a vital interest in what comes out as the final version of the Dodd-Frank law regulating our powerful financial industry. Ezra Klein is one of the few writers who is able and willing to keep the public informed about the ongoing events in the life of this momentous piece of legislation. In his April 13 Washington Post report, he deals with the prospect of breaking up our biggest investment banks because of their risk to overall financial stability.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthew@herald-mail.com | June 27, 2013
The Berkeley County Council voted 4-1 Thursday to approve the county sheriff's three-year plan to close the gap between deputies' pay and the salaries of Martinsburg Police Department officers. County Councilman Douglas E. Copenhaver Jr. voted against the proposal, which will cost $160,000 to $200,000 for the first year of the plan, but insisted he wasn't against providing deputies with a more competitive wage. An entry-level county deputy currently is paid $30,548, which Sheriff Kenneth Lemaster Jr. told council members hasn't changed since 2006 and is about $9,000 less than an entry-level Martinsburg police officer.
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