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Landing Gear

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NEWS
July 24, 2009
Firefighters assigned to the 167th Airlift Wing in Martinsburg, W.Va., extinguish a fire in the landing gear of a simulated aircraft Wednesday during a training exercise. The West Virginia State Fire Academy provided the training for firefighters to become certified in aircraft firefighting, which is an annual requirement.
NEWS
April 12, 2009
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. -- A 14-passenger plane slid off the Chambersburg Airport runway on Sunday afternoon after its landing gear didn't lock into place. No injuries or fires resulted, Franklin (Pa.) Fire Chief Mark Trace said. "The damage to the plane (looked) minimal to me," Trace said. The pilot was alone in the airplane when an electrical problem occurred, Trace said. The problem forced the pilot to land the plane manually, but the landing gear folded up as the plane went down the runway at about 3:30 p.m., he said.
NEWS
September 19, 2002
From staff and wire reports MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - A local aircraft company could add dozens of jobs by the beginning of next year as a result of a production certificate from the Federal Aviation Administration - the first such certificate granted in West Virginia. Tiger Aircraft, which produces four-seater, single-engine planes, employs 65 people. That could increase to more than 100 by next year, said Tiger Human Resources Director Randy Emery. Hiring will begin soon, Emery said.
NEWS
April 26, 1997
By BRENDAN KIRBY Staff Writer WILLIAMSPORT - Maryland State Police "Trooper 3" swooped down on Williamsport High School Saturday afternoon, punctuating a presentation of the dos and don'ts of helicopter rescue missions. Trooper Donnie Lehman, a Maryland State Police medic, delivered a slide show to about 25 people. His talk ranged from how rescue workers on the ground can assist helicopter pilots to how rescuers should decide whether to call for a chopper in the first place.
NEWS
By GREG SIMMONS | July 23, 1999
Thurman "T.S. " Alphin, a pilot who has logged more than 7,000 hours in the air, knows how quickly a plane can spiral out of control. Alphin was up in a plane with a friend and had just handed over the controls to his companion when the plane went into a spin. With only a few seconds to react, his friend regained control of the plane 50 feet above the ground, said Alphin, a retired aircraft mechanic. Other Washington County pilots, like Alphin, have had experiences that convinced them that flying is a serious business.
NEWS
August 5, 1998
BY DON AINES / Staff Writer, Chambersburg WAYNESBORO, Pa. - The pilot of an ultralight suffered minor injuries Tuesday evening when it crashed in a soybean field in Washington Township, Pa. "I've had better days," Landis Whitsel said after the engine of his home-built aircraft conked out at about 1,000 feet. "The soybeans tangled the landing gear and caused it to flip nose-over," said Whitsel, 49, from his home at 7286 Mentzer Gap Road, Waynesboro. The artist said he suffered some abrasions in the crash, but refused treatment at the scene.
NEWS
March 26, 2003
Student pilot survives rough landing at airport A student pilot taking his Federal Aviation Administration flying test Tuesday afternoon ran into a problem when the nose landing gear of his twin engine Piper Seneca collapsed as he came in for a landing at the Hagerstown Regional Airport and the plane skidded about 1,000 feet. Damage to the plane was heavy but neither the pilot nor his passenger - an FAA examiner - was hurt, said Phil Ridenour, chief of the airport fire department.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | December 30, 2010
At a time when divorce seems as common as marriages, Lorraine and Gerald “Manny” Ebersole are living proof that couples can stay together. About 50 of the Washington County couple’s family members gathered at Nick’s Airport Inn near Hagerstown Thursday afternoon to celebrate a major anniversary milestone. Fifty years of marriage, you might have guessed? Higher. Sixty years? More. It has been 70 years since the two teenagers tied the knot on a Christmas night in a church at Antietam and Mulberry Streets in Hagerstown.
NEWS
December 23, 2009
KINGSTON, Jamaica (AP) -- An American Airlines flight carrying 154 people skidded across a Jamaican runway in heavy rain, bouncing across the tarmac and injuring more than 40 people before it stopped just short of the Caribbean Sea, officials and witnesses said. Panicked passengers screamed and baggage burst from overhead bins as Flight 331 from Miami careened down the runway in the capital, Kingston, on Tuesday night, one passenger said. The impact cracked the fuselage, crushed the left landing gear and separated both engines from the Boeing 737-800, airline spokesman Tim Smith said.
NEWS
January 16, 2008
Week of Jan. 13, 1958 · It cost $254 to educate the average pupil in Washington County's schools during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1956, the latest report of the Maryland Department of Education reveals. Not quite half of the money for current expenses in the Washington County school system came from the county. Most of the remainder came from the state, and about 5 percent of the total was derived from federal funds. Washington County was under the state average in the amount of money spent for current expenses per pupil.
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NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | December 30, 2010
At a time when divorce seems as common as marriages, Lorraine and Gerald “Manny” Ebersole are living proof that couples can stay together. About 50 of the Washington County couple’s family members gathered at Nick’s Airport Inn near Hagerstown Thursday afternoon to celebrate a major anniversary milestone. Fifty years of marriage, you might have guessed? Higher. Sixty years? More. It has been 70 years since the two teenagers tied the knot on a Christmas night in a church at Antietam and Mulberry Streets in Hagerstown.
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NEWS
December 23, 2009
KINGSTON, Jamaica (AP) -- An American Airlines flight carrying 154 people skidded across a Jamaican runway in heavy rain, bouncing across the tarmac and injuring more than 40 people before it stopped just short of the Caribbean Sea, officials and witnesses said. Panicked passengers screamed and baggage burst from overhead bins as Flight 331 from Miami careened down the runway in the capital, Kingston, on Tuesday night, one passenger said. The impact cracked the fuselage, crushed the left landing gear and separated both engines from the Boeing 737-800, airline spokesman Tim Smith said.
NEWS
July 24, 2009
Firefighters assigned to the 167th Airlift Wing in Martinsburg, W.Va., extinguish a fire in the landing gear of a simulated aircraft Wednesday during a training exercise. The West Virginia State Fire Academy provided the training for firefighters to become certified in aircraft firefighting, which is an annual requirement.
NEWS
April 12, 2009
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. -- A 14-passenger plane slid off the Chambersburg Airport runway on Sunday afternoon after its landing gear didn't lock into place. No injuries or fires resulted, Franklin (Pa.) Fire Chief Mark Trace said. "The damage to the plane (looked) minimal to me," Trace said. The pilot was alone in the airplane when an electrical problem occurred, Trace said. The problem forced the pilot to land the plane manually, but the landing gear folded up as the plane went down the runway at about 3:30 p.m., he said.
NEWS
January 16, 2008
Week of Jan. 13, 1958 · It cost $254 to educate the average pupil in Washington County's schools during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1956, the latest report of the Maryland Department of Education reveals. Not quite half of the money for current expenses in the Washington County school system came from the county. Most of the remainder came from the state, and about 5 percent of the total was derived from federal funds. Washington County was under the state average in the amount of money spent for current expenses per pupil.
NEWS
March 26, 2003
Student pilot survives rough landing at airport A student pilot taking his Federal Aviation Administration flying test Tuesday afternoon ran into a problem when the nose landing gear of his twin engine Piper Seneca collapsed as he came in for a landing at the Hagerstown Regional Airport and the plane skidded about 1,000 feet. Damage to the plane was heavy but neither the pilot nor his passenger - an FAA examiner - was hurt, said Phil Ridenour, chief of the airport fire department.
NEWS
September 19, 2002
From staff and wire reports MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - A local aircraft company could add dozens of jobs by the beginning of next year as a result of a production certificate from the Federal Aviation Administration - the first such certificate granted in West Virginia. Tiger Aircraft, which produces four-seater, single-engine planes, employs 65 people. That could increase to more than 100 by next year, said Tiger Human Resources Director Randy Emery. Hiring will begin soon, Emery said.
NEWS
By GREG SIMMONS | July 23, 1999
Thurman "T.S. " Alphin, a pilot who has logged more than 7,000 hours in the air, knows how quickly a plane can spiral out of control. Alphin was up in a plane with a friend and had just handed over the controls to his companion when the plane went into a spin. With only a few seconds to react, his friend regained control of the plane 50 feet above the ground, said Alphin, a retired aircraft mechanic. Other Washington County pilots, like Alphin, have had experiences that convinced them that flying is a serious business.
NEWS
August 5, 1998
BY DON AINES / Staff Writer, Chambersburg WAYNESBORO, Pa. - The pilot of an ultralight suffered minor injuries Tuesday evening when it crashed in a soybean field in Washington Township, Pa. "I've had better days," Landis Whitsel said after the engine of his home-built aircraft conked out at about 1,000 feet. "The soybeans tangled the landing gear and caused it to flip nose-over," said Whitsel, 49, from his home at 7286 Mentzer Gap Road, Waynesboro. The artist said he suffered some abrasions in the crash, but refused treatment at the scene.
NEWS
July 6, 1997
By DAVE McMILLION Staff Writer MARTINSBURG, W.Va. Sino Swearingen Aircraft Co. hasn't built a single airplane yet in Martinsburg but business is already rolling. Company officials said they have already received orders for the company's new SJ30-2 business jet that will be built at the Eastern West Virginia Regional Airport just south of Martinsburg. Chester Schickley, vice-president of marketing and sales for Sino Swearingen, said the company has reached about three-quarters of its goal of selling 100 of the jets by the end of the year.
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