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Landfill

OPINION
May 30, 2012
Not counting arson, there are three ways to dispose of unwanted possessions: The landfill route, the charity route and the yard sale route. The relative cost/benefit analysis of the three is fairly straightforward. The landfill is the least complicated, but most expensive. I have been to the landfill, and I can say with confidence that the men and women who work there do not judge. You will get no disapproving stares as you dispose of unfortunate decorating choices of the past 30 years, the pink flamingos of life, to which we all occasionally succumb.
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LIFESTYLE
May 10, 2012
The Cub Scouts of Pack 108 from the Old Forge area took a tour of the Washington County Landfill on April 21.
OPINION
April 26, 2012
People need to speak up about recycling fees To the editor: I find it appalling that leaders of this county would consider such fees for recycling. In response to Commissioner Callaham's comments, I assume she favors fleecing county residents? Perhaps one term as a commissioner is enough for her. Our economy is still unsteady at best. Many people are barely getting by, gas prices are at record highs, electricity rates are out of control and taxes continue in no direction but up. User fees to recycle is absolutely absurd.
LIFESTYLE
March 6, 2012
The Washington County Forty West Landfill now accepts used and unused cooking oils from county residents for recycling. Commercial oils will not be accepted from restaurants or other businesses. Cooking oils may be brought to the recycling area during normal facility hours, and placed into the designated tank adjacent to the recycle lot attendant building. Any type of liquid vegetable oil may be accepted for recycling such as peanut, corn, canola, olive and safflower. Animal fats and grease will not be accepted.
OPINION
February 13, 2012
“Way to go, Mr. Murray and your county commissioners. Punish recyclers with fees and/or inconvenience. Reward those who have no problem loading up the landfill with valuable resources. Are you saving our tax dollars for the next cell in the landfill? Or maybe to continue funding the 'airport'? What do we stand up for in this county? I believe I smell garbage.” - Washington County “Today's Smithsburg caller assumes that our local officials never met with officials from Frederick.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | heather.keels@herald-mail.com | January 30, 2012
Washington County is cutting back operating hours at its four landfill transfer stations to help reduce operating costs in the county's Solid Waste Department, county spokeswoman Sarah Lankford Sprecher said. Starting Feb. 13, the transfer stations at Dargan, Greensburg, Hancock and Kaetzel will be closed on Mondays and will be open from 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. The stations already are closed on Sundays. The current hours vary, but the change will mean most stations will be open at least 30 fewer minutes per day. The landfill transfer stations are staffed drop-off points for trash and recyclables from county residents.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | heather.keels@herald-mail.com | January 9, 2012
The City of Hagerstown's decision to send its trash to a landfill in Pennsylvania will cost Washington County's landfill about 10 percent of its tipping fee income, according to a county spokeswoman. In 2011, the city disposed of about 11,820 tons of residential waste at the county-owned Forty West Landfill, paying $603,026 in tipping fees, county spokeswoman Sarah Lankford Sprecher said. But on Jan. 1, the city switched to a new trash-collection contractor, Waste Management of Pennsylvania, which takes the garbage to Mountainview Landfill in Upton, Pa. “It is the prerogative of the city to do what they feel is in their best interest,” Sprecher said.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | heather.keels@herald-mail.com | January 7, 2012
Testing of discolored water seeping from the ground in the area of Washington County's Old City/County Landfill into Conococheague Creek revealed an arsenic level almost double that of the Environmental Protection Agency's standard for drinking water, a Maryland Department of the Environment spokesman said. At MDE's request, Washington County has hired a contractor to investigate the issue and develop a remedial action plan, MDE spokesman Jay Apperson said. An Aug. 3 sample of the seep area was found to have 17 parts per billion of arsenic, Apperson said.
NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com | December 14, 2011
At noon today, motorists will notice a new traffic signal at the intersection of U.S. 11 and Swamp Fox Road (Pa. 914). Greg Cook, chairman of the Guilford Township Supervisors, said initially that the light will flash amber to slow traffic. But, on Wednesday, the signal will begin to operate normally. With Waste Management's planned expansion of its landfill near Upton, Pa., Waste Management spokeswoman Cheryl Shields said the signal provides a safer route for trucks hauling waste from Interstate 81 north to the landfill.
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