Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsLandfill
IN THE NEWS

Landfill

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
by Joe Crocetta | November 10, 2005
Crews work Wednesday on a new cell at Mountain View Reclamation landfill in Upton, Pa. An application for a 77-acre expansion of the landfill will be sent to the state Department of Environmental Protection so the landfill might begin the normal three- to five -year permit process. Waste Management, owner of the landfill and 19 others in Pennsylvania, said at a news conference Wednesday it also is asking the DEP to increase the average daily tonnage limit from 1,500 to 1,800. The last expansion was in 1996, said Mountain View manager John Wardzinski.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | heather.keels@herald-mail.com | January 30, 2012
Washington County is cutting back operating hours at its four landfill transfer stations to help reduce operating costs in the county's Solid Waste Department, county spokeswoman Sarah Lankford Sprecher said. Starting Feb. 13, the transfer stations at Dargan, Greensburg, Hancock and Kaetzel will be closed on Mondays and will be open from 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. The stations already are closed on Sundays. The current hours vary, but the change will mean most stations will be open at least 30 fewer minutes per day. The landfill transfer stations are staffed drop-off points for trash and recyclables from county residents.
NEWS
April 26, 2009
WASHINGTON COUNTY -- Spring cleanup time is here and the Washington County Sheriff's Department is eager to ensure that debris being hauled to landfills isn't falling out on the roads. Saturday, several deputies conducted loose-load enforcement on U.S. 40 near the entrance to the Washington County Landfill for two hours. More than 20 violations were observed, and the drivers were stopped and cited, according to Sgt. Daniel Faith. Violations for improper loading without covering, and for not preventing the load from coming loose and detached, carry $80 fines in Maryland.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | September 22, 2010
A disabled veterans group will have to wait until spring budget discussions for consideration of its request for landfill fee waivers, the Washington County Commissioners said Tuesday. Ernie Unger of Disabled American Veterans Chapter 14 asked the commissioners to consider waiving landfill fees for those with service-connected, 100-percent disability. The group already receives several benefits from the state, including free license plates and free hunting and fishing licenses, he said.
NEWS
March 19, 1997
By STEVEN T. DENNIS Staff Writer Washington County Public Works Director Gary Rohrer told Washington County Commissioners that the Resh II landfill could run out of space before the adjacent Lund landfill is ready to operate if tonnage rises dramatically and state permits are held up. Tonnage at the landfill is now about 230 tons per day, compared to 400 tons per day before large trash haulers started taking county trash to landfills outside...
NEWS
January 21, 1997
Landfill-at-a-glance What is the issue? Revenue at the Washington County sanitary landfill has fallen because of a decrease in the amount of garbage dumped. If the amount of garbage dumped doesn't bounce back and fees aren't increased, the landfill will require nearly $5 million from the county general fund. The budget projection calls for $3.3 million in transfers from the general fund between 1998 and 2000 to help pay for capital improvements. It also calls for operating subsidies from county taxpayers beginning in 2001 and rising to $1 million a year in 2003.
NEWS
May 10, 1997
By STEVEN T. DENNIS Staff Writer Washington County Commissioner James R. Wade says a plan to spend at least $3 million to build a bridge and access road across the Conococheague Creek to the future Lund landfill is a mistake that will cost the county taxpayers money for the benefit of a few residents. Wade said he thought it would be wiser and less costly to upgrade Independence Road to access the landfill, which wouldn't require a bridge. But a 1990 agreement to appease residents who opposed the landfill, signed by then-Washington County Commissioners President Ronald L. Bowers on behalf of the commissioners, specifically forbids trash-hauling vehicles from using Independence Road.
NEWS
May 27, 1997
By STEVEN T. DENNIS Staff Writer The projected cost of a bridge and access road over the Conococheague Creek to Lund landfill is $4.34 million, about $840,000 more than it would cost to upgrade roads on the same side of the creek, according to Washington County officials. County officials, in a written response to written questions from a reporter, said county staff members estimated in 1994 that it would cost $3.5 million to upgrade Rockdale and Independence Roads instead of building a bridge to provide access to the landfill.
NEWS
April 15, 2001
Meeting set for landfill permit in Hedgesville MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - A public meeting will be held April 23 in Hedgesville, W.Va., to review the proposed renewal of a permit to allow LCS Services, Inc. of Pittsburgh, Pa., to operate the landfill in Hedgesville. The public meeting was requested by state Sen. John Unger, D-Berkeley. It will held by the state Division of Environmental Protection Office of Waste Management. Such meetings are "an excellent opportunity for citizens to discuss issues with the agency," said DEP Director Mike O. Callaghan in a release.
NEWS
August 25, 2009
SCOTLAND, Pa. -- A man was killed Tuesday morning at the Blue Ridge (IESI) Landfill in Franklin County, Pa., when he stepped out of his tractor-trailer and was run over by another tractor-trailer, Pennsylvania State Police said in a news release. Rafael Clodover Gaona, 44, of New York City parked his vehicle at the landfill to dump his load. Another driver was backing up his truck and ran over him, according to police and a release by Franklin County Coroner Jeffrey R. Connor. Gaona was temporarily living in Philadelphia, according to Connor's release.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
August 30, 2013
We tend to view projects that seem too good to be true with a raised eyebrow. But if the Washington County landfill can actually be “mined” for energy, it certainly would be a welcome use of rubbish that must otherwise be buried at high cost. America First Inc. wants to establish a public-private partnership with Washington County, a venture that would turn solid waste into alternative energy. The county's investment in the operation appears to be relatively small. It would set aside 15 acres at the landfill, which private investors would develop for the manufacturing of burnable pellets and synthetic liquid fuel.
Advertisement
NEWS
By C.J. LOVELACE | cj.lovelace@herald-mail.com | August 18, 2013
A West Virginia company has been given the initial go-ahead to begin planning a waste-to-energy operation that would be built at Washington County's Forty West Landfill west of Hagerstown. The company, America First Inc., is headed by President Kevin Whited, who went before the Washington County Board of Commissioners on Aug. 6. The board voted 4-0 to give the planning process of the public-private partnership a green light. Commissioners President Terry L. Baker abstained from the vote, saying he did not have enough information to take a position one way or the other.
OPINION
June 13, 2013
County gives $36 incentive not to recycle To the editor: I recently received my vehicle permit application from the Washington County Solid Waste Department and it is official:  The county is again offering me $36 to not recycle and instead throw my recyclables in the landfill.  Well, sort of. Because I live in an area with no garbage pickup I pay $130 for a permit to take my garbage to the landfill.   Beginning last year...
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | April 30, 2013
People touring a new facility that converts methane gas into electricity might have been turned off by the dreary weather Tuesday morning, but the microbes making the needed methane loved it. The microbes converting decaying landfill trash into methane function best in moist environments, PPL Renewable Energy President Mike Kroboth explained. The methane they make is now being used to power homes and businesses in the Borough of Chambersburg. A four-mile “extension cord” carries electricity generated at the IESI Blue Ridge Landfill in Greene Township, Pa., to the nearby borough.
BREAKINGNEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | October 28, 2012
A section of the LCS Services Landfill that caught fire Sunday morning involved a pile of trash about 8 feet tall that had not been covered with dirt, according to a Hedgesville Volunteer Fire Co. spokesman. Typically at the landfill along Allensville Road, trash is dumped at the facility, then a layer of dirt is spread over the debris, Lt. Bradley Crowell said. Landfill workers repeat the process until a section reaches a certain height, then they move to a different section, Crowell said.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | September 5, 2012
A recent Republican campaign piece in a congressional race focuses on a connection between Democrat John Delaney and a formerly illegal landfill. National Waste Services operated the Battle Creek Landfill in Page County, Va., until 2004, when the landfill was shut down after taking in more trash than the state allowed. Republicans are linking Delaney - who is challenging Republican incumbent Roscoe G. Bartlett in the 6th District - and National Waste Services. The front of a Maryland Republican Party mailing says: “John Delaney financed a landfill that regulators shut down for damaging the environment.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthew.umstead@herald-mail.com | August 30, 2012
The old Berkeley County landfill near Martinsburg, which has been closed since the fall of 1991, is being eyed as a potential site for a solar energy farm, Berkeley County Solid Waste Authority's board chairman told Berkeley County Council members Thursday. Clint Hogbin said he is exploring the possibility of installing solar panels at the 24-acre landfill off Grapevine Road on behalf of the Solid Waste Authority board. While his investigation is in the “very early stages,” Hogbin told council members that a south-facing area of the landfill appears to be a very suitable location for a solar farm.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthew.umstead@herald-mail.com | June 26, 2012
A company that wants to sort and biologically treat garbage in Berkeley County to create a “solid refuse fuel” has applied for state certification. Entsorga West Virginia LLC filed a “certificate of need” application with the West Virginia Public Service Commission on June 13, according to the state regulatory agency's online case docket. The company is proposing to build a $19 million resource recovery facility on 4 acres of the Berkeley County Solid Waste Authority's old landfill property off Grapevine Road, according to the application.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | June 19, 2012
A proposed solar project will generate $515,000 for Washington County when it is completed and about $12.9 million over 25 years,  according to County Administrator Gregory B. Murray. The Washington County Board of Commissioners agreed on Tuesday to the power purchase and lease agreements with EPG Solar. The county plans to lease up to 130 acres at its Forty West and Resh Road landfills for EPG's 25-megawatt solar development. The EPG Solar project and a separate 20-megawatt solar farm under construction south of Hagerstown would contribute a large percentage of the solar power Maryland needs to meet renewable-energy benchmarks, EPG Solar owner Robert Babcock told county officials.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|