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Korean War

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OPINION
June 26, 2013
The Korean War, and the political undercurrents that accompanied it, too often are forgotten. In the 1950s, the Western world feared the “domino effect,” the idea that one nation after another would turn to communism. In hindsight, this fear might have been overblown. Communism, for the most part, has died under its own weight. But there was no way to know that 60 years ago when we feared the Korean peninsula would fall to the communists and then bleed throughout all of Southeast Asia and eventually the world.
NEWS
June 29, 2012
On June 9, six members of Korean War Veterans Antietam Chapter 312 met with eight students from Northern Virginia high schools to talk about the Korean War and the various experiences the veterans encountered during and after the war. The gathering of students and veterans took place at the home of Vice Cmdr. Les Bishop of Hagerstown. The meeting was prompted by a student inquiry after viewing the chapter's website. All of the students are Korean-American descendants and are united in a project to write a book about the Korean War. Their interest in talking to the veterans was to hear how and why the veterans entered military service, their recollections from the war and the affect the war had on their life afterwards.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | June 26, 2012
Local Korean War veterans say they felt a sense of  urgency a few years ago when they started planning to build a monument to honor the men and women who served in that “forgotten” conflict. “The Korean War veterans are rapidly becoming an endangered species as we are losing more than 900 Korean War veterans each day,” Korean War veteran Lew Ewing said Tuesday during a groundbreaking ceremony for the monument at Mealey Parkway in Hagerstown. “If we the veterans who are still living today do not get it done now, memorials like this will never get built.” About 70 people, most of them members of Antietam Chapter 312 of the Korean War Veterans Association, gathered for the ceremony.
NEWS
By C.J. LOVELACE | cj.lovelace@herald-mail.com | May 21, 2012
A large motorcade of 12 tour buses and motorhomes rolled in to Hagerstown's Clarion Hotel and Conference Center on Monday afternoon, carrying 200 men and women who served the United States during World War II and the Korean War. Along with 100 assistants traveling with the veterans, the group left Beloit, Wis., Sunday morning and made a stop in Pittsburgh that night before arriving in Hagerstown for the second year in a row, according to Mark Finnegan,...
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | May 26, 2012
Wilbur Snyder dropped out of Hagerstown High School in the ninth grade and went to work for the railroad. On May 7, 1951, he was drafted by the U.S. Army and sent to Camp Gordon, Ga., to be a signalman. But when he was sent to Korea later that year, his military occupational specialty changed. “They handed me an M-1 (rifle) and said you're an infantryman,” the 82-year-old Snyder said recently at his Funkstown home. “I had to get on-the-job training.” The Korean War had been raging for about nine months before Snyder arrived at Pusan in March 1951.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | May 28, 2011
Editor's note: On June 25, 1950, communist forces of North Korea attacked South Korea to begin the Korean War. Early in the fighting, South Korean defenses were pushed back to a small pocket of resistance on the southeast coast of the country until United Nations forces, led by U.S. troops, mounted a successful counterattack at Inchon in September 1950. The war lasted until July 27, 1953, when both sides agreed to end hostilities. The country remains divided today. The U.S. Department of Defense estimates that 36,574 Americans were killed during the conflict.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | July 16, 2013
Lee Blevins held a letter Monday that had remained sealed since his mother wrote it 63 years ago. The intended recipient was his brother, Heren, who was captured in 1950 while serving in the U.S. Army during the first year of the Korean War. Blevins said he had no idea what the letter would say as he opened the envelope, marked on the outside with a raspberry colored return-to-sender stamp that read, “Verified Missing in Action.” ...
NEWS
By JANET HEIM | janeth@herald-mail.com | February 23, 2012
The recognition was 60 years in coming, but the Marine receiving it was no less proud. Still trim and fit in the U.S. Marine Corpsuniform he had custom-made in Okinawa in 1966 on his way to Vietnam, retired Capt. Robert “Bob” Glausier, 80, proudly wears the Gold Star he finally received for combat action in the Korean War. It is the second combat action award he has received. Still, Glausier is hesitant to make much of his latest recognition. “Bob is awfully modest.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | May 25, 2013
In 1953, the Korean War had been raging for three years when thousands of North Korean prisoners of war were set free below the 38th Parallel at Pusan. Hagerstown resident Ed Peters, 81, said he was a military policeman serving in Korea at the time as he watched the enemy soldiers mix with the local population. “They brought hundreds of (boats) into Pusan and released those guys in the streets,” Peters said. “Letting those prisoners go free in Pusan created some headaches for the local police ... They were running around and no one knew who was who.” According to documents from the time, the prisoners were released in June 1953 because many of them said they were anti-Communist and wouldn't return to fight for North Korea.
NEWS
May 16, 1999
By BRUCE HAMILTON / Staff Writer photo: KEVIN G. GILBERT / staff photographer Ernest Richard Rider walked into St. Josephs Catholic Church carrying a personal history in a brown paper bag. [cont. from front page ] He slowly removed old papers and mementos, emptying the bag's contents onto a table in the parish hall. He dug a handful of metal from the bottom, setting down his dog tags and shrapnel. "That piece was hot when I picked it up," he said, pointing to a jagged shard that landed in his bunker.
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OBITUARIES
September 5, 2013
Leroy Carson Cauffman, 83, of Hagerstown, Md., passed away Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2013, at Meritus Medical Center near Hagerstown, with his loving wife of 58 years and his son by his side. Born June 24, 1930, in Hagerstown, he was the son and the last surviving child of the late Arthur Cleveland and Jennie Elizabeth Nagle Cauffman. He served as a staff sergeant in the U.S. Army during the Korean War. He was of the Protestant faith. He retired from Western Maryland/Chessie System Railroad after 29 years.
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NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | August 22, 2013
The remains of U.S. Army private from Hagerstown who died of malnutrition as a prisoner of war during the Korean War are scheduled to be returned home this weekend and buried in Rest Haven Cemetery on Tuesday afternoon, officials said. Heren Blevins was wounded in the arm and taken prisoner in the Chosin Reservoir on Dec. 2, 1950, when elements of the 7th Infantry Division were overrun by Chinese communists. The 19-year-old soldier was taken to a prison camp that the captives dubbed “Death Valley.” Some of his fellow prisoners of war who were repatriated after the war told military officials that Blevins died of malnutrition in January 1951.
OBITUARIES
By JANET HEIM | janeth@herald-mail.com | August 17, 2013
There are few places Wayne Winebrenner could go where he didn't run into people he knew. Whether close to home or on the road to places such as Myrtle Beach, S.C., or at an Orioles game in Baltimore, his family said he always was bumping into acquaintances. Wayne's life was characterized by his commitment to community - whether as a U.S. Marine serving in the Korean War, working his way up the ranks of the Maryland correctional system, as town manager for several small towns, or coordinating community projects through church and the many organizations with which he was involved.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | August 6, 2013
Pvt. Heren Blevins met the beginning of his end on Dec. 2, 1950, when the former Hagerstown resident was captured at the Chosin Reservoir during the Korean War. Military records indicate Blevins was wounded in the arm and taken prisoner when elements of the 7th Infantry Division were overrun by Chinese communists. The 19-year-old soldier was taken to a prison camp that the captives dubbed “Death Valley.” Some of his fellow prisoners of war who were repatriated after the war told military officials that Blevins died of malnutrition in January 1951.
NEWS
July 30, 2013
Antietam Chapter 312 of the Korean War Veterans Association elected its new officers for the 2013-14 year at its annual meeting July 3. The new officers are Les Bishop, commander; Pat Patterson, vice commander; Ron Twenty, second vice commander; Charlie Morris, secretary; and Jim Mobley, treasurer. The following members were appointed to fill the other officer positions in the chapter: Carl Paylor, judge advocate; Dick Sayles, sergeant-at-arms; Dr. Bud Johns, chaplain; and Clayton Burkholder, historian.
EDUCATION
July 28, 2013
Antietam Chapter 312 of the Korean War Veterans Association awarded two $500 scholarships to local students. The awards were given at the chapter's annual meeting July 3. This year's winners were Natalie Rudisill of Williamsport High School and Sean G. Kreps of Clear Spring High School. Rudisill will attend University of Maryland, Baltimore County and major in engineering. Kreps plans to attend West Chester University and major in premed-anesthesiology. The awards were made by scholarship chairman Joe Startari and Commander Les Bishop.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | July 21, 2013
Maryland Veterans Affairs Secretary Edward Chow told several local Korean War veterans on Sunday that they “would never be forgotten.” The Korean War, whose ceasefire 60 years ago is being commemorated through various events, has often been referred to as the “Forgotten War.” Korean War veterans have been using the anniversary events to educate the public about the war, said Les Bishop, commander of Antietam Chapter 312 of the Korean War...
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | July 16, 2013
Lee Blevins held a letter Monday that had remained sealed since his mother wrote it 63 years ago. The intended recipient was his brother, Heren, who was captured in 1950 while serving in the U.S. Army during the first year of the Korean War. Blevins said he had no idea what the letter would say as he opened the envelope, marked on the outside with a raspberry colored return-to-sender stamp that read, “Verified Missing in Action.” ...
OBITUARIES
July 13, 2013
Wilfred (Billy) Odell Saunders, 79, of Sarasota, Fla., and formerly of Hagerstown, Md., died Monday, July 8, 2013. He was a United States Marine and served in the Korean War. He was a beloved husband, father and grandfather. He was the husband of Charlene M. Saunders of Sarasota; and former wife, Harriet A. Saunders, of Sarasota, with whom he remained very close. He is survived by his brother, Joe Saunders of Hagerstown; brother, Mark (Merdy) Saunders of Fort Lauderdale, Fla.; sister, Joyce (Sis)
OBITUARIES
June 27, 2013
Allan Edwin Sankey, 82, of Falling Waters, W.Va., passed away peacefully Wednesday, June 26, 2013, at Heartland of Martinsburg (W.Va.). Born July 29, 1930, in Pittsburgh, Pa., he was the son of the late Edward E. Sankey and Eleanor D. Shell Sankey. Allan attended school in Pittsburgh. He served our country in the U.S. Army from 1948 to 1960 in the Korean War in communications. He enjoyed roller dancing, sports car racing and boating, and was a HAM radio enthusiast. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his wife, Roberta A. Gardner.
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