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Jonathan Hager

NEWS
By LAURA ERNDE | December 30, 1998
Over the objections of local historians, the owners of a 1774 farmhouse filed for a demolition permit Monday. "Finally the time has run out. We will be moving forward with it as quickly as possible," said Merle Elliott, president of the Hagerstown/Washington County Industrial Foundation Inc., known as CHIEF. CHIEF owns the two-story limestone house built by Johan Ludwig Kemmerer. The house is on a half-acre in the Airport Business Park. Members of the Washington County Historical Society and the Middleburg/Mason-Dixon Line Area Historical Society had mounted a campaign to save the house.
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NEWS
by LAURA ERNDE | October 21, 2002
laurae@herald-mail.com A gift of a donkey turned into a cultural learning experience for both Germans and Americans on Friday at the 50th anniversary celebration of the Sister City Affiliation between Hagerstown and Wesel, Germany. The donkey, the Germans explained, has become the unofficial symbol of Wesel because of an old German proverb. Loosely translated, the proverb says that if you shout "Wesel" at the mountains, the echo will sound back, "Esel," which is the German word for donkey.
NEWS
Linda Irvin-Craig | April 27, 2012
The society also lost its president of six years when Edward Tenney died in 1942. The previous president, Harvey Bomberger, had served for 25 years. The group was accustomed to great continuity. Mary Vernon Mish lived on the West Virginia shore of the Potomac River across from Williamsport. She was so involved in historic preservation on both sides of the river, in Berkeley County, W.Va., and Washington County, that she was the apparent choice to succeed Tenney. Interestingly, Mish was the first and only woman to serve as president of WCHS.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | April 25, 2004
andrews@herald-mail.com WASHINGTON COUNTY - Pretend that, through the miracle of cloning or cryonics or some such, Jonathan Hager were to return from the 18th century to modern-day Hagerstown ? the city he founded in the heart of Washington County, in Western Maryland. If Hager were back, death no longer would be a certainty ? but at least four levels of taxation would. The following fanciful, hypothetical narrative illustrates the new and increased taxes and fees Hager might face this year at three of those levels ?
NEWS
by JOHN SCHNEBLY | July 16, 2006
If I were a king, or Tom Delay, I would redraw the boundaries of the City of Hagerstown. In case you haven't noticed, the city now sprawls and meanders from points north near the airport all the way down south to the Potomac River. Shame on old Jonathan Hager for not having the sense to make the city boundary big enough to reflect the physical reality of 21st century Washington County. He just wasn't a visionary. As we all know, time and history conspire to demand changes in the way we live and function.
NEWS
December 31, 1999
Editor's note: After consulting with local historians, we've chosen 10 events that shaped Washington County over the last hundred years. The list is not intended to be comprehensive. Its aim is to tell the story of the county over the 20th century. Top 10 events in Washington County during the 20th century: 1. City Park purchased (1915) 2. Flu epidemic of 1918 3. Hagerstown Fairgrounds peaked (1910s and 1920s) 4. Flood of 1936 5. World War II 6. Interstate highways built (1958 through 1968)
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | October 5, 2005
julieg@herald-mail.com Halloween isn't for another 29 days, but people can get spooked all month if they know where to go. Here are some of the haunted houses, trails, hayrides and ghost tours available in the Tri-State area this haunted season. Washington County Haunted Hager House tours tell of true stories of things that happened within the walls of the home of Hagers-town's founder, Jonathan Hager, that are unexplained, said John Nelson, historical sites faciilitator for the City of Hagerstown.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | October 5, 2006
Whether it's houses, cornfields, factories or hayride routes, the ghosts don't appear to be picky about location. Tri-State area residents have plenty of opportunities to see how far their stomach will drop this spooky season thanks to a variety of haunted happenings. Washington County KOA Kampground added four animated props to its Creekside Manor Haunted House, so there are 13 animated props from The ScareFactory in Ohio. The house, which takes about 15 minutes to tour, is appropriate for ages 12 and older.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | October 3, 2009
There's a chill in the air, but is it just the autumn weather? Or is there a ghost lurking nearby? Walking tours of "haunted" towns, haunted corn mazes and a haunted theater are just a few of the haunted happenings in the Tri-State area this season. But some ghostly sightings won't be seen this year. There will be no Fright-Night in Chambersburg, Pa., this season, according to www.fright-nights.com. It will return in 2010. There's also no Terror Behind Bars at the former Franklin County (Pa.)
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | October 6, 2008
It seems like it was just summer and already the ghosts are jumpin' in the Tri-State area with several haunted activities under way and more beginning soon. New this year is Terror Behind Bars in Chambersburg, Pa. The fundraiser uses the former Franklin County Prison, zombies and riots to scare up money for two charities. Here's more information about haunted happenings in the Tri-State area. Washington County Ghost walk Fort Frederick Ghost Walk at Fort Frederick State Park on Md. 56 near Big Pool (Exit 12 off Interstate 70)
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