Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsJohn Mccain
IN THE NEWS

John Mccain

NEWS
April 22, 2008
Pennsylvania voters leaving the polls on Tuesday said various reasons had brought them there: "I vote all the time. I think it's a privilege. " - Mary Hess King, Antrim Township Tom Zeger, 80, of Greencastle, said he's been voting as long as he can remember. Zeger, a John McCain supporter, has been keeping an eye on the presidential race. "I believe that every citizen should vote, and I was interested in seeing (33rd District Senate candidate) Jim Taylor elected. " - Dave Thrush, Antrim Township Jack Reese, of Waynesboro, celebrated his 79th birthday at the Fairview Brethren in Christ Church polls.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 4, 2008
"When I was growing up, back in the 1950s and '60s, we had hurricanes in that time, too, but gasoline never jumped up like it does now every time there's a hurricane. Could someone please explain this?" -- Hagerstown "You have to love this, which I received in an e-mail. John Edwards was not permitted to speak at the Democratic convention because he admitted to having an affair. Bill Clinton did speak at the convention. " -- Greencastle, Pa. "It should be obvious by now to everyone in the world that the two people best qualified to be president are Sen. McCain and Gov. Palin.
NEWS
By ERIN CUNNINGHAM | October 20, 2008
WASHINGTON COUNTY -- Campaign signs for GOP presidential nominee John McCain and his Democratic rival Barack Obama have been stolen, burned and "slashed to bits. " In a tense political season, the ugliness of the campaign trail has been evident in vandalized signs seen in Hagerstown. Signs for McCain in at least two locations were defaced by the word "No" spray-painted in orange. Some have taken measures to protect their signs. A sign for the Republican nominee on Summit Avenue warns that a camera is fixed on the sign and that vandals will be seen.
NEWS
July 19, 2008
"Well, I don't think riding in a fighter plane and getting shot down is a qualification to be president. " That was retired Gen. Wesley Clark's condescending assessment of John McCain's military service. Clark's words have great weight because he was speaking as a key political/military advisor to Barack Obama. If Gen. Clark had been talking about me, his remarks might be true. After all, I rode in a fighter plane and got shot down over North Vietnam. In no way do Clark's words apply to McCain.
NEWS
By MIKKEL WALLECH / For The Herald-Mail | November 6, 2008
Tuesday's presidential election ended in a landslide victory for Barack Obama. Local students interviewed Wednesday agreed Obama's election is a historic event that will bring change to the nation, but did not agree on whether it is the change America needs. Colleen Ayers, 24, of Chambersburg, Pa., said she was unsure whether Obama can live up to expectations. "Obama's victory represents a change for our country; it's a moment in history that this nation, and the world for that matter, will never forget," said Ayers, a freshman at Hagerstown Community College.
NEWS
By ERIN CUNNINGHAM | October 15, 2008
HAGERSTOWN -- Former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. said it was relatively easy to support John McCain after Ehrlich's pick in the Republican presidential primary, Rudy Giuliani, was defeated. "With John McCain, you really get what you see on TV," Ehrlich told a crowd Tuesday at Duffy's on Potomac in Hagerstown. "He is a relentless worker. When he is on your side, you love him, and when he's against you, you hate him. He's relentless in his pursuit of what he thinks is good policy for the United States of America.
NEWS
By ERIN CUNNINGHAM | October 30, 2008
HAGERSTOWN -- The line of Republican leaders comparing Barack Obama's economic policies to socialism grew longer Wednesday as Del. Christopher B. Shank, R-Washington, echoed that claim. Hagerstown City Councilman Lewis C. Metzner countered Shank's remark by reading the definition of socialism and saying that the recent federal bailout of financial institutions in the United States is actually similar to socialist ideals. Local political leaders argued on behalf of their presidential candidate of choice Wednesday during a forum at Hagerstown Community College, taking sides on everything from the war in Iraq to health care.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | April 3, 2008
ANNAPOLIS -- While Republicans crammed inside an Annapolis restaurant, anticipating U.S. Sen. John McCain, their party's presumptive presidential nominee, a lone Democrat hovered outside, around back. It was Del. John P. Donoghue, D-Washington, drawn to the event through family ties rather than through political allegiance. He and Sen. Donald F. Munson, R-Washington, stood with each other - near a media horde - behind Chick & Ruth's Delly, a few blocks from the State House.
NEWS
April 13, 2008
A more accurate name for 'cognitive dissonance' To the editor: I read in Allen Powell's article of March 1 with utmost interest. He refers to behavioral psychologists who talk about people who have the capacity to compartmentalize incongruous beliefs and simultaneously hold two sets of ideas even though they are incompatible. Psychologists describe this situation as "cognitive dissonance. " I am not so sure that we need to invent a new expression for this. In the good old days, we used to call these people hypocrites.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|