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John Brown

NEWS
August 8, 2006
Brown letter was a disservice to American history To the editor: Although, I have no intent to debate or support the National Parks or NAACP policies, I would like to set a couple of historical facts straight from the July 23 letter to the editor titled: "John Brown was not a hero, he was a terrorist. " Although I found the basic facts in that letter to be accurate, the writer is looking through distorted lenses. Let me use the foundation of United States to prove my point.
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NEWS
by DON AINES | July 15, 2006
HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. - Seventy-four years ago, W.E.B. Du Bois and members of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People were rebuffed when they traveled from their convention in Washington, D.C., to place a plaque honoring abolitionist John Brown on the grounds of Storer College, a historically black school in Harpers Ferry where Brown's 1859 raid set the stage for the Civil War. On Friday, NAACP Chairman Julian Bond led...
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | June 18, 2006
HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. - Bob O'Connor has long been fascinated by the story of infamous abolitionist John Brown and various curiosities associated with his tale. He shares many of those intriguing facts in his first book, a historical novel, "The Perfect Steel Trap: Harpers Ferry 1859. " For instance, future Abraham Lincoln assassin John Wilkes Booth - another historical figure O'Connor has had a lifetime fascination about - was at Brown's execution. Many of the curiosities or coincidences are left for the near-end of the book.
NEWS
By JOE CROCETTA / Staff Photographer | May 4, 2006
John Brown of Hagerstown holds his 13-month-old son Michael Brown, left, as daughter Megan Brown follows with a scream down the slide Wednesday night at the Downsville Ruritan carnival across from Bester Elementary School in Hagerstown.
NEWS
by HEATHER KEELS | September 22, 2005
It's as regular as the sunrise in this tiny Pleasant Valley town: Every morning at 9 a.m., down the hilly, winding road to the little white building with the blue U.S. Postal Service mailbox, comes Leon Yourtee to get his mail. If he wanted, the 90-year-old retired Army colonel could get his mail delivered to his door from Knoxville, four miles south on Md. 67 and just across the line into Frederick County, Md., but to him, and many of the town's other old-timers, the notion is unthinkable.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | September 16, 2005
charlestown@herald-mail.com CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Charles Town Mayor Peggy Smith asked the Jefferson County Commission on Thursday for permission to start offering tours of the historic Jefferson County Courthouse again. Tours of the courthouse used to be offered in the mid-1990s and were a big success, Smith said. Smith said interest in the courthouse has not waned. Now that the city has established the Charles Town Visitors Center, many tourists are coming to the center along George Street and are asking about tours of the courthouse, Smith said.
NEWS
by Tom Riford and Roy Thaler | August 5, 2005
John Brown is one of the more well-known historical names of those who have visited Washington County. The dedicated abolitionist imagined his actions would begin a slave rebellion and would help outlaw slavery. The reverberations of these local events echoed around the world. A century and a half after Brown's raid on the Federal Arsenal at Harpers Ferry, Americans have still not reached a consensus on how to characterize John Brown. But we have no doubt about his profound effect on our history.
NEWS
by HEATHER KEELS | June 20, 2005
Editor's note: Many unincorporated communities with long histories are in Washington County. This summer series spotlights those communities. Next week: Beaver Creek. heatherk@herald-mail.com It's as regular as the sunrise in this tiny Pleasant Valley town: Every morning at 9 a.m., down the hilly, winding road to the little white building with the blue U.S. Postal Service mailbox, comes Leon Yourtee to get his mail. If he wanted, the 90-year-old retired Army colonel could get his mail delivered to his door from Knoxville, four miles south on Md. 67 and just across the line into Frederick County, Md., but to him, and many of the town's other old-timers, the notion is unthinkable.
NEWS
February 11, 2004
In June of 1859, John Brown, using the alias of I. Smith, and two of his sons registered at the Washington House in downtown Hagerstown. On July 4 Brown and his sons walked to the Sandy Hook area, where they rented a farm for eight months at a cost of $35 in gold. It was here that Brown and his followers finalized plans for the raid on Harpers Ferry in October. From The Cracker Barrel
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | August 31, 2003
martinsburg@herald-mail.com Pencils out. Paper ready. This is a test in history. Probably few people can name 15 history-changing events in West Virginia's Eastern Panhandle, so short answers will be the way to go. Ready? 1. Who comprised the first group of southern troops to join Gen. George Washington in the American Revolution? 2. When and where was the first free, rural mail delivery system started? 3. What was the hometown of the first black man given a regular commission in the army, and when did he receive the honor?
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