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John Brown

NEWS
By ERIN CUNNINGHAM | July 12, 2009
SHARPSBURG -- Some historians say the Civil War began in the small Sharpsburg farmhouse where abolitionist John Brown planned his historic raid on Harpers Ferry in 1859, said Sprigg Lynn, who owns the property with his father. On Saturday and Sunday, the public was invited to tour the Kennedy Farmhouse on Chestnut Grove Road during an open house to commemorate the 150th anniversary of John Brown's stay at the home where he began planning and staging the failed raid. Dennis Frye, chief historian for Harpers Ferry National Historical Park and head of the committee overseeing the John Brown commemoration in four states, said about 300 people attended the event Saturday and another 200 were expected Sunday.
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NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | June 30, 2009
HAGERSTOWN -- Harpers Ferry, W.Va., is most commonly linked to John Brown's October 1859 raid on a federal arsenal during his failed attempt to arm an uprising of slaves. But Hagerstown played a part in the string of events, too, and that moment in history was celebrated Tuesday afternoon during an unveiling of a historical marker downtown. From Oct. 16 to 18, 1859, Brown and others took possession of an armory in Harpers Ferry. The raid drew militia companies and federal troops from Maryland, Virginia and other areas.
NEWS
June 26, 2009
Veterans Night with the Keys MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Veterans Affairs Medical Center of Martinsburg, W.Va., will partner with the Frederick Keys to present Veterans Night at Harry Grove Stadium Sunday, June 28, in Frederick. The ceremonial first pitch will be thrown by Martinsburg VAMC Director Ann Brown. "God Bless America" will be performed by retired Lt. Col. USA Tomy Wright. The game is between the Frederick Keys and the Wilmington Blue Rocks, with first pitch scheduled for 6 p.m. Gates open at 5 p.m. General admission tickets cost $5 for all military veterans and their families.
NEWS
By CRYSTAL SCHELLE | June 14, 2009
HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. -- It can be hard to convince a group of middle school students that abolitionist John Brown still has relevance today. Or better yet, have them try to convince other tweens and teens of the same thing. But Harpers Ferry Middle School has partnered with Harpers Ferry Historical National Park, The Journey Through Hallowed Ground, a nonprofit organization, and the Advisory Council on Historical Preservation, to do just that. Students at Harpers Ferry Middle School are working with Jason Hoffman, a sixth-grade math teacher and technology specialist, to produce vodcasts about the park.
NEWS
By CRYSTAL SCHELLE | March 29, 2009
With his wild white hair and beard, John Brown had the look of what some Southerners have tried to pigeon-hole him: crazy sympathizer. But local historians say either way Brown is pegged -- mad man or hero -- he has left an important mark on American history. This year, beginning in April, lessons of Brown will be relearned with special events and activities throughout 2009. The 150th commemoration kicks off Saturday, April 18, in Harpers Ferry National Historical Park in West Virginia and continue throughout the quad-state region, ending in December, the anniversary of his death.
NEWS
By CRYSTAL SCHELLE | March 29, 2009
On an overcast, drizzly day on Oct. 16, 1859, John Brown and his fully armed raiders marched into Harpers Ferry, then in Virginia, marking what some historians argue is the first step toward the American Civil War. This year marks the 150th anniversary of John Brown's Raid, and his subsequent death by hanging on Dec. 2, 1859. As a way to commemorate what transpired out of Brown's efforts, the Quad-State region has banded together for a sesquicentennial commemoration of John Brown's Raid, according to Todd Bolton, events committee chair of the Sesquicentennial Quad-State Committee.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE, Special to The Herald-Mail | March 27, 2009
HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. -- The day was about students teaching kids about history, specifically the story of abolitionist John Brown and his exploits in Harpers Ferry in 1859. The "teachers" were Harpers Ferry Middle School students. On Friday, they were making videos of their own creations of historic videos at Harpers Ferry National Historical Park. The project, taking a page from Abraham Lincoln, is called "Of the Student, By the Student, For the Student. " About 60 sixth-, seventh- and eighth-graders participated on six teams.
NEWS
February 15, 2009
The American Bus Association has named the upcoming John Brown sesquicentennial commemoration a Top 100 Event for 2009. Events on the list were chosen from hundreds of celebrations, festivals, fairs and commemorative events that were nominated by state tourism offices and local or regional convention and visitors bureaus. The sesquicentennial commemorates John Brown's raid on the U.S. arsenal at Harpers Ferry, W.Va., in 1859. Events celebrating the sesquicentennial begin in April and continue through mid-December.
NEWS
By SIDNEY LITTLE / Pulse Correspondent | June 10, 2008
"The Night I Saved John Brown" is an adventurous, realistic fiction story of a 13-year-old boy, Josh Connors. It's set in Harpers Ferry, W.Va. Josh, the main character, lives in a redneck family. Josh has two older brothers and a new friend, Luke Richmond. His father is a grouchy, unpleasant jerk, but Josh's mother is sweet and caring. She does what she can to protect her youngest child, Josh, from his fearsome father. In the book, Josh goes through many adventures with his friend Luke.
NEWS
August 30, 2006
Gordon Lynn is all about ethics To the editor: In a society that preaches "innocent until proven guilty," but is handicapped by our media circus that creates "guilty until proven innocent," we need a fair and just state's attorney who will fight for a fair trial. God forbid that anyone be unjustly accused of a crime, because an open-minded jury trial today would be difficult, if not impossible, after the media has attacked and accused. A vote for Gordon Lynn will ensure that our basic constitutional rights are adhered to, no matter which side of the courtroom he is on. That is what "ethics" is about.
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