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John Brown

NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | October 15, 2009
BOLIVAR, W.Va. -- Working under a canopy of umbrellas Thursday afternoon, West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin cut a ribbon officially opening the new headquarters for the Jefferson County Convention and Visitors Bureau off U.S. 340. More significant is the fact that after years of operating out of a small trailer, which bureau and local officials said was a West Virginia eyesore, the agency moved next door into a spacious, two-story, modern cedar-frame chalet....
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NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | October 15, 2009
ยท Highlights of John Brown 150th Commemoration HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. - Delfeayo Marsalis' family obviously has a strong musical background. His father is legendary jazz pianist Ellis Marsalis and two of his brothers, Wynton and Branford, are well-known musicians. "My family believes strongly in history," as well as education, Delfeayo Marsalis said during a recent phone interview. So, for Marsalis, it's an honor to be invited to participate in this weekend's John Brown 150th Commemoration at Harpers Ferry National Historical Park.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | October 15, 2009
CHARLES TOWN, W.VA. -- After four years of research and writing, the author of a new book on John Brown said he reached the conclusion that the fiery abolitionist's trial was the most important in the history of the country. Brian McGinty, lecturing Thursday night to an audience of more than 200 in the Jefferson County Courthouse, the same courthouse where Brown was tried, convicted and sentenced to hang 150 years ago this week, said the trial was the first to generate mass media attention.
NEWS
By TIM ROWLAND | October 10, 2009
South Lynn has called the Kennedy Farm in southern Washington County the best-kept secret in Maryland. Whether or not that's true today, it was certainly true 150 years ago. John Brown wanted it that way. When Brown's daughter, Annie, would do the dishes, she situated herself by a window with a view of the lane, where her job was more sentry than sanitary worker. Should any visitor come whistling up the path, she'd give the high sign and 20 or so men would scurry up to the attic.
NEWS
By ED MALISKAS and JOEL MALISKAS / Special to The Herald-Mail | October 10, 2009
The year is 1959. African-Americans from Hagerstown, Winchester, Martinsburg and Charles Town travel over dark, back-country roads to a common destination in southern Washington County. Hundreds of black people gather every weekend for this vital mission - to let the good times roll. Music-lovers spill out of jam-packed cars and tumble out of pickup trucks. They stream toward the rhythmic sounds throbbing from a low-lying block building. At the far end of the long narrow structure, an electrifying young entertainer dominates the event.
NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | September 17, 2009
CHARLES TOWN, W.VA. -- It has been 150 years since abolitionist John Brown was convicted of treason for his raid on the federal arsenal in Harpers Ferry, W.Va., but this weekend Brown's fateful court proceedings will come to life in the historic Jefferson County Courthouse when a group of community actors stage the "The Anvil," a play by Julia Davis. Often, retellings of Brown's story stop at his failed raid on Harpers Ferry, said Robert Willgoos, co-director of the play and history professor at Shepherd University.
NEWS
September 12, 2009
'Lighting the Fuse' MIDDLETOWN, Va. - An original drama of John Brown and Robert E. Lee. Continues through Saturday, Sept. 26. 2:30 p.m. Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays; and 8 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays. Wayside Theatre, U.S. 11. Tickets cost $10 to $30. Call 540-869-1776 or go to www.waysidetheatre.org . 'Ring of Fire' BOILING SPRINGS, Pa. - A celebration of Johnny Cash as told through the songs he composed and recorded. Continues through Sunday, Oct. 4. Allenberry Resort Inn and Playhouse, 1559 Boiling Springs Road.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | August 14, 2009
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. -- Brenda Pitts remembers standing where her uncle, John Anthony Copeland, was hanged Dec. 16, 1859. "It felt very somber," the Columbia, Ind., woman said. "I thought about what he went through. They used the wrong rope. It took 30 minutes for him to die. " Pitts was among less than a dozen descendants of John Brown, his followers and others involved in the raid on Harpers Ferry who attended a reception Friday night in the parking lot behind the Jefferson County Courthouse.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | August 9, 2009
GREENCASTLE, Pa. -- John Brown's name continues to be prominent in Harpers Ferry, W.Va., but his lesser-known compatriot John E. Cook is the focus of Allison-Antrim Museum's current exhibit. Cook gathered information in Harpers Ferry a year before the raid and passed it along to Brown for planning purposes. On the night of the raid in 1859, Cook and six others escaped into the mountains. He was captured by slave catchers near Mont Alto, Pa., and turned in for a $1,000 reward two months later.
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