Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsJohn Brown
IN THE NEWS

John Brown

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | timr@herald-mail.com | February 9, 2011
I had what I thought was a fascinating idea for a series of columns, the working title being "Back in Time With Twitter," in which I investigated how social networking might have impacted great historical events in our past. The first segment was going to involve John Brown's raid at Harpers Ferry. From there, I was going to explore how Twitter might have saved Julius Caesar from assassination, the ramifications of live video conferencing on the Constitution and the merry mixups that might arise had Jamuka friended Genghis Khan.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | October 29, 1999
YORK, Pa. - The chief interpreter for the Harpers Ferry National Historical Park said he hopes the new owner of an 1859 poster urging residents to stay inside during the execution of abolitionist John Brown will return the artifact to Harpers Ferry, W.Va. Fat chance, said buyer Wesley Small of Hanover, Pa. The poster's going to Gettysburg. Small spent $6,000 for the poster at an auction of John Brown and other Civil War artifacts at the York Fairgrounds in York Friday. The auction resumes today.
NEWS
February 15, 2009
The American Bus Association has named the upcoming John Brown sesquicentennial commemoration a Top 100 Event for 2009. Events on the list were chosen from hundreds of celebrations, festivals, fairs and commemorative events that were nominated by state tourism offices and local or regional convention and visitors bureaus. The sesquicentennial commemorates John Brown's raid on the U.S. arsenal at Harpers Ferry, W.Va., in 1859. Events celebrating the sesquicentennial begin in April and continue through mid-December.
NEWS
By ED MALISKAS and JOEL MALISKAS / Special to The Herald-Mail | October 10, 2009
The year is 1959. African-Americans from Hagerstown, Winchester, Martinsburg and Charles Town travel over dark, back-country roads to a common destination in southern Washington County. Hundreds of black people gather every weekend for this vital mission - to let the good times roll. Music-lovers spill out of jam-packed cars and tumble out of pickup trucks. They stream toward the rhythmic sounds throbbing from a low-lying block building. At the far end of the long narrow structure, an electrifying young entertainer dominates the event.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION and TRISH RUDDER | December 2, 2009
HAGERSTOWN -- There have been many events this year commemorating the 150th anniversary of abolitionist John Brown's raid on a federal arsenal in Harpers Ferry, W.Va. But Tom Riford, president of the Hagerstown-Washington County Convention and Visitors Bureau (CVB), wanted something people could "take away" to remember Brown. As a result, the CVB sponsored the production of a film examining Brown's actions and thoughts. A premiere of the 35-minute film, "Echoes of John Brown," was shown Wednesday night at the Bridge of Life Center on Potomac Street.
NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | September 17, 2009
CHARLES TOWN, W.VA. -- It has been 150 years since abolitionist John Brown was convicted of treason for his raid on the federal arsenal in Harpers Ferry, W.Va., but this weekend Brown's fateful court proceedings will come to life in the historic Jefferson County Courthouse when a group of community actors stage the "The Anvil," a play by Julia Davis. Often, retellings of Brown's story stop at his failed raid on Harpers Ferry, said Robert Willgoos, co-director of the play and history professor at Shepherd University.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | October 17, 2009
HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. -- Was John Brown's raid on a federal arsenal in Harpers Ferry in 1859 a direct cause of the Civil War? The question popped up all weekend during the 150th anniversary of Brown's failed raid on Oct. 16, 1859. The answer, at least a plausible one, came from a man taking part in a debate under a rainy tent Saturday afternoon at Harpers Ferry National Historical Park, site of a four-day celebration honoring the fiery abolitionist. It was sponsored by Shepherd University's Debate and Forensics Team.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | August 9, 2009
GREENCASTLE, Pa. -- John Brown's name continues to be prominent in Harpers Ferry, W.Va., but his lesser-known compatriot John E. Cook is the focus of Allison-Antrim Museum's current exhibit. Cook gathered information in Harpers Ferry a year before the raid and passed it along to Brown for planning purposes. On the night of the raid in 1859, Cook and six others escaped into the mountains. He was captured by slave catchers near Mont Alto, Pa., and turned in for a $1,000 reward two months later.
NEWS
By TIM ROWLAND | October 10, 2009
South Lynn has called the Kennedy Farm in southern Washington County the best-kept secret in Maryland. Whether or not that's true today, it was certainly true 150 years ago. John Brown wanted it that way. When Brown's daughter, Annie, would do the dishes, she situated herself by a window with a view of the lane, where her job was more sentry than sanitary worker. Should any visitor come whistling up the path, she'd give the high sign and 20 or so men would scurry up to the attic.
NEWS
By CRYSTAL SCHELLE | June 14, 2009
HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. -- It can be hard to convince a group of middle school students that abolitionist John Brown still has relevance today. Or better yet, have them try to convince other tweens and teens of the same thing. But Harpers Ferry Middle School has partnered with Harpers Ferry Historical National Park, The Journey Through Hallowed Ground, a nonprofit organization, and the Advisory Council on Historical Preservation, to do just that. Students at Harpers Ferry Middle School are working with Jason Hoffman, a sixth-grade math teacher and technology specialist, to produce vodcasts about the park.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OBITUARIES
September 7, 2013
Pearl Myers Naylor, 86, of Smithsburg, Md., died Friday, Sept. 6, 2013, at Coffman Nursing Home in Hagerstown, Md. Born Sept. 30, 1926, in Maryland, she was the daughter of the late Lester and Bertha Potter Brown. Pearl was preceded in death by her first husband, John K. Myers, and her second husband, Bob Naylor. She is survived by three daughters, Linda McKeever of Smithsburg, Cindy Wolfensberger of Hagerstown and Heidi Danjolu of Boonsboro, Md.; two sons, John Myers of Williamsport, Md., and Kenny Myers of Smithsburg; three brothers, John Brown and David Brown, both of Hagerstown, and Joe Brown of Thurmont, Md.; 11 grandchildren; 13 great-grandchildren; and two great-great-grandchildren.
Advertisement
ANTIETAM
By DAVE MCMILLION | July 19, 2011
As it did in other areas across the United States, the Civil War brought battles, gruesome tales and acts of destruction to what is now the Eastern Panhandle of West Virginia, but back then was part of Virginia. For West Virginia, the conflict was to have lasting implications. Virginia seceded from the Union in 1861 following decades of sectional conflict between leaders of Eastern and Western Virginia. While other states occasionally saw calls for “dismemberment,” it was only Virginia that went through such a split, according to The West Virginia Encyclopedia.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | May 25, 2011
A 3,500-pound granite monument honoring the only Marine killed during John Brown's raid in 1859 finally came to rest Tuesday in Harpers Ferry. Pvt. Luke Quinn, an Irish immigrant who joined the Marines in 1855, was killed when he was sent to Harpers Ferry in Oct. 18, 1859, in a unit commanded by then Lt. Col. Robert E. Lee to stop Brown and his raiders from taking over the U.S. arsenal there. Quinn was mortally wounded when the unit stormed Brown's barricaded engine house. A crew from Hammaker Memorials in Martinsburg, W.Va., spent more than two hours Tuesday morning installing the monument on a spit of donated land abutting the sidewalk on Potomac Street across from the train station.
OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | timr@herald-mail.com | February 9, 2011
I had what I thought was a fascinating idea for a series of columns, the working title being "Back in Time With Twitter," in which I investigated how social networking might have impacted great historical events in our past. The first segment was going to involve John Brown's raid at Harpers Ferry. From there, I was going to explore how Twitter might have saved Julius Caesar from assassination, the ramifications of live video conferencing on the Constitution and the merry mixups that might arise had Jamuka friended Genghis Khan.
NEWS
September 2, 2010
Kelsey McCullough steps into the federal armory building Thursday in Harpers Ferry, W.Va. It is near the site where abolitionist John Brown led an unsuccesful attempt to arm and free slaves in 1859. McCullough is visiting Civil War sites across the region. He lives near Palm Springs, Calif.
NEWS
December 5, 2009
The Education Branch at Harpers Ferry National Historic Park, in conjunction with the John Brown Sesquicentennial, sponsored a creative design contest for students in grades kindergarten to 12. All submissions needed to be related to John Brown and original to the artist. Categories were posters, sculptures and poetry pose. The winners were: Posters Elementary school C.W. Shipley Elementary School: first place, Eva Smith; second place, Kailey Cullen; third place, Haley Finnegan.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION and TRISH RUDDER | December 2, 2009
HAGERSTOWN -- There have been many events this year commemorating the 150th anniversary of abolitionist John Brown's raid on a federal arsenal in Harpers Ferry, W.Va. But Tom Riford, president of the Hagerstown-Washington County Convention and Visitors Bureau (CVB), wanted something people could "take away" to remember Brown. As a result, the CVB sponsored the production of a film examining Brown's actions and thoughts. A premiere of the 35-minute film, "Echoes of John Brown," was shown Wednesday night at the Bridge of Life Center on Potomac Street.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | October 17, 2009
HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. -- Was John Brown's raid on a federal arsenal in Harpers Ferry in 1859 a direct cause of the Civil War? The question popped up all weekend during the 150th anniversary of Brown's failed raid on Oct. 16, 1859. The answer, at least a plausible one, came from a man taking part in a debate under a rainy tent Saturday afternoon at Harpers Ferry National Historical Park, site of a four-day celebration honoring the fiery abolitionist. It was sponsored by Shepherd University's Debate and Forensics Team.
NEWS
October 15, 2009
HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. - For John Brown 150th Commemoration events on Friday through Sunday, visitors must park at Cavalier Heights Visitor Center parking areas off U.S. 340 and take shuttle buses to the event. Plan to arrive early and allow time to reach event. Parking is on a first-come, first-served basis. The roads in Lower Town will be closed Saturday and Sunday. Activities are set in Lower Town off Shenandoah Street in Harpers Ferry, W.Va. Events are free. For a complete schedule, go to www.nps.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|