Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsJfk
IN THE NEWS

Jfk

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By DON AINES | dona@herald-mail.com | November 10, 2012
The JFK 50 Mile began as more of a forced march, with 11 male participants, four of whom finished the grueling trek. Almost half a century later, the ultramarathon draws more than 1,000 men and women, some of them elite runners from across the country and around the world. As the level of competition increased, winning times have been cut in more than half - from 13 hours and 10 minutes the first year to a record 5 hours, 40 minutes, 45 seconds last year. Saturday is the 50th running of the JFK 50 Mile ultramarathon, which takes participants from Boonsboro to Williamsport along paved roads, the Appalachian Trail and the C&O Canal towpath.
BREAKINGNEWS
November 19, 2011
David Riddle of Cincinnati won the JFK 50 mile ultramarathon on Saturday. The 30-year-old finished in a time of 5 hours, 40 minutes and 44 seconds, breaking the JFK course record that had stood for 17 years.
OPINION
November 17, 2012
The question most often asked of participants in the JFK 50 Mile ultramarathon is simply, “Why?” Perhaps the best answer is, “Why not?” Why not take the circuitous route from Boonsboro to Williamsport, turning a 12-mile trip across Md. 68 into a 50-mile trek across rural roads, the Appalachian Trail and the C&O Canal towpath? Why not battle the elements, which have ranged from extreme heat (80-degree temperatures in 1967) to extreme cold (a wind chill of minus-15 degrees at the start in 1987)
NEWS
By KEVIN SPRADLIN | November 20, 2005
First-year assistant race director Tim Mason had many thankless tasks to perform during the John F. Kennedy 50-mile ultramarathon. His most difficult job may have been pulling runners off the course. "I was cursed at, screamed at, yelled at. ... I'm tired," Mason said after pulling several people off at the "38 Special" aid station at 38 miles. "I had to be a real (jerk) to a few people today, but I was good at it," Mason said. "The rules are rules," Mason said. It is important for Mason to get the runners off the course for their own safety.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | December 3, 2011
A dispute over whether the JFK 50 Mile ultramarathon will be allowed to continue using the Appalachian Trail and double the number of runners from 1,000 to 2,000 is escalating. After years of quiet battle, "it's time for the gloves to come off," JFK 50 Co-Director Tom Shantz said, referring to plans to pressure Appalachian National Scenic Trail Superintendent Pamela Underhill, who stands in the way. For this year's race, Shantz asked for permission to have 1,500 runners in the popular race through Washington County and was denied.
SPORTS
By ANDREW MASON | andrewm@herald-mail.com | November 19, 2011
Kathleen Luzier had a blast at the finish line at last year's JFK 50 Mile ultramarathon - helping out as a volunteer. “I loved it,” she said, “just seeing everyone's expressions.” She decided she had to give the race a try for herself. Luzier, 43, of Boonsboro, completed the JFK 50 on Saturday in 8 hours, 57 minutes, 49 seconds in her ultramarathon debut. Of the roughly 1,000 starter, she finished 197th overall, 32nd among females and - much to her surprise - first among all Washington County participants.
SPORTS
By ANDREW MASON | andrewm@herald-mail.com | November 15, 2012
Last year's 49th annual JFK 50 Mile ultramarathon was one for the ages. David Riddle passed Michael Wardian late in the race and held on to win in a course-record time of 5 hours, 40 minutes, 45 seconds. Wardian finished second in 5:43:24, also dipping under the previous mark of 5:46:22 set in 1994 by Eric Clifton, whose record once seemed untouchable. “It was pretty special last year,” Riddle, 31, of Cincinnati, said in a phone interview this week. “Everything just came together perfectly.” While Wardian is sidelined with an injury, Riddle will be back to defend his title Saturday at the 50th annual JFK 50 Mile, the largest, oldest and arguably most prestigious ultramarathon in the U.S. “It's definitely a big year,” Riddle said.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | November 15, 2011
Jim Hennigan has been training since July for his first attempt at the JFK 50 Mile, and the 36-year-old is realistic about his expectations.   “I'm not going to win this race, but I am going to challenge myself,” he said. “For me, it's just knowing that I can push my body that far.” Henningan - who at 6 feet tall and 225 pounds doesn't fit the stereotype of distance runners - came late to marathons, making his first attempt in October 2009 at Freedom's Run in Shepherdstown, W.Va.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | November 26, 2011
Laszlo Madaras has finished the grueling JFK 50 Mile ultramarathon nine times, but things were different when he ran it last Saturday. Before the race started, the physician at Waynesboro (Pa.) Hospital and Chambersburg (Pa.) Hospital learned that his close colleague at Chambersburg Hospital had died. Marty Heine, Chambersburg Hospital's emergency room physician, was hiking with his wife on the Appalachian Trail in Greene Township, Pa., the day before the JFK 50 Mile when he collapsed.
SPORTS
By ANDREW MASON | andrewm@herald-mail.com | November 18, 2012
A milestone day at the oldest and largest ultramarathon in the country had fitting results, as Max King and Ellie Greenwood set course records at the 50th annual JFK 50 Mile on Saturday. King, 32, of Bend, Ore., conquered the 50.2-mile course - which started in Boonsboro and finished in Williamsport - in 5 hours, 34 minutes and 58 seconds. He averaged 6:42 per mile to top the field of roughly 1,000 runners. Trent Briney, 34, of Boulder, Colo., finished second in 5:37:56, also dipping under the previous course-record time of 5:40:45, set last year by David Riddle, who finished third this year in 5:45:13.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
By ART CALLAHAM | May 12, 2013
I was never a “Kennedyphile” - lifelong southern conservative Republicans usually are not. Sure, I was a starry-eyed 15-year-old who understood “Camelot,” liked the pictures of bikini clad Jackie-O (as she was later to be called), and can recall to this day where I was at 2 p.m. EST on Friday, Nov. 22, 1963, when news of John F. Kennedy's assassination was broadcast over the public address system at Hinton (W.Va.) High School. I had just left fourth period and was heading to fifth period Solid Geometry (boy, I hated that class)
Advertisement
NEWS
April 17, 2013
Mike Spinnler, director of the JFK 50 Mile ultramarathon, will be the guest speaker for the annual True Grit Awards Ceremony that will be held Tuesday, May 14, starting at 6 p.m. at Fountain Head Country Club. Tickets cost $25 and are available by calling the Hagerstown YMCA at 301-739-3990. The event is sponsored by the Hagerstown YMCA, Washington County Public Schools, The Herald-Mail Co., Cumberland Valley Athletic Club and the Hagerstown-Washington County Convention and Visitors Bureau.
NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | January 21, 2013
Hagerstown residents Mike Hennesy and Dick Martin weren't in Washington, D.C., Monday for the inauguration of President Obama, but they played a role in an inaugural parade more than 50 years ago. Hennesy and Martin were members of the South Hagerstown High School band that marched in the Jan. 20, 1961, inaugural parade for John F. Kennedy. One of their memories of that day is the weather. “I can't ever remember it being that cold, and it just wouldn't go away,” Martin, 67, said.
OPINION
November 28, 2012
“I don't understand all of the negative feelings about the JFK 50 Mile. It is only one day out of the year, and I'm sure that you can tolerate any inconvenience it may cause you for such a short time. After all, this event is unique to Washington County. No place else has carried JFK's challenge forward. Plus, it brings people and money to the area.” - Boonsboro “I hope the people of this part of the country get rid of Young in Frederick, Md., and get rid of this governor we have.
SPORTS
By ANDREW MASON | andrewm@herald-mail.com | November 18, 2012
A milestone day at the oldest and largest ultramarathon in the country had fitting results, as Max King and Ellie Greenwood set course records at the 50th annual JFK 50 Mile on Saturday. King, 32, of Bend, Ore., conquered the 50.2-mile course - which started in Boonsboro and finished in Williamsport - in 5 hours, 34 minutes and 58 seconds. He averaged 6:42 per mile to top the field of roughly 1,000 runners. Trent Briney, 34, of Boulder, Colo., finished second in 5:37:56, also dipping under the previous course-record time of 5:40:45, set last year by David Riddle, who finished third this year in 5:45:13.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | November 18, 2012
Dave Fox was basking Sunday in the success of being able to complete his 20th JFK 50 Mile ultramarathon on Saturday, putting him in the ranks of the event's 1,000-mile club. And although Fox said before the race that this would probably be his last annual running of the event, he was rethinking his plans Sunday, saying there are many things he would miss about not being in it every year. First-time JFK runner Mary Ellis, 63, of Keedysville, slipped on some wet leaves on a rock on the Appalachian trail and hurt her left knee when she fell.
SPORTS
By ANDREW MASON | andrewm@herald-mail.com | November 18, 2012
With 5 miles left, Greg Zaruba was down but not out Saturday at the 50th annual JFK 50 Mile ultramarathon. “I wasn't taking enough electrolytes and I started cramping horribly,” said Zaruba, 46, of Smithsburg. “With 5 miles to go, I fell on someone's front lawn and was screaming and didn't know if I would even finish. “But,” he added, “I got up and finished.” Zaruba was the top Washington County finisher, placing 46th overall in the field of roughly 1,000 runners in 7 hours, 21 minutes, 42 seconds.
SPORTS
By BOB PARASILITI | November 18, 2012
Sometimes, love hurts. Max King can attest to that. He was in pain on Saturday and loving every minute of it. “Wow! That hurt!” he exclaimed as he crossed the finish line of his first JFK 50 Mile ultramarathon, just in front of Williamsport's Springfield Middle School. His agony was ecstasy. What wasn't there to love? King won the race. It wasn't just any race, run on just any course to achieve just any accomplishment. He covered the 50.2-mile course in a record 5 hours, 34 minutes and 58 seconds to win the milestone 50th edition of “America's Ultramarathon,” the largest, oldest and quite possibly most prestigious such event in the country.
OPINION
November 17, 2012
The question most often asked of participants in the JFK 50 Mile ultramarathon is simply, “Why?” Perhaps the best answer is, “Why not?” Why not take the circuitous route from Boonsboro to Williamsport, turning a 12-mile trip across Md. 68 into a 50-mile trek across rural roads, the Appalachian Trail and the C&O Canal towpath? Why not battle the elements, which have ranged from extreme heat (80-degree temperatures in 1967) to extreme cold (a wind chill of minus-15 degrees at the start in 1987)
NEWS
By C.J. LOVELACE | cj.lovelace@herald-mail.com | November 17, 2012
Ultramarathon runner Dink Taylor's time of 7 hours, 40 minutes in the 50th annual JFK 50 Mile ultramarathon on Saturday was 41 minutes slower than his performance in last year's event. Pretty remarkable considering that just three months ago, he was fighting for his life. The 47-year-old from Huntsville, Ala., came down with a severe headache Aug. 29 and it landed him in the hospital for 10 days. While there, doctors told Taylor that he had suffered a stroke and had a 40 percent chance of death or paralysis, and a 70 percent chance of death if he experienced any further brain hemorrhaging.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|