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NEWS
June 4, 2006
J.R. Towles hit a two-run home run in the third inning to provide all the offense Lexington needed to hand the Hagerstown Suns a 3-1 loss Saturday in the completion of Thursday's suspended game. The loss in the first game of the doubleheader was the ninth straight for the struggling Suns. With the score tied at 1-1 and a runner on, Towles launched Jeff Landing's pitch into the jet stream to right field and it carried the fence for the two-run blast. Landing took the loss, coming back to pick up the game from Thursday, despite allowing two earned runs.
NEWS
By DON AINES | June 29, 1998
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - The Tri-State area weathered some severe storms during June, and the month may go out with yet more thunderstorms, according to the National Weather Service. Weather Service Meteorologist Rick Winther said Monday the region can expect showers and thunderstorms today as a cold front pushes through the area from the Ohio Valley. Some of those thunderstorms could be severe, he said. "Just normal, active summertime weather," Winther said. "You have a very active jet stream just north of the area," Winther said of the band of fast-moving winds in the stratosphere that can affect the weather.
NEWS
By KIMBERLY YAKOWSKI | September 23, 1998
The dry weather faced by the Tri-State area during much of the summer is not over yet even though the seasons changed at 1:37 a.m. today, forecasters are predicting. Thus far, .87 of an inch of rainfall has been measured in Hagerstown during the month of September, according to weather observer Greg Keefer. Keefer said 39.13 inches have fallen for the year. Area farmers at Clopper Orchards and Harding's Orchards, both of Smithsburg, said that despite the scarcity of rain, they harvested a healthy crop of pumpkins, gourds and Indian corn.
NEWS
May 29, 1997
By KAREN MASTERSON Staff Writer For predictions on how long the area's cool weather will last, experts are looking to Western Greenland. They say a stubborn cold front there is blocking the normal jet stream patterns that bring warm, muggy weather up from the Gulf of Mexico at this time of year. The usual balmy summer is on its way, according to Steve Zubrick, a meteorologist with the Baltimore/Washington Forecast Office of the National Weather Service. Weather patterns to the north are merely postponing the inevitable, he said.
NEWS
December 20, 1997
Winter arrives Sunday Winter arrives today, bringing with it a return to cooler air that seems more suited to the season. "We're going to be pretty chilly the next few days," said Jim Vaughn, a National Weather Service meteorologist who lives near Smithsburg. Today temperatures are expected to peak in the low 40s and the high could dip into the 30s on Monday. It's a stark change to the above-average temperatures the area has been basking in for the past several days.
NEWS
By TIM ROWLAND | June 10, 2009
o If you like reading Tim Rowland, you'll love watching him. See what else Tim has to say Quick, how many lightning strikes have we had in the United States through June 3? If you said 5,589,686, come on down, because you obviously know your thunderstorms. And you are probably already aware that for the same time period a year ago, we had 6,517,381 lightning strikes. I know what you're thinking: Now that I know that, what do I do? I'm pretty much thinking the same thing.
NEWS
by KAREN HANNA | March 20, 2006
TRI-STATE - On winter's last full day, 7-year-old Cameron Byrd went looking for a fish. "I want the gold one," he said as he peered into the pond at City Park. Bountiful sunshine bathed the area Sunday, as chilly temperatures ushered out winter. Spring starts at 1:26 p.m today, according to the U.S. Naval Observatory. The Byrd family of Martinsburg, W.Va. said they brought three loaves of bread to feed the fish and ducks. Tina Byrd, Cameron's mother, said she was a little disappointed by this winter's mild weather.
NEWS
by JENNIFER FITCH | April 20, 2006
WAYNESBORO, PA. Todd Toth has taught in Waynesboro Area School District classrooms for 29 years, but recently he educated his high schoolers from a vastly different venue - a jet flying 46,000 feet over Hawaii at speeds of more than 500 mph. Toth kept in communication with his students during his 10 days as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's first "Teacher in the Air. " His daily log from Hawaii started with the...
NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | July 12, 2005
Mother Nature sure knows how to hurt a guy. Or perhaps, I just got too greedy. Maybe you had noticed. For the past two months, I've been biding my time, using the exquisite patience and meticulousness of one who is carefully barbecuing a whole goat over a spit. Just a couple more days, I kept thinking, just a couple more days. Not too soon, let the situation get good and ripe and then let an unsuspecting public have it with both barrels. I reckoned I was about a week away.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | August 17, 1999
Global warming, La Niña, sunspots, the alignment of the planets ... While most people just want the Tri-State area's prolonged drought to end, others are analyzing and debating the cause. [cont. from front page ] In general, weather experts blame a combination of displaced weather patterns: The jet stream is farther north than usual, the Bermuda high pressure system is farther west than normal, and then there's La Niña. Normally during a La Niña year the Tri-State area would be wetter than normal, said Ken Pickering, acting state climatologist for Maryland.
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NEWS
By TIM ROWLAND | June 10, 2009
o If you like reading Tim Rowland, you'll love watching him. See what else Tim has to say Quick, how many lightning strikes have we had in the United States through June 3? If you said 5,589,686, come on down, because you obviously know your thunderstorms. And you are probably already aware that for the same time period a year ago, we had 6,517,381 lightning strikes. I know what you're thinking: Now that I know that, what do I do? I'm pretty much thinking the same thing.
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NEWS
June 4, 2006
J.R. Towles hit a two-run home run in the third inning to provide all the offense Lexington needed to hand the Hagerstown Suns a 3-1 loss Saturday in the completion of Thursday's suspended game. The loss in the first game of the doubleheader was the ninth straight for the struggling Suns. With the score tied at 1-1 and a runner on, Towles launched Jeff Landing's pitch into the jet stream to right field and it carried the fence for the two-run blast. Landing took the loss, coming back to pick up the game from Thursday, despite allowing two earned runs.
NEWS
by JENNIFER FITCH | April 20, 2006
WAYNESBORO, PA. Todd Toth has taught in Waynesboro Area School District classrooms for 29 years, but recently he educated his high schoolers from a vastly different venue - a jet flying 46,000 feet over Hawaii at speeds of more than 500 mph. Toth kept in communication with his students during his 10 days as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's first "Teacher in the Air. " His daily log from Hawaii started with the...
NEWS
by KAREN HANNA | March 20, 2006
TRI-STATE - On winter's last full day, 7-year-old Cameron Byrd went looking for a fish. "I want the gold one," he said as he peered into the pond at City Park. Bountiful sunshine bathed the area Sunday, as chilly temperatures ushered out winter. Spring starts at 1:26 p.m today, according to the U.S. Naval Observatory. The Byrd family of Martinsburg, W.Va. said they brought three loaves of bread to feed the fish and ducks. Tina Byrd, Cameron's mother, said she was a little disappointed by this winter's mild weather.
NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | July 12, 2005
Mother Nature sure knows how to hurt a guy. Or perhaps, I just got too greedy. Maybe you had noticed. For the past two months, I've been biding my time, using the exquisite patience and meticulousness of one who is carefully barbecuing a whole goat over a spit. Just a couple more days, I kept thinking, just a couple more days. Not too soon, let the situation get good and ripe and then let an unsuspecting public have it with both barrels. I reckoned I was about a week away.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | August 17, 1999
Global warming, La Niña, sunspots, the alignment of the planets ... While most people just want the Tri-State area's prolonged drought to end, others are analyzing and debating the cause. [cont. from front page ] In general, weather experts blame a combination of displaced weather patterns: The jet stream is farther north than usual, the Bermuda high pressure system is farther west than normal, and then there's La Niña. Normally during a La Niña year the Tri-State area would be wetter than normal, said Ken Pickering, acting state climatologist for Maryland.
NEWS
By KIMBERLY YAKOWSKI | September 23, 1998
The dry weather faced by the Tri-State area during much of the summer is not over yet even though the seasons changed at 1:37 a.m. today, forecasters are predicting. Thus far, .87 of an inch of rainfall has been measured in Hagerstown during the month of September, according to weather observer Greg Keefer. Keefer said 39.13 inches have fallen for the year. Area farmers at Clopper Orchards and Harding's Orchards, both of Smithsburg, said that despite the scarcity of rain, they harvested a healthy crop of pumpkins, gourds and Indian corn.
NEWS
By DON AINES | June 29, 1998
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - The Tri-State area weathered some severe storms during June, and the month may go out with yet more thunderstorms, according to the National Weather Service. Weather Service Meteorologist Rick Winther said Monday the region can expect showers and thunderstorms today as a cold front pushes through the area from the Ohio Valley. Some of those thunderstorms could be severe, he said. "Just normal, active summertime weather," Winther said. "You have a very active jet stream just north of the area," Winther said of the band of fast-moving winds in the stratosphere that can affect the weather.
NEWS
December 20, 1997
Winter arrives Sunday Winter arrives today, bringing with it a return to cooler air that seems more suited to the season. "We're going to be pretty chilly the next few days," said Jim Vaughn, a National Weather Service meteorologist who lives near Smithsburg. Today temperatures are expected to peak in the low 40s and the high could dip into the 30s on Monday. It's a stark change to the above-average temperatures the area has been basking in for the past several days.
NEWS
May 29, 1997
By KAREN MASTERSON Staff Writer For predictions on how long the area's cool weather will last, experts are looking to Western Greenland. They say a stubborn cold front there is blocking the normal jet stream patterns that bring warm, muggy weather up from the Gulf of Mexico at this time of year. The usual balmy summer is on its way, according to Steve Zubrick, a meteorologist with the Baltimore/Washington Forecast Office of the National Weather Service. Weather patterns to the north are merely postponing the inevitable, he said.
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