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Jerry Sandusky

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BREAKINGNEWS
November 9, 2011
Penn State trustees fired football coach Joe Paterno and university president Graham Spanier amid the growing furor over how the school handled sex abuse allegations against an assistant coach. The massive shakeup Wednesday night came hours after Paterno announced that he planned to retire at the end of his 46th season. But the outcry following the arrest of former assistant coach Jerry Sandusky on molestation charges proved too much for the board to ignore. One key question has been why Paterno and other top school officials didn't go to police in 2002 after being told a graduate assistant saw Sandusky assaulting a boy in a school shower.Paterno says he should have done more.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | November 13, 2011
A Franklin County, Pa., man returned to Penn State University's gridiron Saturday, standing on the sidelines with other past players to support his beloved football program and former coach. Bob Campbell was a running back for the Nittany Lions from 1966 to 1968, the first years the team was led by legendary coach Joe Paterno. Joe Pa, as the man became known on his way to 409 wins, lost his job last week amid a child sex scandal involving a former assistant coach. Campbell, now 64, described his initial relationship with Paterno as being similar to that between oil and water.
NEWS
August 16, 2013
(AP) - Jerry Sandusky might have to testify in person if he wants to win back the pension he earned during three decades at Penn State University - and former FBI Director Louis Freeh could be called as a witness, as well. Sandusky, 69, lost his $4,900-a-month pension on Oct. 9, the day he was sentenced to 30 to 60 years in prison for sexual abuse of 10 boys. The forfeiture also made his wife, Dottie, ineligible for benefits. Sandusky appealed the revocation. The hearing examiner charged with handling the appeal wrote last month that his lawyers and the State Employees' Retirement System, or SERS, both may want the former Penn State assistant football coach to testify at a Jan. 7 hearing.
NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com | November 9, 2011
Penn State Mont Alto students had plenty to say Wednesday about coaching legend Joe Paterno being caught in the center of a child sex abuse scandal involving a former assistant coach, but faculty and staff remained mum on the topic. The 84-year-old Paterno, who has coached the Nittany Lions' football team for 46 years, was fired Wednesday night. Paterno said he was “absolutely devastated” by the case, in which Jerry Sandusky, his one-time heir apparent and assistant coach, has been charged with molesting eight boys in 15 years, including at the Penn State football complex.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | June 30, 2012
Ann Van Kuren is a wife, mother, teacher and dancer who will forever be known as Juror 11 from one of Pennsylvania's most notorious criminal trials. Van Kuren received her first-ever jury summons in early May, a month before the start of Jerry Sandusky's trial on 48 criminal counts involving sexual abuse of young boys. The former Penn State University defensive coordinator was convicted June 22 on 45 of the counts, and immediately taken to jail to await sentencing. In a phone interview with The Herald-Mail, Van Kuren several times used the word “compelling” when describing eight victims' testimony.
NEWS
By KAUSTUV BASU | kaustuv.basu@herald-mail.com | April 4, 2013
A bill introduced by two local legislators that could become law would make it a crime to interfere with the reporting of suspected child abuse or neglect. Current Maryland law requires teachers, counselors, social workers, caseworkers, and parole or probation officers to notify appropriate agencies if they suspect child abuse. The bill seeks to punish anyone who tries to interfere with such reporting. The legislation was introduced in the House of Delegates by Del. Michael J. Hough, R-Frederick/Washington, and in the Senate by state Sen. Christopher B. Shank, R-Washington.
NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | October 9, 2012
For students at Penn State Mont Alto and residents in the surrounding area, Tuesday's sentencing of convicted child sexual abuser Jerry Sandusky brought reaction ranging from a sense of closure to a feeling that the sentence was not harsh enough. A judge ordered Sandusky to serve at least 30 years in prison Tuesday. “What he got is what he deserved, and the victims can sleep better knowing he can't hurt anyone anymore,” Waynesboro, Pa., resident Camie Biggs, 19, said. “The sentence is fair.” Despite what is effectively a life sentence for Sandusky, the 68-year-old former defensive coordinator for Penn State's football program, Matthew Gossert, 20, of Waynesboro felt the sentence was not long enough.
NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | July 12, 2012
Matthew Furman of Chambersburg, Pa., said he was not surprised Thursday when he heard that former Penn State football coach Joe Paterno, according to a report, helped cover up child abuse allegations against Jerry Sandusky more than a decade ago. “I don't think that a guy like Paterno, who was so plugged into the program for so many years, could not have known about it,” Furman said. “I don't see how that's possible.” Furman, 35, was among area residents who shared their thoughts Thursday on the report issued by former FBI Director Louis Freeh, who was hired by Penn State University trustees to look into the child sex abuse scandal that ultimately resulted in Paterno's firing in November 2011.
OPINION
By LLOYD WATERS | July 22, 2012
Joe Paterno was the face of the Nittany Lions. He was Mr. Football on the Penn State sidelines and nothing should have taken him away from the game of football except for death. I was sure that's the way it was going to end for Papa Joe. But it didn't happen that way. When you read Louis Freeh's investigative report, the only real conclusion that you can leave with is that Joe Paterno and the leadership of Penn State knew exactly what Jerry Sandusky was doing. They had their real suspicions, but failed to stop the guy from his sick behavior.
SPORTS
July 23, 2012
The NCAA dropped the hammer on Penn State University on Monday, effectively crippling its once-storied-but-now-stained football program for years to come and doing so with incredible haste. Just weeks after former assistant coach Jerry Sandusky was convicted of dozens of counts of child sexual abuse and days after the release of the Penn State-commissioned Freeh Report, the NCAA banned the Nittany Lions from the postseason for four years, stripped them of 40 scholarships, vacated 111 wins from 1998 to 2011 and fined the university $60 million.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 16, 2013
(AP) - Jerry Sandusky might have to testify in person if he wants to win back the pension he earned during three decades at Penn State University - and former FBI Director Louis Freeh could be called as a witness, as well. Sandusky, 69, lost his $4,900-a-month pension on Oct. 9, the day he was sentenced to 30 to 60 years in prison for sexual abuse of 10 boys. The forfeiture also made his wife, Dottie, ineligible for benefits. Sandusky appealed the revocation. The hearing examiner charged with handling the appeal wrote last month that his lawyers and the State Employees' Retirement System, or SERS, both may want the former Penn State assistant football coach to testify at a Jan. 7 hearing.
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NEWS
By KAUSTUV BASU | kaustuv.basu@herald-mail.com | April 4, 2013
A bill introduced by two local legislators that could become law would make it a crime to interfere with the reporting of suspected child abuse or neglect. Current Maryland law requires teachers, counselors, social workers, caseworkers, and parole or probation officers to notify appropriate agencies if they suspect child abuse. The bill seeks to punish anyone who tries to interfere with such reporting. The legislation was introduced in the House of Delegates by Del. Michael J. Hough, R-Frederick/Washington, and in the Senate by state Sen. Christopher B. Shank, R-Washington.
NEWS
February 13, 2013
A bill that would enhance penalties for adults who physically attack and/or harm minors unanimously passed the Pennsylvania House of Representatives this week. House Bill 350 was authored by state Rep. Todd Rock, R-Franklin. The measure was drafted by Rock based on the recommendations of the Pennsylvania Task Force on Child Protection that was created by the Pennsylvania General Assembly in the wake of the Jerry Sandusky child abuse scandal, according to a news release. If signed into law, anyone 18 years of age or older who causes bodily injury to a child younger than 12 could be charged with a first-degree misdemeanor.
NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | October 9, 2012
For students at Penn State Mont Alto and residents in the surrounding area, Tuesday's sentencing of convicted child sexual abuser Jerry Sandusky brought reaction ranging from a sense of closure to a feeling that the sentence was not harsh enough. A judge ordered Sandusky to serve at least 30 years in prison Tuesday. “What he got is what he deserved, and the victims can sleep better knowing he can't hurt anyone anymore,” Waynesboro, Pa., resident Camie Biggs, 19, said. “The sentence is fair.” Despite what is effectively a life sentence for Sandusky, the 68-year-old former defensive coordinator for Penn State's football program, Matthew Gossert, 20, of Waynesboro felt the sentence was not long enough.
SPORTS
July 23, 2012
The NCAA dropped the hammer on Penn State University on Monday, effectively crippling its once-storied-but-now-stained football program for years to come and doing so with incredible haste. Just weeks after former assistant coach Jerry Sandusky was convicted of dozens of counts of child sexual abuse and days after the release of the Penn State-commissioned Freeh Report, the NCAA banned the Nittany Lions from the postseason for four years, stripped them of 40 scholarships, vacated 111 wins from 1998 to 2011 and fined the university $60 million.
OPINION
By LLOYD WATERS | July 22, 2012
Joe Paterno was the face of the Nittany Lions. He was Mr. Football on the Penn State sidelines and nothing should have taken him away from the game of football except for death. I was sure that's the way it was going to end for Papa Joe. But it didn't happen that way. When you read Louis Freeh's investigative report, the only real conclusion that you can leave with is that Joe Paterno and the leadership of Penn State knew exactly what Jerry Sandusky was doing. They had their real suspicions, but failed to stop the guy from his sick behavior.
NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | July 12, 2012
Matthew Furman of Chambersburg, Pa., said he was not surprised Thursday when he heard that former Penn State football coach Joe Paterno, according to a report, helped cover up child abuse allegations against Jerry Sandusky more than a decade ago. “I don't think that a guy like Paterno, who was so plugged into the program for so many years, could not have known about it,” Furman said. “I don't see how that's possible.” Furman, 35, was among area residents who shared their thoughts Thursday on the report issued by former FBI Director Louis Freeh, who was hired by Penn State University trustees to look into the child sex abuse scandal that ultimately resulted in Paterno's firing in November 2011.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | June 30, 2012
Ann Van Kuren is a wife, mother, teacher and dancer who will forever be known as Juror 11 from one of Pennsylvania's most notorious criminal trials. Van Kuren received her first-ever jury summons in early May, a month before the start of Jerry Sandusky's trial on 48 criminal counts involving sexual abuse of young boys. The former Penn State University defensive coordinator was convicted June 22 on 45 of the counts, and immediately taken to jail to await sentencing. In a phone interview with The Herald-Mail, Van Kuren several times used the word “compelling” when describing eight victims' testimony.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | November 13, 2011
A Franklin County, Pa., man returned to Penn State University's gridiron Saturday, standing on the sidelines with other past players to support his beloved football program and former coach. Bob Campbell was a running back for the Nittany Lions from 1966 to 1968, the first years the team was led by legendary coach Joe Paterno. Joe Pa, as the man became known on his way to 409 wins, lost his job last week amid a child sex scandal involving a former assistant coach. Campbell, now 64, described his initial relationship with Paterno as being similar to that between oil and water.
NEWS
Bill Kohler | November 12, 2011
The systemic failure of Penn State University to do the right thing in the Jerry Sandusky sex abuse scandal is so mammoth and widespread that it's hard to get your head around it. The more layers that are peeled back, the more rotten the onion. Despite being a longtime newspaper person who has seen and read all forms of human depravity, it still curdles my stomach to read what allegedly went on behind closed doors with Sandusky, the former Penn State football assistant coach now charged with 40 counts of abusing young boys.
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