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NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | June 16, 1998
A former Roxbury Correctional Institution inmate who was in court earlier this month after he refused to take his insulin has been transferred to the Maryland House of Correction in Jessup. The case of Leroy Melvin Griffin was taken to Washington County Circuit Judge W. Kennedy Boone III June 3. Boone granted a temporary restraining order that allowed treatment to proceed. Griffin, a diabetic, stopped taking his twice-daily insulin on May 31, according to Dr. Mohammed Moubarek, associate medical director of Correctional Medical Services in Hagerstown.
NEWS
March 1, 2004
There are 18.2 million people in the United States with diabetes and about one-third of them do not know they have it. A person with diabetes has too much glucose or sugar in their blood. According to registered nurse Susan Akridge, program manager of Robinwood Endocrinology, the body needs glucose for energy. But too much glucose in the blood is dangerous to a person's health. Insulin is a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into the energy needed for daily life.
NEWS
March 14, 1997
If you don't know, it's time to find out By KATE COLEMAN Staff Writer Ellen Scott says she was extremely tired the summer before last. She wrote it off to stress and being older than 40. She was very thirsty and was drinking and urinating more than usual. These are classic symptoms of diabetes, but Scott, now 45, didn't put them all together. A blood test during a routine gynecological exam showed an elevated level of sugar in her blood. Scott, like half of the 16 million Americans with the disease, didn't know she had diabetes.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | November 29, 2006
WILLIAMSPORT - Alan Artz II celebrated one year without diabetes on Thanksgiving with a piece of white cake with chocolate icing. The 21-year-old autistic man - a diabetic since he was 4 years old - underwent a pancreas transplant Nov. 23, 2005, at the University of Virginia Medical Center in Charlottesville, Va. "You can't help but say a prayer of Thanksgiving," said his stepmother, Diane Artz. "What happened to him is nothing short of a miracle. " When Alan was diagnosed with diabetes at age 4, his blood sugar level was measured at more than 1,000, said Diane Artz, who also is a nurse.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | June 18, 2006
HAGERSTOWN John Hopkins was smooth with his technique. He leaned in, puckered up and laid his lips on ... the rear end of a baby pig. At the point of contact, the groans from the crowd Saturday at Municipal Stadium were noticeable. Moments later, the applause and the pats on the back from his colleagues began. Hopkins kissed the pig to raise money for diabetes research. He said the smooch was no big deal. It's an activity he must be used to because it's the third time in as many years that he's done it. "I've always been kissing the butt of that bad boy," Hopkins said.
NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | July 19, 2004
katec@herald-mail.com Looking back, Dianna Clever, 45, said she isn't surprised that she was diagnosed with diabetes on April 14. She had been having trouble seeing fine print and had gotten bifocals last fall. She had awoken with a severe thirst in the middle of the night. Her mother had diabetes, was on insulin for 17 years, and died at age 56. In hindsight, Dale Bird also recognized symptoms he didn't connect with the disease until he got the news from the doctor last February.
NEWS
By CHAD SMITH | February 2, 2009
I recently read a report about a new study published in the journal BioMed Central Endocrine Disorders that claims seven minutes of good, hard weekly exercise is enough to help prevent and even control type 2 diabetes, which affects the body's ability to use insulin to convert food into energy. The report from www.reuters.com says that the London study asked a group of overweight, but healthy young men to ridd an exercise bike four times daily in 30 second spurts (high intensity interval training)
NEWS
By MARIE GILBERT | July 1, 2007
HAGERSTOWN-So what is it about a pig that had people clamoring for a kiss? Some said it was fun. Others weren't so sure. But for those who participated, it was all about puckering up for a good cause. Kiss a Pig, a fundraiser for diabetes research, was held Saturday night prior to the Hagerstown Suns game at Municipal Stadium. The event was sponsored by District 22-W Lions Clubs. The district includes more than 2,000 members from Washington, Frederick, Carroll, Garrett and Allegany counties in Maryland.
NEWS
By MARIE GILBERT | June 30, 2007
So what is it about a pig that had people clamoring for a kiss? Some said it was fun. Others weren't so sure. But for those who participated, it was all about puckering up for a good cause. Kiss a Pig, a fundraiser for diabetes research, was held Saturday night prior to the Hagerstown Suns game at Municipal Stadium. The event was sponsored by District 22-W Lions Clubs, which includes more than 2,000 members from Washington, Frederick, Carroll, Garrett and Allegany counties in Maryland.
NEWS
January 14, 1999
Editor's note - Please be as brief as possible when calling Mail Call, The Daily Mail's reader call-in line. Mail Call is not staffed on weekends or holidays so it is best to call Mail Call weekdays at 301-791-6236. Readers are welcome to leave their recorded message on any topic they choose, but some calls are screened out. Here are some of the calls we have received lately: "This is in response to the person in Monday's Mail Call that said the increase for Social Security was just very small and they have diabetes, and they have to pay for all medicine, insulin and syringes.
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NEWS
By CHAD SMITH | February 2, 2009
I recently read a report about a new study published in the journal BioMed Central Endocrine Disorders that claims seven minutes of good, hard weekly exercise is enough to help prevent and even control type 2 diabetes, which affects the body's ability to use insulin to convert food into energy. The report from www.reuters.com says that the London study asked a group of overweight, but healthy young men to ridd an exercise bike four times daily in 30 second spurts (high intensity interval training)
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NEWS
By MARIE GILBERT | July 1, 2007
HAGERSTOWN-So what is it about a pig that had people clamoring for a kiss? Some said it was fun. Others weren't so sure. But for those who participated, it was all about puckering up for a good cause. Kiss a Pig, a fundraiser for diabetes research, was held Saturday night prior to the Hagerstown Suns game at Municipal Stadium. The event was sponsored by District 22-W Lions Clubs. The district includes more than 2,000 members from Washington, Frederick, Carroll, Garrett and Allegany counties in Maryland.
NEWS
By MARIE GILBERT | June 30, 2007
So what is it about a pig that had people clamoring for a kiss? Some said it was fun. Others weren't so sure. But for those who participated, it was all about puckering up for a good cause. Kiss a Pig, a fundraiser for diabetes research, was held Saturday night prior to the Hagerstown Suns game at Municipal Stadium. The event was sponsored by District 22-W Lions Clubs, which includes more than 2,000 members from Washington, Frederick, Carroll, Garrett and Allegany counties in Maryland.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | November 29, 2006
WILLIAMSPORT - Alan Artz II celebrated one year without diabetes on Thanksgiving with a piece of white cake with chocolate icing. The 21-year-old autistic man - a diabetic since he was 4 years old - underwent a pancreas transplant Nov. 23, 2005, at the University of Virginia Medical Center in Charlottesville, Va. "You can't help but say a prayer of Thanksgiving," said his stepmother, Diane Artz. "What happened to him is nothing short of a miracle. " When Alan was diagnosed with diabetes at age 4, his blood sugar level was measured at more than 1,000, said Diane Artz, who also is a nurse.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | June 18, 2006
HAGERSTOWN John Hopkins was smooth with his technique. He leaned in, puckered up and laid his lips on ... the rear end of a baby pig. At the point of contact, the groans from the crowd Saturday at Municipal Stadium were noticeable. Moments later, the applause and the pats on the back from his colleagues began. Hopkins kissed the pig to raise money for diabetes research. He said the smooch was no big deal. It's an activity he must be used to because it's the third time in as many years that he's done it. "I've always been kissing the butt of that bad boy," Hopkins said.
NEWS
BY KRISTIN WILSON | March 4, 2006
Americans have lots of problems. And drug companies have lots of solutions. Try sticking antidepressant medication on your skin, or breathe deeply for a dose of insulin. These ideas sound revolutionary, but they are just a glimpse of recent pharmaceutical innovations. Still, they mean nothing without a stamp of approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Aministration. Almost every day, the FDA takes action on new products that can make American lives better and pharmaceutical companies richer.
NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | July 19, 2004
katec@herald-mail.com Looking back, Dianna Clever, 45, said she isn't surprised that she was diagnosed with diabetes on April 14. She had been having trouble seeing fine print and had gotten bifocals last fall. She had awoken with a severe thirst in the middle of the night. Her mother had diabetes, was on insulin for 17 years, and died at age 56. In hindsight, Dale Bird also recognized symptoms he didn't connect with the disease until he got the news from the doctor last February.
NEWS
March 1, 2004
There are 18.2 million people in the United States with diabetes and about one-third of them do not know they have it. A person with diabetes has too much glucose or sugar in their blood. According to registered nurse Susan Akridge, program manager of Robinwood Endocrinology, the body needs glucose for energy. But too much glucose in the blood is dangerous to a person's health. Insulin is a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into the energy needed for daily life.
NEWS
January 14, 1999
Editor's note - Please be as brief as possible when calling Mail Call, The Daily Mail's reader call-in line. Mail Call is not staffed on weekends or holidays so it is best to call Mail Call weekdays at 301-791-6236. Readers are welcome to leave their recorded message on any topic they choose, but some calls are screened out. Here are some of the calls we have received lately: "This is in response to the person in Monday's Mail Call that said the increase for Social Security was just very small and they have diabetes, and they have to pay for all medicine, insulin and syringes.
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