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NEWS
By BRENDAN KIRBY | October 8, 1999
Several Maryland nursing home administrators complained to a state task force in Hagerstown Friday of onerous regulations and inspectors who favor intimidation over cooperation. At the same time, some citizens called for reforms that would improve the care of their loved ones. The testimony suggested the task force will have a difficult time satisfying both concerns. "That's a very delicate balance," said Maryland Secretary of Aging Sue F. Ward, the panel's chairwoman.
OBITUARIES
By JANET HEIM | janeth@herald-mail.com | December 10, 2010
Raised on a farm with a strong work ethic and a knack for all things mechanical, Thurman Sizer “T.S.” Alphin was known for working with his hands and rarely being idle. He also developed a love of airplanes. “He loved fixing things,” Mary Beth Alphin said of her father, an aircraft mechanic and inspector who founded Alphin Aircraft. “He wanted us to share his love of flying,” Mary Beth said. “He was fortunate that his vocation was his avocation.
NEWS
April 9, 2004
The Hagerstown City Council is considering licensing and regulating taxi and transit services after receiving complaints from citizens, city officials said this week. The services are currently regulated by the Maryland Public Service Commission, which uses field inspectors to investigate complaints. Cuts in the number of statewide inspectors have raised concerns about whether the commission can provide adequate oversight. The possibility of the city taking over the responsibility was discussed at Tuesday's council meeting.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | May 3, 2005
gregs@herald-mail.com The Hagerstown Office of Code Compliance plans to begin a new enforcement drive this month involving a group of about 40 rental housing properties, the city's chief inspector said. Chief Code Compliance Officer John Lestitian said property owners could face fines of $200 to $1,000 for each violation. Each day the property is considered to be in violation, the city could levy additional fines. "Our goal's not to fine people. Our goal is to improve the properties and make sure the properties are properly maintained," Lestitian said.
NEWS
November 12, 2007
A one-day seminar, titled: "Geosynthetic Best Management Practices for Stormwater Management," designed for engineers, planners, contractors, inspectors and watershed association staff, will be Tuesday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Garrett College. This session, presented by the University of Maryland's T2 Center, will offer insight into sediment control and erosion prevention, runoff control and site stabilization. To register, call 301-387-3069.
NEWS
By ERIN JULIUS | December 9, 2009
HAGERSTOWN -- City residents are responsible for clearing sidewalks after snow and ice events in the winter -- a responsibility that is really a public safety issue, said John Lestitian, chief code compliance officer for the City of Hagerstown. The city's policy regarding removal of snow from sidewalks was reviewed Tuesday during a Hagerstown City Council meeting. City code inspectors are sent out to monitor whether people clear their sidewalks within an appropriate amount of time after precipitation stops.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | June 23, 2009
WASHINGTON COUNTY -- Washington County's liquor board has fined a Hagerstown nightclub $1,500 for allegedly violating state restrictions on nudity or sexual simulations. The fine, which must be paid by July 18, was imposed on Hager Hall Conference and Event Center on Dual Highway, where a male revue danced April 25. The Washington County Board of License Commissioners, known as the liquor board, can impose fines and suspend or revoke a liquor license. Hager Hall can appeal the liquor board's decision to Washington County Circuit Court.
NEWS
March 1, 2000
By ANDREW SCHOTZ / Staff Writer, Martinsburg photo: JOE CROCETTA / staff photographer MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Jim Crowley flipped the glass beaker over. With no water and no sediment, the gasoline sample passed. Then, Crowley, a weights and measures inspector with the state of West Virginia, tested the octane. The machine in the metal case in the back of his Jeep read "86.8," within the acceptable range for 87 octane gas. West Virginia fuel inspectors met with two Israeli citizens at a Texaco station on King Street near Interstate 81 on Wednesday to teach them about the state's regulatory process.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | October 12, 2006
SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. - U.S. Postal inspectors believe the Shepherdstown Post Office was broken into Tuesday night or Wednesday morning, forcing the building at the intersection of Washington and King streets to close for several hours Wednesday while investigators worked at the scene, a U.S. Postal official said. Police said the break-in likely is related to three similar incidents that occurred overnight Tuesday. Workers at the post office noticed that the building had been broken into when they arrived at work Wednesday about 6 a.m. , said U.S. Postal inspector Bruce Hammerle, who would not say where in the building the entry occurred.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | June 17, 2009
HAGERSTOWN -- Washington County's liquor board is considering whether regulations covering adult entertainment, attire and lewd behavior were violated at a recent male dance revue show in Hagerstown. A hearing held Wednesday examined an April 25 show at Hager Hall Conference and Event Center on Dual Highway -- including an act of simulated sex, which authorities said might violate terms of the establishment's liquor license. The show was billed and described as a Chippendales performance, although a Chippendales agent said his organization wasn't involved.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | July 3, 2012
The Hagerstown Suns have been fined $3,500 in connection with the death of an 18-year-old Smithsburg man who fell off a vehicle and struck his head at Municipal Stadium in April, according to documents released Tuesday by the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation. In addition, the Suns were fined $5,600 for other violations that inspectors found at the stadium as they investigated the death of Mitchell Akers. Ten of the 20 violations issued were deemed serious.
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NEWS
By JANET HEIM | janeth@herald-mail.com | February 13, 2012
Richard "Rich" Gaver has lived in Funkstown his entire life. Many in the community know him for the work he does on the Funkstown Town Council and for his involvement with the town's Olde Tyme Christmas and Day in the Park. He admits he likes to keep busy and isn't one to sit around. That's why Gaver likes his work as an inspector for Washington County. “It's different every day because every job is different,” Gaver said. Gaver, 51, has worked in the electrical field since he was 16. Before taking a job with Washington County 15 years ago, he worked as a master electrician, getting his start in the field from the former Washington County Vo-Tech, graduating in 1978.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | heather.keels@herald-mail.com | September 28, 2011
Citing a declining workload as construction activity has slowed, the Washington County Board of Commissioners opted Tuesday not to fill vacant positions for a code inspector and a construction inspector. The rejection by the board came despite arguments by Division of Public Works officials that the employees are needed and a warning from County Administrator Gregory B. Murray that overscheduled inspectors could lead to project delays or, worse, overlooked safety hazards. The five commissioners were divided on how to handle the vacancies.
NEWS
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | August 27, 2011
Small whistles can make big noises. They sound the alarm on conduct of illegality, fraud, waste or abuse. They can challenge power. And they can prevent future debacles. Many government workers feel they are doing their patriotic duty by bringing attention to wrongdoing. But such disclosures can put a target on a whistleblower's back, leading them into the perilous world of retaliation. They are sometimes smeared as traitors, turncoats and liars by their superiors and suffer harassment, punishment or firing.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthewu@herald-mail.com | February 5, 2011
Electrical code inspectors who wish to do inspection work on behalf of Berkeley County's planning, engineering and land use department must submit required documentation by March 4. In a unanimous vote Thursday, the Berkeley County Council approved a list of qualifications that inspectors must annually provide to the county in order to perform electrical inspections. The requirements include West Virginia Fire Marshal certification, an "errors and omissions" insurance policy with coverage of at least $1 million, and state business and contractor's licenses.
NEWS
January 14, 2011
Electrical inspections MARTINSBURG, W.Va. — The Berkeley County Council Thursday reversed course on how electrical inspections will be conducted, ending an arrangement the county had with one company to provide the service. In a 4-1 vote, council members decided to allow any state-qualified electrical inspector to submit his or her qualifications to the county if interested in providing the service. The county's exclusive agreement with Middle Department Inspection Agency, which was in effect for little more than a year, now is set to expire on March 15. The Berkeley County Department of Land Use Planning and Engineering does not have paid electrical inspectors on its staff.
OBITUARIES
By JANET HEIM | janeth@herald-mail.com | December 10, 2010
Raised on a farm with a strong work ethic and a knack for all things mechanical, Thurman Sizer “T.S.” Alphin was known for working with his hands and rarely being idle. He also developed a love of airplanes. “He loved fixing things,” Mary Beth Alphin said of her father, an aircraft mechanic and inspector who founded Alphin Aircraft. “He wanted us to share his love of flying,” Mary Beth said. “He was fortunate that his vocation was his avocation.
NEWS
September 16, 2010
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. -- A Berkeley County building inspector was terminated Thursday by the Berkeley County Commission because she failed to obtain required certification within a two-year period as mandated by state law. Commissioners made the termination of Deborah A. Carrasquillo effective on Sept. 30. The Berkeley County Commission voted to hire Carrasquillo in July 2008, according to meeting minutes.
NEWS
By ERIN JULIUS | December 9, 2009
HAGERSTOWN -- City residents are responsible for clearing sidewalks after snow and ice events in the winter -- a responsibility that is really a public safety issue, said John Lestitian, chief code compliance officer for the City of Hagerstown. The city's policy regarding removal of snow from sidewalks was reviewed Tuesday during a Hagerstown City Council meeting. City code inspectors are sent out to monitor whether people clear their sidewalks within an appropriate amount of time after precipitation stops.
NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER AND JENNIFER FITCH | November 18, 2009
WAYNESBORO, PA. -- "Freedom of choice. " That is what one member of the Waynesboro Borough Council said Wednesday he wants to give residents in need of building code and inspection services. Councilman Ronnie Martin, who represents Ward 1 homes east of Church Street, asked the council to consider contracting with a second building inspection service. Residents from across Franklin County spoke in favor of the current contractor, Accredited Services Inc. of Waynesboro, prompting the council to table the issue for further information.
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