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LIFESTYLE
RANSON, W.Va | May 20, 2013
The Potomac Valley Audubon Society will offer a special streamside insect walk for families with young children on Saturday, June 8. The event, entitled “Up the Creek,” will be held in Ranson's Flowing Springs Park from 9 a.m. to noon. The insect walk is for families with children ages 6 to 9. It will provide youngsters and their parents with a fun opportunity to learn about insects that live in and around streams in the area. Insect nets, magnifying glasses and wading boots will be provided.
NEWS
by BOB KESSLER | May 30, 2006
Most people use IPM information when they farm and garden, but might not know it or understand it. Very simply, it is a process of using the least toxic way to handle a disease or insect problem on the farm or in your yard. It uses physical (pick off the bugs), biological (encouraging beneficials) and chemical tactics (using the least toxic chemicals) that are safe to the user and to the environment, and have the lowest cost. Most IPM tactics are based on the farmers, turf grass managers, fruit growers and homeowners to have up-to-date information on what problems might be happening.
NEWS
August 28, 2007
The Washington County Master Gardeners will hold a free plant clinic on Saturday, from 8 a.m. to noon at the City Farmers Market at 25 W. Church St. in Hagerstown. Plant clinics answer gardening questions. Visitors are encouraged to bring plant or insect samples or gardening questions. Master Gardeners are trained volunteer educators who teach people how to use safe, effective gardening practices to build healthy gardens and communities.
NEWS
January 24, 2006
ANNAPOLIS - An unusual insect has been designated Maryland's "Invader of the Month" - not because it's been seen here yet, but because it hasn't. The Sirex noctilio, a wood boring wasp new to the United States was identified last February by Dr. Richard Hoebeke after it was collected in a September 2004 forest survey trap sample from Fulton, N.Y. The wasp is known to be a serious pest in South America, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa, attacking and infecting pine forests, the Maryland Department of Agriculture said last week.
NEWS
August 28, 2008
Fall film festival Shepherdstown Film Society kicks off its fall season with "Persepolis," a 2007 coming-of-age film nominated for an Academy Award for best animated feature film. 7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 29, in Shepherd University's Reynolds Hall. Discussion follows movie. Go to www.shepherdstownfilmsociety.org . Spud Fest Children help harvest potatoes the old-fashioned way, then snack on homemade potato chips. Starts at 10 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 30, at Washington County Rural Heritage Museum.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | June 14, 2008
HAGERSTOWN - Libraries in Washington County will be buggin' children all summer long - but the youngsters probably aren't going to mind. And insect repellent won't be necessary. "Catch the Reading Bug" kicked off Friday at the main branch of the Washington County Free Library at 100 S. Potomac St. Many of the county's branch libraries will be participating. Jeff Ridgeway, head of children's services, said the library has been sponsoring summer reading programs since the 1930s.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | June 13, 2008
HAGERSTOWN -- Libraries in Washington County will be buggin' children all summer long - but the youngsters probably aren't going to mind. And insect repellent won't be necessary. "Catch the Reading Bug" kicked off Friday at the main branch of the Washington County Free Library at 100 S. Potomac St. Many of the county's branch libraries will be participating. Jeff Ridgeway, head of children's services, said the library has been sponsoring summer reading programs since the 1930s.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | September 6, 2011
It was Tracy Leskey's "bug zoo" when she was a kid that turned the nationally recognized expert on brown marmorated stink bugs to a lifelong study of insects. Today, Leskey, 42, is a research entomologist who works at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Appalachian Fruit Research Station on Wiltshire Road. Her interest in bugs piqued when she was 4 years old and collected fireflies in her bug zoo, a store-bought, clear plastic kid's toy that held her daily collections, Leskey said.
NEWS
March 10, 2009
March 12, 19 and 26 - Beginning Beekeeping course, Franklin County Beekeepers, Franklin County Extension Office, 181 Franklin Farm Lane, Chambersburg, Pa. Call 717-263-9226. March 14 and 21 - Backyard fruit tree workshop, hands-on pruning, and insect and disease identification and control, Fulton Center for Sustainable Living (Wilson College), 9 a.m. to noon. Call 717-263-9226 to register. March 16 - 4-H Pig Club reorganization meeting, Ag Heritage Center, 185 Franklin Farm Lane, Chambersburg 7:30 p.m. March 17 - Economics of conservation tillage workshop, Franklin County Conservation District, 185 Franklin Farm Lane, Chambersburg, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Call 717-264-5499, ext. 104, to register.
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LIFESTYLE
RANSON, W.Va | May 20, 2013
The Potomac Valley Audubon Society will offer a special streamside insect walk for families with young children on Saturday, June 8. The event, entitled “Up the Creek,” will be held in Ranson's Flowing Springs Park from 9 a.m. to noon. The insect walk is for families with children ages 6 to 9. It will provide youngsters and their parents with a fun opportunity to learn about insects that live in and around streams in the area. Insect nets, magnifying glasses and wading boots will be provided.
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NEWS
March 7, 2013
On Thursday, March 14, at the Cumberland Woodland Owners Association meeting, Sharon Coons and Nathan Fite, foresters with the Pennsylvania bureau of forestry, will talk about diseases and insect pests threatening Pennsylvania forests. Information for woodland owners on identification and methods for controlling forest insect pests such as Gypsy Moth, Hemlock Wooly Adelgid, Emerald Ash Borer, Tent Caterpillars, Scale Insects, and Weevils will be presented. The meeting will be at 7 p.m., at the Penn State Extension office, 181 Franklin Farm Lane in Chambersburg.
NEWS
June 29, 2012
(AP) - Maryland is using insects to fight invasive species. The State Highway Administration said Friday that it is using a weevil and a beetle that feed only on invasive species harming native plants in wetlands and along roadways. The weevil feeds on the mile-a-minute vine, an Asian import that grows on shrubs, trees and other plants, blocking out sunlight and killing them. The beetle feeds on purple loosestrife, which can form thick stands, crowding out native plants and altering wetlands water flow.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | September 6, 2011
It was Tracy Leskey's "bug zoo" when she was a kid that turned the nationally recognized expert on brown marmorated stink bugs to a lifelong study of insects. Today, Leskey, 42, is a research entomologist who works at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Appalachian Fruit Research Station on Wiltshire Road. Her interest in bugs piqued when she was 4 years old and collected fireflies in her bug zoo, a store-bought, clear plastic kid's toy that held her daily collections, Leskey said.
LIFESTYLE
BY TIFFANY ARNOLD | tiffanya@herald-mail.com | February 18, 2011
Teresa Bryson earned the title of 2011 American Honey Queen by staying busy as a bee. "Honey bees pollinate almost one third of all our food," said Bryson, who lives near Clay Hill, Pa., south of Chambersburg. "It's very important that we educate the public about the importance of honey bees and get the message out there that we need the honey bees for our food. " The American Beekeeping Federation crowned Bryson as the 2011 American Honey Queen in January, during the North American Beekeeping Conference & Tradeshow in Texas.
NEWS
By NATALIE BRANDON / Special to The Herald-Mail | July 20, 2009
Sunburn, bee stings, poison ivy -- Oh, my! With summer in full swing, some common and irritating woes can put a damper on good times. Dr. Bhuvasa Raja, director of Urgent Care for Washington County Hospital, offers her advice on how to prevent and treat these summertime blues. Sunburn "Sunburn is the most common condition we see, as far as summer-related cases go," Raja says. "We also see many cases of poison ivy and bug bites, especially in children. " Sunburn makes skin red, dry, itchy and sensitive to sunlight and heat.
NEWS
By CRYSTAL SCHELLE | April 20, 2009
David McMullan says he knows better than to enter a hotel room and drop his suitcase on the bed. As the district manager for JC Ehrlich Pest Control for the Quad State region, McMullan is consciously aware that there might be some uninvited roommates waiting for him. "I don't even take my luggage inside," he said. "I sit it outside and go inside the room to inspect it. " What McMullan is looking for are bed bugs, the blood-sucking insect that lately has been pushed back into the spotlight.
NEWS
March 10, 2009
March 12, 19 and 26 - Beginning Beekeeping course, Franklin County Beekeepers, Franklin County Extension Office, 181 Franklin Farm Lane, Chambersburg, Pa. Call 717-263-9226. March 14 and 21 - Backyard fruit tree workshop, hands-on pruning, and insect and disease identification and control, Fulton Center for Sustainable Living (Wilson College), 9 a.m. to noon. Call 717-263-9226 to register. March 16 - 4-H Pig Club reorganization meeting, Ag Heritage Center, 185 Franklin Farm Lane, Chambersburg 7:30 p.m. March 17 - Economics of conservation tillage workshop, Franklin County Conservation District, 185 Franklin Farm Lane, Chambersburg, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Call 717-264-5499, ext. 104, to register.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | November 2, 2008
Tri-State-area photographers captured three praying mantises and some other critters, including a stick bug. With the season changing, new photographic possibilities will crop up. We've seen plenty of sunsets, sunrises, bees and praying mantises, so if you photograph something distinctive, we'd love to see it. The Herald-Mail runs readers' best recent photographs, taken in the Tri-State area, on this page. Quality is key. Sharp, large, color images look best. Close-up photos show detail better.
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