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NEWS
April 24, 2010
NEW YORK (AP) - Kate and Laura Mulleavy, the sister team behind the label Rodarte, are the reigning queens of the fashion scene, with a white-hot runway reputation, industry accolades and red-carpet fans. You wouldn't know it to talk to them, though. The sisters are about as low key as you can get. They live and work in Pasadena, Calif., far away from the politics and personalities of the industry. And that, says Laura, gives them a freedom they likely wouldn't have if they were based here in one of the world's fashion capitals.
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NEWS
April 22, 2007
Editor's note: On Tuesday, Chambersburg Area School District Superintendent Joseph Padasak sat down with Herald-Mail reporter Don Aines for a question-and-answer session. Following is the transcript, edited for length, of that session. Q: What's your vision for the Franklin County Career & Technology Center in the next five to seven years? Who should own it and run it, how will building be expanded or changed? Padasak: ... All six districts should have a say in how the thing is run, and they all should have some form of monetary ties to it, but the reality is, several of them told us they don't have the money to put into any capital improvements, so it looks like we're going to do the lion's share of capital improvements in that part of it. Now, the operations part, I still think that everyone should have a say in it, and it should be for all children (in the county)
NEWS
April 27, 1997
For the past few months the mail deliveries that come to my home have brought a large assortment of brochures, catalogs and fliers from colleges around the country, all hoping that my son the honor student will pick them. I am proud, but a little bit sad at the same time. I'm proud because my son works hard to perform well, harder than I ever did at his age. I'm also sad because I know that when he goes on to college, I'll hear myself echoing the lament I've heard from so many other parents over the years.
NEWS
by PAT SCHOOLEY | September 16, 2007
This look at Foltz Mfg. & Industrial Supply Co. isthe 166th in a series of articles about the historical and architectural treasures of Washington County The commercial building at the corner of East Washington and Locust streets covers the entire 240-foot-by-40-foot lot, ending at Matthew Avenue on the south. Its three-story front block faces Washington with four bays and an entrance that angles across the corner. Sashes have single panes of glass set in openings topped by limestone lintels.
NEWS
By TIM ROWLAND | March 19, 2009
We're all aware of the great grocery downsizing scam that's taking center stage at your local supermarket. But strangely enough, I'm not mad about that. I've always admired creative thinking, and for that reason alone I have to stand up and applaud the consumer-product packing divisions across this great land of ours. First, this isn't new. Vending machine candy bars were way ahead of the curve, and they were pretty slick about it. They'd say, "Hey, we're lowering the price on Snickers.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | March 18, 2003
pepperb@herald-mail.com Sparks form metal and job opportunities at the Washington County Public School System's Manufacturing Academy at Williamsport High School. In Williamsport High teacher Jim Prelog's Manufacturing Academy class, students cut, weld and shape everything from levels to car safety stands. He said the academy's three students have an advantage over many of their peers because they have the option of joining either the manufacturing work force or attending college after getting their high school diplomas.
NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | September 12, 2009
Big night for Mike GREENCASTLE, Pa. -- Every year, the Franklin County Area Development Corp. (FCADC) honors industries in the county with a dose of good old-fashioned fun at its Industry Appreciation Dinner. The FCADC has been a champion of enterprise in Franklin County since its inception in 1960 by working to encourage existing businesses while also welcoming new entrepreneurs to the area. "We thought it was important to recognize both the small and large companies that do truly outstanding work, those that enjoy not just success as a business, but that contribute to the community as well," said L. Michael Ross, president of the FCADC.
NEWS
By PAT SCHOOLEY | January 13, 2008
A dilapidated complex of buildings sat on the on the south side of Harpers Ferry Road near the four-arch stone Antietam Iron Works Bridge. Wayne McCrossin, then a resident of Westminster, Md., saw the buildings for the first time on his way to visit relatives in the early 1980s. McCrossin said to himself, "I should fix that place up. " He continued to say that each time he drove by the site by for the next 17 years. Finally he made an offer, and, in 1999, became the owner of part of the old Antietam Furnace.
NEWS
by ANDREW SCHOTZ | July 14, 2002
martinsburg@herald-mail.com Most of the customers at the nightclub were men. Most of the women were naked. Women seductively shed their clothes to thumping music, stepping and whirling on a long runway stage - they were the show. A mostly male audience drank it in with their eyes and with help from the bar. A spring Saturday night was flowing into Sunday morning in Berkeley County, W.Va., where strip bars draw cheers from customers and jeers from government officials who want to stop them from spreading.
NEWS
by MARIE GILBERT/Staff Writer | May 6, 2005
It didn't take more than a few minutes for Shenae Barnett and Joyce Norris to discover they had a lot in common. Several years ago, both women felt they had no future. They were unemployed, unskilled and lacking self-confidence. "I felt boxed in," Barnett said. "I felt limited in what I could do with my life. " Turning to Horizon Goodwill Industries for guidance, the two women took the first step in turning their lives around. They participated in a job training program, found the support they needed to stay focused and became success stories.
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