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Incinerator

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NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | August 31, 2010
Washington County could send some of its garbage for incineration in a regional waste-to-energy facility under development in Frederick County, officials from both counties have said. The Washington County Commissioners voted unanimously last week to send a letter to Frederick County expressing their interest in a potential partnership. Frederick and Carroll counties are funding the construction of the 1,500 ton-per-day waste-to-energy facility, commonly known as an incinerator, which will be owned by the Northeast Maryland Waste Disposal Authority.
NEWS
March 12, 2009
ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) -- A state senator is redoubling his efforts to block construction of a large-scale trash incinerator near Frederick. Alex X. Mooney, R-Frederick/Washington, introduced a bill in the General Assembly on Wednesday that would limit such projects to land zoned for heavy industry more than three miles from homes, churches, parks or hospitals. Last month, Mooney sponsored a bill to prohibit incinerators within a mile of national parks. Both measures are aimed at blocking a $527 million incinerator that Frederick and Carroll counties are considering building near the Monocacy National Battlefield to conserve landfill space and generate electricity.
NEWS
By Joe Lane | August 31, 2008
Here we go again. Recently the Washington County Commissioners voted to give $75,000 to a consultant (lobbyist?) who will tell us that a garbage incinerator is the solution to our landfill problems. Not just any garbage incinerator, but a "waste to energy" incinerator. Throw in your trash and out comes free energy. It sounds too good to be true because it is too good to be true. One of these facilities will require tens or even hundreds of millions of tax dollars to build.
NEWS
BY ANDREW SCHOTZ | April 8, 2002
andrews@herald-mail.com What happened at a human crematory in Georgia wouldn't happen here, Tri-State regulatory officials said. Authorities have found more than 330 uncremated remains that had been stacked near the Tri-State Crematory in Noble, Ga., for many years. Crematory operator Ray Brent Marsh allegedly told investigators the incinerator was not working properly, but a later inspection showed that wasn't true, according to published reports. Marsh has been charged with over 230 counts of theft by deception.
NEWS
by DON AINES | November 19, 2003
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - A plan to create a health-care service and institutional zones in the area of Chambersburg Hospital is likely to get some additional fine-tuning before the Chambersburg Borough Council schedules a public hearing early next year. The council discussed the hospital's proposal Tuesday night and will do so again next Tuesday before scheduling a public hearing, probably sometime in January. The borough's Planning and Zoning Commission voted unanimously Nov. 4 to recommend that the council amend the zoning ordinance to create the two zones, according to Borough Planner Gary Norris.
NEWS
By TIM ROWLAND | July 8, 2008
Never can I recall a news cycle where the headlines have been so dedicated to the subject of road kill. At least not since the West Virginia legislature legalized the consumption of it. Remember when we laughed at that one? Well, look who's laughing now. West Virginia's grill2grill approach to flattened woodchucks might have seemed unappealing at the time, but give the state credit for dealing with a problem before it became a crisis. Which it has in Maryland, where critter corpses are piling up along the roadside faster than at Bloody Lane.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | March 30, 2000
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Counties across the Tri-State area are facing the unusual dilemma of how to dispose of the bodies of stray animals that have been euthanized. cont. from front page Valley Proteins has notified municipalities that after this week it will no longer collect the bodies and take them to its rendering plant in Winchester, Va. Animal control officials in the Eastern Panhandle said they've had little time to come up with alternatives. "Somebody has to do something with these animals," said Berkeley County Animal Control Officer Ray Strine.
NEWS
by ANDREW SCHOTZ | September 10, 2003
andrews@herald-mail.com The Hagerstown-Washington County Economic Development Commission on Tuesday again lobbied the city government to stop fighting Washington County Hospital's move to Robinwood Drive. EDC Chairwoman Peggy Bushey said the city should make the hospital relocation "a very positive change" and consider the property left behind as "a true revenue source. " Councilmen Kristin Aleshire and Lewis Metzner said the city is not fighting the move, but rather raising legitimate logistical questions.
NEWS
February 26, 1998
Police log Store opens despite blaze CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - A fire early Wednesday at a supermarket failed to keep the business from opening on time. Franklin Fire Co. Assistant Fire Chief Gary Himes said the fire was reported at 5:40 a.m. when employees at Sunnyway Food smelled smoke coming from the incinerator room. The incinerator is in a concrete block room attached to the back of the store at 49 Warm Spring Road in Hamilton Township. Himes said the employees kept the steel door to the room closed, "which definitely kept it from spreading.
NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | November 19, 2002
And now the moment we've all been waiting for, the suspenseful moment of truth when Washington County Health System announces the location for its new hospital. And the winner is... DOWNTOWN HAGERSTOWN!! Yea! What a great day for the city, what a wonderful chance to rejuvenate the urban core, how marvelous will it be for ... how's that? Oh sorry, that was a misprint. Seems the hospital is moving out to the Robinwood Medical Center. Boy, there's a shock. Confirmation of news even the cows in the pasture have known for the past decade.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | January 25, 2011
About 20 area residents Tuesday night heard a litany of reasons why they should oppose a proposed incinerator in Frederick County that would turn garbage into energy. Members of the Boonsboro Recycling Task Force invited Ellis Burruss, the leader of WasteNot! Frederick, a loosely organized citizens group opposed to the incinerator project, to offer his views. Frederick County officials have been considering building the "waste-to-energy" incinerator since 2005, Burruss said. Officials in Carroll and Frederick counties have an agreement with the Northeast Maryland Waste Disposal Authority to develop the facility.
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NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | heather.keels@herald-mail.com | January 24, 2011
Frederick County, Md., might soon be in need of a new partner to help fund its more than $300 million incinerator project, and local community activists worry that partner could end up being Washington County. “Our understanding is that the new commissioners elected in Carroll County are disinclined to go along with the incinerator project, and so there’s a possibility that Washington County would be approached to join in the project,” said Ellis Burruss of WasteNot!
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | August 31, 2010
Washington County could send some of its garbage for incineration in a regional waste-to-energy facility under development in Frederick County, officials from both counties have said. The Washington County Commissioners voted unanimously last week to send a letter to Frederick County expressing their interest in a potential partnership. Frederick and Carroll counties are funding the construction of the 1,500 ton-per-day waste-to-energy facility, commonly known as an incinerator, which will be owned by the Northeast Maryland Waste Disposal Authority.
NEWS
April 28, 2009
FREDERICK, Md. (AP) -- The Frederick County Commissioners have voted to suspend the bidding process for a large trash incinerator amid growing opposition to the $527 million project. The 4-1 vote effectively kills the project after more than two years of planning and studies. The incinerator was planned for an industrial park just south of Frederick along the Monocacy River near the Monocacy Civil War battlefield. Supporters had hoped to conserve landfill space and generate electricity by burning garbage from Frederick and Carroll counties.
NEWS
April 7, 2009
FREDERICK, Md. (AP) -- A state Senate committee has rejected a bill that would have blocked construction of a proposed trash incinerator near a Civil War battlefield just south of Frederick. The action effectively kills an effort by local Republican Sen. Alex Mooney to prevent Frederick County from building a $527 million incinerator in an industrial park near the Monocacy National Battlefield. The incinerator would burn trash from Frederick and Carroll counties to generate electricity and conserve landfill space.
NEWS
March 12, 2009
ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) -- A state senator is redoubling his efforts to block construction of a large-scale trash incinerator near Frederick. Alex X. Mooney, R-Frederick/Washington, introduced a bill in the General Assembly on Wednesday that would limit such projects to land zoned for heavy industry more than three miles from homes, churches, parks or hospitals. Last month, Mooney sponsored a bill to prohibit incinerators within a mile of national parks. Both measures are aimed at blocking a $527 million incinerator that Frederick and Carroll counties are considering building near the Monocacy National Battlefield to conserve landfill space and generate electricity.
NEWS
By Joe Lane | August 31, 2008
Here we go again. Recently the Washington County Commissioners voted to give $75,000 to a consultant (lobbyist?) who will tell us that a garbage incinerator is the solution to our landfill problems. Not just any garbage incinerator, but a "waste to energy" incinerator. Throw in your trash and out comes free energy. It sounds too good to be true because it is too good to be true. One of these facilities will require tens or even hundreds of millions of tax dollars to build.
NEWS
By TIM ROWLAND | July 8, 2008
Never can I recall a news cycle where the headlines have been so dedicated to the subject of road kill. At least not since the West Virginia legislature legalized the consumption of it. Remember when we laughed at that one? Well, look who's laughing now. West Virginia's grill2grill approach to flattened woodchucks might have seemed unappealing at the time, but give the state credit for dealing with a problem before it became a crisis. Which it has in Maryland, where critter corpses are piling up along the roadside faster than at Bloody Lane.
NEWS
by DON AINES | November 19, 2003
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - A plan to create a health-care service and institutional zones in the area of Chambersburg Hospital is likely to get some additional fine-tuning before the Chambersburg Borough Council schedules a public hearing early next year. The council discussed the hospital's proposal Tuesday night and will do so again next Tuesday before scheduling a public hearing, probably sometime in January. The borough's Planning and Zoning Commission voted unanimously Nov. 4 to recommend that the council amend the zoning ordinance to create the two zones, according to Borough Planner Gary Norris.
NEWS
by ANDREW SCHOTZ | September 10, 2003
andrews@herald-mail.com The Hagerstown-Washington County Economic Development Commission on Tuesday again lobbied the city government to stop fighting Washington County Hospital's move to Robinwood Drive. EDC Chairwoman Peggy Bushey said the city should make the hospital relocation "a very positive change" and consider the property left behind as "a true revenue source. " Councilmen Kristin Aleshire and Lewis Metzner said the city is not fighting the move, but rather raising legitimate logistical questions.
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