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Impact Fees

NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | March 30, 2011
The Washington Township (Pa.) Supervisors are thinking about replacing their traffic impact fees to accommodate a scaled-back plan for a relief route designed north of Waynesboro. On Wednesday, the supervisors discussed throwing out their current ordinance, using a $1,000 fee set by Pennsylvania statute, and working with a consultant to establish a replacement fee. They decided to discuss it further at their Monday meeting, which starts at 7 p.m. in the township offices off Welty Road.
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NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | April 15, 2010
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. -- The West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals on Thursday granted a stay requested by Berkeley County public water and sewer districts in their legal battle with developer Larry V. Faircloth. The utilities requested the stay pending their high court appeal of a judge's declaratory judgment that deemed the utilities' collection of capacity improvement fees to be illegal. A stay typically suspends a judicial proceeding from continuing. Since ruling against the utilities in an order signed Jan. 29, former state Supreme Court justice Elliott E. "Spike" Maynard removed himself from the case and filed candidacy papers to run for Congress in the 1st District in southern West Virginia.
NEWS
October 20, 2009
Editor's note: The Herald-Mail invites readers to answer poll questions on www.herald-mail.com. Readers also may submit comments when voting. A sampling of edited reader comments will run on The Herald-Mail's Opinion page on Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday. The question posted Oct. 15 was: Do you agree with Washington County's short-term "stimulus" plan -- which combines an excise tax credit, a permit fee reduction and a recordation tax break-- to encourage residential construction and make homes more affordable?
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | May 9, 2009
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. -- Jefferson County is building two new elementary schools and adding to a third. Thanks to impact fees on new houses, the schools won't cost local taxpayers one dime. School leaders asked the Jefferson County Commission Thursday to approve a deal in which the developer of the proposed Breckenridge subdivision on Job Corps Road will do $681,000 worth of site work for a new elementary school to be built there in lieu of paying impact fees on 60 homes. The agreement, which received the commission's blessing, means the state School Building Authority, which pays for new school construction, will agree to the Jefferson County School Board's request for $6 million toward the $9 million needed to build the new 500-student school.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | March 27, 2009
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. -- Jefferson County's IT specialist has sued Commissioner Patricia A. "Patsy" Noland, claiming she said disparaging things about his professional abilities and implying he was incompetent earlier this month on a Yahoo! Groups forum Web site. A complaint filed Thursday by attorney Harry P. Waddell on behalf of George Privitera, the county's IT specialist, claims Noland acted with "malice, reckless disregard for the truth and/or negligence in publishing ... false defamatory statements" on "OJ -- An Open Forum for Jefferson County, WV" on March 11. Noland said Friday she had not talked with an attorney since being notified of the libel complaint filed against her and declined to discuss what was alleged.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | February 25, 2009
WAYNESBORO, Pa. -- In 2006, Washington Township was leading the growth boom in Franklin County, Pa., with construction of 142 living units started during the 12-month period. In 2008, that number was cut nearly in half, with 74 units started in what the township manager identified as a year reminiscent of those before the housing bubble. Although the township budget has been based on average years, rather than extraordinary ones like 2006, the revenue funds that carry over every year are diminishing.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE, Special to The Herald-Mail | February 5, 2009
CHARLES TOWN, W.VA. -- It's been four years since Jefferson County implemented the first impact fee ordinance in West Virginia. The Jefferson County Commission learned Thursday morning that it has paid off. F. Mark Schiavone, director of the county's impact fee program, told the five board members the county is $12.5 million richer than it was before the fees took effect. The first one, paid by a developer in January 2004, bought a new cruiser for the Jefferson County Sheriff's Department, Schiavone said.
NEWS
October 22, 2008
RANSON, W.Va. - Ranson City Council members Tuesday night decided to stop funding about six local agencies over a recent circuit court ruling on Jefferson County's impact fees. Impact fees are fees collected from developers to help pay for services demanded by growth and the Jefferson County Commission passed impact fees to help fund schools, parks and recreation, fire and emergency services and law enforcement. But Ranson city officials do not believe the fees apply to cities and they initially withheld some school money collected in the city.
NEWS
By DAVE MCMILLION | October 20, 2008
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. -- Two Jefferson County Commission candidates who have deep concerns about the direction of Jefferson County government will square off in the Nov. 4 general election. Democrat Patricia A. "Patsy" Noland and Republican Frank Kubic are competing for the Kabletown district seat on the commission. Commissioner Rusty Morgan currently holds the position but is not running for re-election. The seat pays $30,800 a year, has a six-year term and all county voters can cast ballots in the race.
NEWS
By DAVE MCMILLION | October 15, 2008
SHENANDOAH JUNCTION, W.Va. - When Jefferson County Commission candidate Paul Ashbaugh was asked Tuesday night to comment on protecting the county's rural landscape and how he would address light pollution at night, he got suspicious. "I don't know who came up with that idea," Ashbaugh said, referring to the notion that there was a problem with too much lighting in the county. "Must have been a no-growther," Ashbaugh said as he also took a parting shot at the Jefferson County Commission's recent decision to pass a law controlling excessive dog barking in the county.
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