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Impact Fees

NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | September 5, 2003
charlestown@herald-mail.com CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - The president of the Jefferson County Board of Education emphasized the need for school impact fees and how they fit into a bigger plan for paying for a $35 million high school in the county during a Jefferson County Commission meeting Thursday night. Board of Education President Lori Stilley said there are important reasons to pass impact fees quickly although the director of the state School Building Authority has said impact fees will not be considered by his agency to help secure money from the authority to build a second high school.
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NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | December 10, 2003
charlestown@herald-mail.com Saying impact fees are a "bad, bad way" to collect money for new schools in Jefferson County, a local businessman is trying to collect enough signatures to put the issue up for a county-wide vote. Under the state law that allows impact fees, 15 percent of the county's registered voters can petition the Jefferson County Commission to put the issue up for a referendum. The commissioners, who passed impact fees Nov. 24, have said 15 percent of Jefferson County's voters equals about 3,667 people.
NEWS
By SCOTT BUTKI | February 9, 1999
A report paid for by the Washington County Commissioners recommends imposing school impact fees on new developments in every Washington County high school district except Hancock. [cont. from front page ] The commissioners are scheduled to hear a presentation at a meeting today on the five-part written study by Tischler and Associates, Inc. of Bethesda, Md. The report suggests imposing a fee on new developments in the Clear Spring, Williamsport, North Hagerstown, South Hagerstown, Boonsboro and Smithsburg high school districts.
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSLEY | September 9, 2005
martinsburg@herald-mail.com CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - The Jefferson County Commission voted Thursday to let someone else decide whether the developer for a housing community designed solely for residents 55 years old and older must pay school impact fees. Given that children are prohibited from living in the community named Four Seasons, Greenvest CEO Jim Duszynski said he should not have to pay impact fees for the 800 or so homes planned for the community, which is part of Huntfield.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION, Charles Town | March 2, 2000
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - The Jefferson County Commissioners took their first step Thursday night toward complying with the Local Powers Act, a lengthy and complex state law that gives the commissioners the authority to implement impact fees. The fees, charged to developers when they build new homes, could help the county offset the costs that come with population growth, including schools, sewer lines and such services as police and fire protection. Commissioner Al Hooper volunteered to meet with home builders in the county to determine what they would like building codes to include.
NEWS
By ASHLEY HARTMAN | January 23, 2008
GREENCASTLE, Pa. - The Antrim Township Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday to move forward with the next step in a study to implement transportation impact fees in the township. The supervisors agreed that a transportation impact fee study should be completed for the area of phase two of the Grindstone Hill Extension project, a connector road that eventually will connect Pa. 16 and U.S. 11 at Interstate 81 near Exit 3. "I'm at the limit of what taxpayers should pay for this road," said Supervisor James Byers, who previously said he was worried that transportation impact fees would hurt small businesses.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | December 17, 2007
WAYNESBORO, Pa. - The Washington Township Supervisors are expected to lend consideration tonight to a development company's request for the return of impact fees. In most new township housing developments, those fees are assessed at $2,714 per lot when a land-use permit is issued. Some developers, like Accent Developers in this case, have an agreement to build a portion of Washington Township Boulevard in exchange for the impact fees. Washington Township Boulevard is a $14.3 million relief route being built north of Waynesboro.
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | May 18, 2005
martinsburg@herald-mail.com RANSON, W.Va. - Ranson City Council members met with the Jefferson County Commission on Tuesday night to try to figure out how more than $500,000 the city has collected in school impact fees can be forwarded to the county. No agreement was reached after a sometimes-tense discussion that lasted around half an hour. Ranson officials want to collect the impact fees on their own and then forward them to the county, while the county wants to directly collect the fees.
NEWS
August 1, 1997
It's hard to think of a specific tax or fee that hasn't been proposed in Washington County of late, largely as a salve for the cash-hemorrhaging county sewer system. Impact fees are the latest to hit the drawing board. The theory behind impact fees sounds solid and in some areas and in some situations it is. Impact-fee designs say that if you are going to build a house, you should have to pay a tax for the services your household will require - upgraded roads, sewer and water capacity, schools, fire protection, parks and so on. As Washington County Planning Commission Chairman Bert Iseminger accurately points out, housing projects don't pay for themselves.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | July 16, 2002
charlestown@herald-mail.com CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - City officials Monday night agreed to pay a Bethesda, Md., firm $17,400 to help determine how much impact fees should be for two developments that will bring another 4,100 homes into town. Charles Town Council members also agreed to set up a mayor's capital committee to determine what type of new services needed to be added in the city because of the proposed 3,300-home Huntfield development and the 800-home Norborne Glebe development.
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