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Impact Fees

NEWS
January 23, 2001
Impact fees focus of meeting By DAVE McMILLION / Staff Writer, Charles Town CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - A cross-section of officials including school board members, county commissioners, state lawmakers and representatives from the governor's office and Congress met Tuesday night to assess the Eastern Panhandle's growth needs. Much of the discussion at the Jefferson County Board of Education office was focused on how to help counties implement impact fees, which are fees collected from developers to help pay for services like new schools, fire and police protection and other services.
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NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | March 12, 2003
Hagerstown City Council members agreed Tuesday they want a study on whether impact fees would help the city. City Finance Director Al Martin and City Engineer Rodney Tissue recommended the city hire Tischler and Associates to do the study because that firm has vast experience with impact fees. The contract would cost $6,500, according to the proposal. It could be presented to the council for approval at the March 25 meeting. The study will look at the city's needs and help city officials decide whether it makes sense to pursue impact fees.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | May 16, 2003
charlestown@herald-mail.com Charles Town, W.Va. - Two people associated with Jefferson County's home building industry appeared before the Jefferson County Commission Thursday to voice concerns about the possible implementation of impact fees. Alice Chakmakian appeared before the commission as a representative of Jefferson County Citizens for Economic Preservation, which represents people involved in the housing industry. Chakmakian said her organization does not oppose impact fees, but it is concerned about a wide range of estimations that have been presented about the average number of children generated for each house in the county.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | December 2, 2011
Mark Dyck, president of the Jefferson County Development Authority, pleaded Thursday with the Jefferson County Commission to eliminate impact fees on commercial structures, saying the fees deter new business investment. Dyck wants the fees stopped for two to four years to "give the county a competitive edge in recruiting new business. " Impact fees on nonresidential construction property have netted only about $300,000 in the last six years compared to the $16 million from fees for residential construction, Mark Schiavone, the county's impact fee coordinator, said after the meeting.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | May 9, 2003
charlestown@herald-mail.com CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Work continues on developing an impact fee system for Jefferson County, but one county official raised several questions Thursday about the county's ability to implement such fees. Impact fees are fees collected from housing developers to pay increased services needed because of population growth. Although impact fees can be used to pay for services in a number of areas, one that has been getting a lot of attention is public education.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | December 10, 2003
charlestown@herald-mail.com Saying impact fees are a "bad, bad way" to collect money for new schools in Jefferson County, a local businessman is trying to collect enough signatures to put the issue up for a county-wide vote. Under the state law that allows impact fees, 15 percent of the county's registered voters can petition the Jefferson County Commission to put the issue up for a referendum. The commissioners, who passed impact fees Nov. 24, have said 15 percent of Jefferson County's voters equals about 3,667 people.
NEWS
by RICHARD F. BELISLE | January 22, 2004
waynesboro@herald-mail.com WAYNESBORO, Pa. - The Washington Township Supervisors took the first step Monday in passing an impact fee ordinance by approving $9,600 for a feasibility study to determine if the fees would work in the township. Any money the township realizes from impact fees can only be spent on roads that the developments affect, Jerry Zeigler, code enforcement officer for the township, said Tuesday. Also, the supervisors sent out a call for volunteers to serve on a seven-member transportation advisory committee to be appointed to oversee the study and come up with what is called a land use assumption report.
NEWS
July 28, 1997
Seven years after another board of Washington County Commissioners backed away from a fight over development impact fees, the fiscal condition of the cash-poor county government is forcing another look at new revenue sources. A $100,000 study of development costs here is timely, in view of the growth likely to spill over South Mountain when those shopping for homes in Frederick County discover they can cut their costs by traveling another 15 minutes up Interstate 70. The study's timing is right for several reasons, one of them political.
NEWS
BY DAVE McMILLION | March 8, 2002
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Over strong objections by one member, the Jefferson County Commission Thursday night voted to negotiate a contract with a Bethesda, Md. firm to set up an impact fee system for the county. Impact fees are charged to developers to help pay for expanded public services needed because of growth, such as new schools, expanded water and sewer service and other needs. Commissioner James G. Knode told the commissioners he thinks it is wrong for the county to implement impact fees.
NEWS
January 24, 2001
Tabb states impact fee concerns By DAVE McMILLION / Staff Writer, Charles Town CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - A Jefferson County Commissioner said Tuesday night she is worried about the headaches that could be associated with implementing impact fees in the county. Many residents are anxious for the Jefferson County Commission to impose impact fees as a way to pay for increased services needed because of growth. The impact fees would be collected from developers and could be used to pay for new school construction, expanded fire and police service and other services.
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