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Impact Fees

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NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | April 4, 2011
The future of traffic impact fees in Washington Township, Pa., remains undecided, as the township supervisors announced Monday they will delay further discussion until April 13. The supervisors are considering lowering the existing fees or establishing new ones. Traffic impact fees are assessed on new development in a defined geographic zone to fund development of Washington Township Boulevard. That relief route, last estimated at $16.7 million, would provide an east-west alternative to Pa. 16. The first section from Pa. 16 in Rouzerville, Pa., to Old Forge Road is open, and a $3 million bridge was built near Country Club Road.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | October 15, 2002
charlestown@herald-mail.com CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Jefferson County Schools officials are close to finalizing a cost-per-student figure that will be used to help develop a school impact fee for Jefferson County. Impact fees are charged to housing developers to help pay for expanded public services needed because of growth, such as new schools, expanded water and sewer service and other needs. There has been a push among some groups and individuals in the county to start impact fees because of expected population increases in the county in coming years.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | August 5, 2013
Traffic impact fees have been lowered in Washington Township, Pa., in an effort to stimulate economic development. The Washington Township Supervisors voted Monday on a proposal to reduce the fees to $2,714 per traffic unit. Those fees were $3,147 per unit. The supervisors voted 4-0 to lower the rate. Supervisor Jeff Geesaman was absent from the meeting. There was no discussion on the issue Monday night. Impact fees are assessed on residential and commercial development in certain geographic zones.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | April 1, 2013
A committee tasked with reviewing the traffic impact fees on select new development in Washington Township, Pa., has recommended those fees be lowered. The committee, largely composed of real estate professionals, has recommended the impact fee be reduced to an amount between $2,486 and $2,714, saying the Washington Township Supervisors can use their discretion when setting the amount. The impact fees are assessed on each “traffic unit” created by new development within specific geographic zones.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | July 15, 2013
The Washington Township (Pa.) Supervisors said Monday they intend to lower the municipality's traffic impact fees. The supervisors plan to vote Aug. 5 on a proposal to reduce the fees to $2,714 per traffic unit. Currently, they are $3,147 per unit. The $2,714 fee was the original amount before it was raised several years ago. Impact fees are assessed on residential and commercial development in certain geographic zones. Revenue from the fees is designated for construction of Washington Township Boulevard, a multimillion-dollar relief route north of Waynesboro.
NEWS
February 10, 1999
Facing millions in new expenses for the school system, the Washington County Commissioners are taking another look at impact fees. Nine years after receiving the state legislature's approval to enact the fees, the county board may be ready to put them into place. Before that, we recommend they look back at a report done on the issue by a citizen study committee back in 1989. A year after that report, the Maryland General Assembly gave the commissioners the power to set fees, provided that they first create a department of public works and enact an adequate public facilities plan.
NEWS
July 27, 1997
By STEVEN T. DENNIS Staff Writer Seven years after the Washington County Commissioners last seriously considered the controversial measure of impact fees, a projected $27 million gap in capital budget funding over the next five years has rekindled the issue. A $100,000 study of the costs of development is in the works, though not yet approved by the commissioners, said County Planning Director Robert Arch. The study would include ways to pay for development costs, including impact fees or special taxing districts, Arch said.
NEWS
June 27, 1997
It's a measure of how short of cash the Washington County government is - and expects to be for a long time - that the idea of development impact fees is getting another hearing. That idea was political poison in 1990, when the Washington County Homebuilders placed ads emphasizing that they and "their 4,400 employees" didn't like the idea. That was the year young Greg Snook made his first try for commissioner and was pleasantly surprised to find himself the top vote-getter, which some regarded as a warning to the incumbents that impact fees were better forgotten.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | March 10, 2004
gregs@herald-mail.com HAGERSTOWN - The Hagerstown City Council on Tuesday took steps toward setting fees that developers would pay to offset the impact of new buildings on city services and facilities. At Tuesday's mayor and council meeting, the council gave preliminary approval for a Bethesda, Md., contractor to begin calculating the amounts at which impact fees could be set to raise money from new development to pay for such things as more police protection and road improvements.
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NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | August 5, 2013
Traffic impact fees have been lowered in Washington Township, Pa., in an effort to stimulate economic development. The Washington Township Supervisors voted Monday on a proposal to reduce the fees to $2,714 per traffic unit. Those fees were $3,147 per unit. The supervisors voted 4-0 to lower the rate. Supervisor Jeff Geesaman was absent from the meeting. There was no discussion on the issue Monday night. Impact fees are assessed on residential and commercial development in certain geographic zones.
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NEWS
July 31, 2013
9/11 memorial in Pa. to be dedicated Sept. 11 WAYNESBORO, Pa. - Developers of a Sept. 11, 2001, memorial in Washington Township, Pa., are planning to dedicate the site on the 12th anniversary of the worst terrorist attacks on U.S. soil. A schedule is still being formed for dedication of the memorial at Red Run Park on Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013, according to William Conrad, chairman of the memorial committee of volunteers. The memorial's time capsule will be sealed the following Monday evening so that news coverage of the initial ceremony can be included, Conrad said Wednesday.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | July 15, 2013
The Washington Township (Pa.) Supervisors said Monday they intend to lower the municipality's traffic impact fees. The supervisors plan to vote Aug. 5 on a proposal to reduce the fees to $2,714 per traffic unit. Currently, they are $3,147 per unit. The $2,714 fee was the original amount before it was raised several years ago. Impact fees are assessed on residential and commercial development in certain geographic zones. Revenue from the fees is designated for construction of Washington Township Boulevard, a multimillion-dollar relief route north of Waynesboro.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | April 1, 2013
A committee tasked with reviewing the traffic impact fees on select new development in Washington Township, Pa., has recommended those fees be lowered. The committee, largely composed of real estate professionals, has recommended the impact fee be reduced to an amount between $2,486 and $2,714, saying the Washington Township Supervisors can use their discretion when setting the amount. The impact fees are assessed on each “traffic unit” created by new development within specific geographic zones.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | September 10, 2012
The Washington Township (Pa.) Planning Commission on Monday recommended approval of land-development plans for a property being eyed for Auto Zone. Motorists accessing the 7,380-square-foot building would use Geiser Avenue off East Main Street. Ronnie Martin from Long-Mar LLC, the developer, said even with municipal approval of the plans, the retailer might not commit. He said the problem is the township impact fees on certain new development. “With the impact fees, this may not go,” Martin said.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | February 16, 2012
Following a recommendation from the outgoing county administrator, the Jefferson County Commission Thursday voted to eliminate the county's impact fee department and abolish the director's position. Tim Boyde, who resigned as county administrator in January, suggested in a confidential exit memorandum that since the housing downturn, impact fees are only “trickling in and the justification for a full-time impact fee coordinator does not exist.” The commissioners, on a motion by Commissioner Dale Manuel, voted 3-2 to dismantle the capital planning and impact fee department and terminate the job of F. Mark Schiavone, its longtime coordinator.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | December 2, 2011
Mark Dyck, president of the Jefferson County Development Authority, pleaded Thursday with the Jefferson County Commission to eliminate impact fees on commercial structures, saying the fees deter new business investment. Dyck wants the fees stopped for two to four years to "give the county a competitive edge in recruiting new business. " Impact fees on nonresidential construction property have netted only about $300,000 in the last six years compared to the $16 million from fees for residential construction, Mark Schiavone, the county's impact fee coordinator, said after the meeting.
NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | kate.alexander@herald-mail.com | April 5, 2011
The Hagerstown City Council Tuesday night was reluctant to waive a 2004 road impact fee without revisiting the intent of its creation. Representatives of three properties off Eastern Boulevard asked the council to waive its Eastern Boulevard road assessment fee, questioning the fee's fairness. The city adopted an ordinance in April 2004 that established the Eastern Boulevard Improvement Fee District for a section of the city just north of Dual Highway on both sides of Eastern Boulevard.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | April 4, 2011
The future of traffic impact fees in Washington Township, Pa., remains undecided, as the township supervisors announced Monday they will delay further discussion until April 13. The supervisors are considering lowering the existing fees or establishing new ones. Traffic impact fees are assessed on new development in a defined geographic zone to fund development of Washington Township Boulevard. That relief route, last estimated at $16.7 million, would provide an east-west alternative to Pa. 16. The first section from Pa. 16 in Rouzerville, Pa., to Old Forge Road is open, and a $3 million bridge was built near Country Club Road.
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